Friday 24 April 1668

Up betimes, and by water to White Hall, to the Duke of York, and there hear that this day Hollis and Temple purpose to bring in the petition against Sir W. Coventry, which I am sorry for, but hope he will get out of it. Here I presented Mrs. Pett and her condition to Mr. Wren for his favour, which he promised us. Thence to Lord Brouncker and sat and talked with him, who thinks the Parliament will, by their violence and delay in money matters, force the King to run any hazard, and dissolve them. Thence to Ducke Lane, and there did overlook a great many of Monsieur Fouquet’s library, that a bookseller hath bought, and I did buy one Spanish [work], “Los Illustres Varones.” Here did I endeavour to see my pretty woman that I did baiser in las tenebras a little while depuis. And did find her sofa in the book[shop], but had not la confidence para alter a elle. So lost my pains. But will another time, and so home and to my office, and then to dinner. After dinner down to the Old Swan, and by the way called at Michell’s, and there did see Betty, and that was all, for either she is shy or foolish, and su mardi hath no mind para laiser me see su moher. To White Hall by water, and there did our business with the Duke of York, which was very little, only here I do hear the Duke of York tell how Sir W. Pen’s impeachment was brought into the House of Lords to-day; and spoke with great kindness of him: and that the Lords would not commit him till they could find precedent for it, and did incline to favour him. Thence to the King’s playhouse, and there saw a piece of “Beggar’s Bush,” which I have not seen some years, and thence home, and there to Sir W. Pen’s and supped and sat talking there late, having no where else to go, and my eyes too bad to read right, and so home to bed.

15 Annotations

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Could someone help with translations of Sam's Spancais (or Franish), please? Thanks in advance.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

[Message of King Charles II to both Houses of Parliament, intimating the time & duration of an intended prorogation]
House of Commons Journal Volume 9 - 24 April 1668

Charles R

HIS Majesty, by His former Message, thought fit to acquaint you, that He intended the present Session of Parliament should determine on Monday the 4th of May: But, finding that the Proceedings in many important Businesses, now under Agitation, would be lost, if there should be a Cession; and that many things, not yet foreseen, may happen to induce him to call you together again before Winter; hath now thought fit to acquaint you, that He intends only an Adjournment for about Three Months; and desires you therefore to perfect the Bill for Supplies, and such others as may be made ready by the said 4th of May, so that he may then give His Royal Assent to them before the Adjournment.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Methinks both Pepys and Ormond will be glad when parliament is prorogued.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Sir W. Pen’s impeachment was brought into the House of Lords to-day"

House of Lords Journal

Sir Wm. Penn to attend at the Bar.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Terry W   Link to this

"Could someone help with translations of Sam’s Spancais (or Franish), please?"

Here did I endeavour to see my pretty woman that I did kiss in the shadows a little while since. And did find her sofa in the book[shop], but had not the confidence to do anything to her.

... for either she is shy or foolish, and her husband hath no mind to let me see his wife.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I presented Mrs. Pett and her condition to Mr. Wren for his favour, which he promised us"

"Mr. Christopher Pett’s widow and daughter come to me, to desire my help to the King and Duke of York, and I did promise, and do pity her." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/04/08/

L&M say she claimed many debts and her husband had been owed £500 at his death.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Uh-oh. I wonder if perhaps Betty Mitchell has spilled a few to su mardi.

"Gentlemen? Have we not met? Are you steady customers of Mr. Mitchell's?"

"We met last night, by the ruins, Mr. Pepys. Though you departed before we could be better acquainted. And close friends of Mr. M. is more like it."

"I see...Well, I'll be..."

"Just a mo, sir...Our friend Mitchell would like to return that gift of a box you made to his wife a while ago."

"Ah. No need, no need..."

"Indeed, our friend will brook no denials, sir. His gift be waiting in our cart. Perhaps a slightly larger box though not so well crafted as the one you bestowed."

Paul Chapin   Link to this

A couple of faults in the erotic polyglossia which are probably the result of mis-scans rather than Sam's linguistic eccentricities: "alter" should be "aller" (to go) and "mardi" should be "mari" (I'm sure Sam knew the difference between husbands and Tuesdays, even if he didn't care).

Michelle Wyllie   Link to this

I think that should translate into "her husband has no mind to let me see his wife."

Mary   Link to this

Sofa?

L&M renders this "did find her sola in the book[shop]" which makes much better sense. Sola = alone.

At this date the sofa had not yet become a normal article of domestic furniture in England, let alone in bookshops.

classicist   Link to this

Betty Mitchell: shy, perhaps, but foolish? Her behaviour seems eminently sensible to me!

martinb   Link to this

Alternatively, "mardi" could be someone's mis-scan of "marido" i.e. the Spanish, rather than the French, for husband.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The language problems may not be so much mis-scans as transcription difficulties.

L&M read "Here did I endeavour to see my pretty woman that I did besarr in las tenebras a little while despues. And did find her sola in the boutique, but had not la confidence para hablar a ella....After dinner down to the Old Swan, and by the way called at Michell’s and there did see Betty; and that was all, for either she is shy or foolish, and su mardido hath no mind para laisser me see su moher."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ooops -- should be "besar"....

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I do hear the Duke of York tell how Sir W. Pen’s impeachment was brought into the House of Lords to-day; and spoke with great kindness of him: and that the Lords would not commit him till they could find precedent for it, and did incline to favour him."

L&M note the Duke had been present at the debate, which ended with a command that Penn appear before the house at 10 AM 27 April and answer the charges.

The scans of the pertinent pages (232-234) of the House of Lords Journal can be read here:

http://india.british-history.ac.uk/image-pageSc...

http://india.british-history.ac.uk/image-pageSc...

http://india.british-history.ac.uk/image-pageSc...

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.