Tuesday 2 June 1668

Up, and to the office, where all the morning. At noon home to dinner, and there dined with me, besides my own people, W. Batelier and Mercer, and we very merry. After dinner, they gone, only Mercer and I to sing a while, and then parted, and I out and took a coach, and called Mercer at their back-door, and she brought with her Mrs. Knightly, a little pretty sober girl, and I carried them to Old Ford, a town by Bow, where I never was before, and there walked in the fields very pleasant, and sang: and so back again, and stopped and drank at the Gun, at Mile End, and so to the Old Exchange door, and did buy them a pound of cherries, cost me 2s., and so set them down again; and I to my little mercer’s Finch, that lives now in the Minories, where I have left my cloak, and did here baiser su moher, a belle femme, and there took my cloak which I had left there, and so by water, it being now about nine o’clock, down to Deptford, where I have not been many a day, and there it being dark I did by agreement aller a la house de Bagwell, and there after a little playing and baisando we did go up in the dark a su camera … and to my boat again, and against the tide home. Got there by twelve o’clock, taking into my boat, for company, a man that desired a passage — a certain western bargeman, with whom I had good sport, talking of the old woman of Woolwich, and telling him the whole story.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M provide what's omitted by the ellipsis above:

"I did by agreement andar a la house de Bagwell; and there, after a little playing and baisando, we did go up in the dark a su camera and there fasero la grand cosa upon the bed; and that being hecho, did go away and to my boat again, and against the tide home; got there by 12 a-clock and to bed, taking into my boat, for company, a man that desired a passage, a certain western bargeman, with whom I had good sport, talking of the old woman of Woolwich and telling him the whole story."

Paul Chapin   Link to this

fasero
My best guess is that this is Sam's pidgin version of Latin "facere" 'to do'. Anybody have a better idea?

With that, the bowdlerized passage in English would be "we did go up in the dark to her bedroom and there did the big thing upon the bed; and that being done, did go away ..."

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"I did by agreement aller a la house de Bagwell"

By agreement? Is Sam actually sending messages to Mrs B? Presumably there was a system of communicating regularly with the dockyards but surely he would have been tempting fate enclosing private notes to a married woman?

And what was the story of the Old Woman of Woolwich? We are entitled to know.

Mary   Link to this

The Old Woman of Woolwich.

L&M simply states that this story has not been traced. What a pity.

cgs   Link to this

Old woman of blah, before the days of mass communication , there were always fables about a woman that lived a life ? In the town / village beyond the standard hours hike.
Witches or madams that provided the missing modern entertainment, now we can use the ether.

FJA   Link to this

cgs: It is good to have you back on the job. I've missed your salty offerings.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Me too. Welcome back, cgs.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"There was an old woman of Woolwich......"

No, it doesn't really work.

Grahamt   Link to this

There was an old woman of Woolwich,
Ran a coven just over by Dulwich.
She had a black cat,
A toad and a bat,
That witchy old woman of Woolwich.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Ah, the tale of the Old Woman of Woolwich..." Sam, nodding at his companion. "Yes, a tale of mystery and horror...I remember it well. It all began during my first undergrad break when I took commission for my father and with three master cloth salesmen entered the town of Woolwich. We had been walking for miles...And miles...And miles..."

nix   Link to this

Add me to the cgs welcoming committee.

cgs   Link to this

Thank you all, have been peeping/lurking but not commenting due to inefficient finger poking on the ereader.

pepfie   Link to this

fasero

PC, I've got no better idea than yours regarding your translation. Obviously, he reports whatsoever he or they were doing in the immediate past, and equally obviously that "fasero" must be derived in some way from Latin facere. I do believe, however, that he knew his Latin quite well, and I know there is only one Latin verb form fēcerō (I shall have done) first-person singular future perfect active indicative of faciō which doesn't make any sense at all. The same goes for Italian fécero (they have done) third-person plural past historic of fare. Neither Spanish hacer to which the following ppl. hecho relates nor French faire have any forms ending on -ero. So I think "fasero" belongs to a separate Romance language I'd call Romantic Pepysian.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a certain western bargeman, with whom I had good sport, talking of the old woman of Woolwich"

L&M note western bargemen plied upstream from London Bridge; Woolwich lay in the territory of their rivals, plying downriver.

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