Saturday 4 April 1668

Up betimes, and by coach towards White Hall, and took Aldgate Street in my way, and there called upon one Hayward, that makes virginalls, and did there like of a little espinette, and will have him finish it for me; for I had a mind to a small harpsichon, but this takes up less room, and will do my business as to finding out of chords, and I am very well pleased that I have found it. Thence to White Hall, and after long waiting did get a small running Committee of Tangier, where I staid but little, and little done but the correcting two or three egregious faults in the Charter for Tangier after it had so long lain before the Council and been passed there and drawn up by the Atturney Generall, so slightly are all things in this age done. Thence home to the office by water, where we sat till noon, and then I moved we might go to the Duke of York and the King presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks by name) have told me this day that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them right. So we rose of a sudden, being mighty sensible of this inconvenience we are liable to should we delay to give them longer, and yet have no order for our indemnity. I did dine with Sir W. Pen, where my Lady Batten did come with desire of meeting me there, and speaking with me about the business of the 500l. we demand of her for the Chest. She do protest, before God, she never did see the account, but that it was as her husband in his life-time made it, and he did often declare to her his expecting 500l., and that we could not deny it him for his pains in that business, and that he hath left her worth nothing of his own in the world, and that therefore she could pay nothing of it, come what will come, but that he hath left her a beggar, which I am sorry truly for, though it is a just judgment upon people that do live so much beyond themselves in housekeeping and vanity, as they did. I did give her little answer, but generally words that might not trouble her, and so to dinner, and after dinner Sir W. Pen and I away by water to White Hall, and there did attend the Duke of York, and he did carry us to the King’s lodgings: but he was asleep in his closet; so we stayed in the Green-Roome, where the Duke of York did tell us what rules he had, of knowing the weather, and did now tell us we should have rain before to- morrow, it having been a dry season for some time, and so it did rain all night almost; and pretty rules he hath, and told Brouncker and me some of them, which were such as no reason seems ready to be given. By and by the King comes out, and he did easily agree to what we moved, and would have the Commissioners of the Navy to meet us with him to-morrow morning: and then to talk of other things; about the Quakers not swearing, and how they do swear in the business of a late election of a Knight of the Shire of Hartfordshire in behalf of one they have a mind to have; and how my Lord of Pembroke says he hath heard him (the Quaker) at the tennis-court swear to himself when he loses: and told us what pretty notions my Lord Pembroke hath of the first chapter of Genesis, how Adam’s sin was not the sucking (which he did before) but the swallowing of the apple, by which the contrary elements begun to work in him, and to stir up these passions, and a great deal of such fooleries, which the King made mighty mockery at. Thence my Lord Brouncker and I into the Park in his coach, and there took a great deal of ayre, saving that it was mighty dusty, and so a little unpleasant. Thence to Common Garden with my Lord, and there I took a hackney and home, and after having done a few letters at the office, I home to a little supper and so to bed, my eyes being every day more and more weak and apt to be tired.

15 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Carteret to Ormond
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 4 April 1668

Communicates proceedings of the House of Commons of England upon matters of Trade.

Repeats the expressions as in former letters, of the writer's anxiety to wait upon the Lord Lieutenant in Ireland.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Christopher Squire   Link to this

‘espiˈnette, n. Etymology:  < Old French espinete (modern French épinette).
  = spinet n.1
1668    S. Pepys Diary 15 July (1976) IX. 262   At noon‥is brought home the Espinette I bought the other day of Haward.’

‘spinet, n.1. A keyed musical instrument, common in England in the 18th century, closely resembling the harpsichord, but smaller and having only one string to each note. A full description of the various kinds of spinet is given in Grove's Dict. Music s.v.
1664    S. Pepys Diary 1 July (1971) V. 194   One Cheswicke, a maister who plays very well upon the Spinette.’ [OED]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

One is forced to wonder as to Lady Batten's beauty that Sam fails to show any interest in taking advantage of her situation. The widow condition has certainly never stoppped him before. Though perhaps here again is Sam's involuntary social instinct kicking in...Lady Batten is off-limits in a way Mrs. Burroughs could never be.

Jesse   Link to this

[The] sin was not the smoking (which he did before) but the inhaling ..., by which the contrary elements begun to work in him, and to stir up these passions.

Oh wait, that argument comes over three hundred years later - and there was no inhaling. The "mighty mockery" bit still goes.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

then I moved we might go to the Duke of York and the King presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks by name) have told me this day that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them right.

Can someone clarify this? I had assumed that Sam and his colleagues had agreed not to accept bribes from their suppliers but, if so, why would the tradesmen complain?

Don McCahill   Link to this

> One is forced to wonder as to Lady Batten’s beauty that Sam fails to show any interest in taking advantage of her situation.

Sam has a very small circle of "acquaintances of affair." As well as not chasing those higher than his circle, he does not seem interested in the common prostitutes, which I assume abounded at the time. He only wants the women from the social class he has risen out of.

djc   Link to this

"then I moved we might go to the Duke of York and the King presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks by name) have told me this day that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them right. "

The tradesmen are complaining about not being paid, but the Commissioners of the Treasury have refused to back the paper (certificates) issued by the Navy board. Yesterday:

"I was unwilling to enter into a contest with them; but took advantage of two or three words last spoke, and brought it to a short issue in good words, that if we had the King’s order to hold our hands, we would, which did end the matter: and they all resolved we should have it, and so it ended:"

So now they are going to get the King's order in writing(to not pay the tradesmen) so as to cover themselves against future complaints.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I moved we might go to the Duke of York and the King presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks by name) have told me this day that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them right"

L&M note Banks had written on behalf of two neighbors who were creditors of the navy [presumably had certificates = bonds]. On 3 April the Council had ordered the Navy Board to issue no more certificates on the Eleven Months Tax, a matter that had been under consideration in the Council since at least 18 March when Pepys "did set the Office and [himself] right, and went away with the victory, my Lord Keeper saying that he would not advise the Council to order us to sign no more certificates." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/18/ There L&M note Pepys seemed to defend the practice of the Navy Board insofar as it concerned payment of interest to creditors rather than payment for goods; however the Exchequer had failed io budget any interest payments, so the matter was referred to the local collection agency -- the law [presumably sherifs].

Robert Gertz   Link to this

As I said, that involuntary social instinct may be the barrier blocking Sam from an approach on Lady B...Yet something's lacking...He usually at least comments on the beauty even if it's unattainable or somehow (Betty Pierce) off-limits. Of course Lady B may simply not appeal to him and still be a very beautiful woman.

As for prostitutes, Tomalin seems convinced thought tempted on one or two occasions, Sam feared their vd...And quite right would he have been to do so.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"my Lady Batten did come with desire of meeting me there, and speaking with me about the business of the 500l. we demand of her for the Chest. "

The Chatham Chest was a fund to pay pensions for disabled seamen. L&M note Batten had claimed the sum (and apparently had been paid it) for having managed a certain sub-fund of the Chest in 1660-3.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

Thanks, djc and Terry. That makes much more sense.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"and that he hath left her worth nothing of his own in the world"
How about "Mingo"?he was supposed to have had left some kind of pension?!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"it having been a dry season for some time"

L&M note January-February 1668 had been unusually warm and March unusually dry. The summer will be a long warm one.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the Quakers not swearing, and how they do swear in the business of a late election of a Knight of the Shire of Hartfordshire in behalf of one they have a mind to have;"

L&M note that if this bye-election were close, challenged voters would have had to swear "they were properly qualified as forty-shilling freeholders" -- something that in 1690, for conscience' sake, the Hertfordshire majority of the Quaker voters refused to do, and their candidate was disqualified by the Commons.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Common Garden "

Interesting that Pepys apparently sometimes writes this (L&M transcribe it here also).

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