Wednesday 3 June 1668

Up, and to the office, where busy till 9 o’clock, and then to White Hall, to the Council-chamber, where I did present the Duke of York with an account of the charge of the present fleete, to his satisfaction; and this being done, did ask his leave for my going out of town five or six days, which he did give me, saying, that my diligence in the King’s business was such, that I ought not to be denied when my own business called me any whither. Thence with Sir D. Gawden to Westminster, where I did take a turn or two, and met Roger Pepys, who is mighty earnest for me to stay from going into the country till he goes, and to bring my people thither for some time: but I cannot, but will find another time this summer for it. Thence with him home, and there to the office till noon, and then with Lord Brouncker, Sir J. Minnes, and Sir G. Carteret, upon whose accounts they have been this day to the Three Tuns to dinner, and thence back again home, and after doing a little business I by coach to the King’s house, and there saw good, part of “The Scornfull Lady,” and that done, would have takn out Knepp, but she was engaged, and so to my Lord Crew’s to visit him; from whom I learn nothing but that there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich’s signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it. Thence by coach to Westminster to the Hall, and thence to the Park, where much good company, and many fine ladies; and in so handsome a hackney I was, that I believe Sir W. Coventry and others, who looked on me, did take me to be in one of my own, which I was a little troubled for. So to the lodge, and drank a cup of new milk, and so home, and there to Mrs. Turner’s, and sat and talked with her, and then home to bed, having laid my business with W. Hewer to go out of town Friday next, with hopes of a great deal of pleasure.

9 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...I ought not to be denied when my own business called me any whither."

"any whither" - haven't encoutered that nice (obsolete) phrase before.

Chris Squire   Link to this

‘anywhither, adv. Indefinite compound of whither. To or towards any place, in any direction whatever.
1611 Bible (A.V.) 1 Kings ii. 36 Goe not forth thence any whither [ Wyclif & Coverdale hidir and thider.]
1658 O. Cromwell Speech 20 Jan. in Writings & Speeches (1947) IV. 705 To fly for Holland, New-England, almost any-whither, to find Liberty for their Consciences.
1722 D. Defoe Jrnl. Plague Year 69 There was no easie passing the Roads any whither . . ’ [OED]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Jamie...Nice boss, miserably rigid autocrat. Another of those European monarchs who'd probably have done quite well as a powerless figurehead in a constitutional monarchy but was unfortunate enough to have been born in the wrong era.

cgs   Link to this

James was tarred with unpopular fluvius tiberinus

Jenny Long   Link to this

I'm very pleased to be joining my fellow "Pepysians". I've joined late and would like to annotate older entries. Is that allowed"

Mary   Link to this

Certainly. The practice is for all recently posted annotations, whether referring to the current page of the diary or to older entries, are flagged under the "Recent Activity" tag.

Jenny   Link to this

Thank you Mary.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"and in so handsome a hackney I was, that I believe Sir W. Coventry and others, who looked on me, did take me to be in one of my own, which I was a little troubled for."

First rule of embezzlement: Don't arrive at the office in an expensive sports car.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich’s signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it. "

L&M relate the Privy Council had decided in an inquiry of 29-30 May that Sandwich should not have added his signature at the bottom of the treaty, but the signatures of Charles II and Sandwich should have come first.

[ Methinks the signatures of the plenipotentiaries of the parties to the treaty should be first, as it was. ]

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