Friday 27 March 1668

Up, and walked to the waterside, and thence to White Hall to the Duke of York’s chamber, where he being ready he went to a Committee of Tangier, where I first understand that my Lord Sandwich is, in his coming back from Spayne, to step over thither, to see in what condition the place is, which I am glad of, hoping that he will be able to do some good there, for the good of the place, which is so much out of order. Thence to walk a little in Westminster Hall, where the Parliament I find sitting, but spoke with nobody to let me know what they are doing, nor did I enquire. Thence to the Swan and drank, and did baiser Frank, and so down by water back again, and to the Exchange a turn or two, only to show myself, and then home to dinner, where my wife and I had a small squabble, but I first this day tried the effect of my silence and not provoking her when she is in an ill humour, and do find it very good, for it prevents its coming to that height on both sides which used to exceed what was fit between us. So she become calm by and by and fond, and so took coach, and she to the mercer’s to buy some lace, while I to White Hall, but did nothing, but then to Westminster Hall and took a turn, and so to Mrs. Martin’s, and there did sit a little and talk and drink, and did hazer con her, and so took coach and called my wife at Unthanke’s, and so up and down to the Nursery, where they did not act, then to the New Cockpit, and there missed, and then to Hide Parke, where many coaches, but the dust so great, that it was troublesome, and so by night home, where to my chamber and finished my pricking out of my song for Mr. Harris (“It is decreed”), and so a little supper, being very sleepy and weary since last night, and so by to o’clock to bed and slept well all night. This day, at noon, comes Mr. Pelling to me, and shews me the stone cut lately out of Sir Thomas Adams’ (the old comely Alderman’s) body, which is very large indeed, bigger I think than my fist, and weighs above twenty-five ounces and, which is very miraculous, he never in all his life had any fit of it, but lived to a great age without pain, and died at last of something else, without any sense of this in all his life. This day Creed at White Hall in discourse told me what information he hath had, from very good hands, of the cowardice and ill-government of Sir Jer. Smith and Sir Thomas Allen, and the repute they have both of them abroad in the Streights, from their deportment when they did at several times command there; and that, above all Englishmen that ever were there, there never was any man that behaved himself like poor Charles Wager, whom the very Moores do mention, with teares sometimes.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"This day...Mr. Pelling...shews me the stone cut lately out of Sir Thomas Adams' (the old comely Alderman's) body, which is very large indeed, bigger I think than my fist, and weighs above twenty-five ounces and, which is very miraculous, he never in all his life had any fit of it, but lived to a great age without pain, and died at last of something else, without any sense of this in all his life."

Yesterday (26 March) at the Royal Society (not in the Hooke Folio online, but in the official minutes) "Dr. Allen produced the stone lately taken out of the bladder of Sir Thomas Adams, which being weighed before the society, was found to weigh twenty-two ounces and three eighths Troy weight. Mr. Hooke was ordered to take the dimensions and draw the figure of it; and Dr. Allen was desired to procure an account in writing of all the observables, that occurred about this stone, when it lay yet in the bladder, and was taken out; as also of the accidents observed in the patient during his life-time, and particularly, whether it were true, that he did not complain of any great inconvenience from the stone till a sew days before his death." http://is.gd/QrNjzv

L&M note Adams died on the 24th February after a fall from his coach.

In a report to the Royal Society on the 27th February "Dr. Allen related, that there was taken out of the bladder of Sir Thomas Adams lately deceased a stone said to weigh twenty five ounces and three quarters, having in the midst a gutter, through which the urine had probably passed. He added, that the patient had not been heard to make any great complaint of inconvenience till his last distemper, of which he died. He promised to endeavour to procure a sight of the stone tor the society." http://is.gd/qzmoZ1

L&M note suffering from stone is caused by the small stones traveling from the kidneys to the bladder, not by those too large to move.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Orrery to Boyle
Written from: Charleville
Date: 27 March 1668

Renews his protestations of attachment to the Duke of Ormond.

The writer always "believed" that his father got a great estate, very well; but he was certain of it, after the matter had passed Lord Strafford's inquiry. The Duke would obtain a like "certainty" of the falsity of the suggestions made by the writer's enemies, could Lord Orrery pass the trial he "so passionately desires to undergo".

Notices a marriage-treaty for Lord Shannon's son. Says, of a recent petition by Adventurers, that its gist may be expressed in a line - "We are deficient. There are lands to reprise with. Let us have all of those."

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Stan   Link to this

So Sam did baiser with Frank and hazer con Mrs Martin.

Can someone explain exactly what he did with them?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hmmn...The silent treatment. Not entirely without merit if your standard approach to ill-humor in the spouse is to demand angrily why they're out of sorts...On the other hand...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Keepin' up with the Adams'

Well, when you die Sam we'll bet yours will be bigger.

Heaven...

"And lets not forget the man was dead and it was cut out afterwards. Not to mention..."

Bess: "This would be one of those 'spoilers', Sam'l."

"Right. In any case...When I die, there'll be a surprise inside."

"I'm sure they're all waiting breathlessly..." Bess, archly. "And knock off that silent pouting..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"So Sam did baiser with Frank and hazer con Mrs Martin.

Can someone explain exactly what he did with them?"

This is Renaissance Spanish. Apparently "baiser" > besar = 'kiss'; "hazer" > hacer = 'make', 'do' (which Pepys usually associates with his orgasm).

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Translating the "dirty bits"

Duncan Grey's take on the "Coded Passages" of the early years of the Diary helps a lot. http://www.pepys.info/bits.html

Mary   Link to this

To answer Stan:

We don't know *exactly* what Sam did but, roughly speaking, he kissed young Frank (from French baiser= to kiss) and "did it with" Mrs. Martin (Spanish hazer/hacer) his long-term little bit on the side.

The brevity of the account of his bout with Mrs. Martin would seem to indicate that this was not one of his more memorable interludes.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Mary is right, of course, about baiser.

language hat   Link to this

(The verb "baiser" has acquired a much more sexual sense in modern French, but that change occurred long after Pepys' day.)

Dawn   Link to this

"being very sleepy and weary since last night, and so by to o’clock to bed and slept well all night."
Should this be TWO o'clock?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

“being very sleepy and weary since last night, and so by to o’clock to bed and slept well all night.”

Must be a scanning error, L&M read "... and so by 10 a-clock to bed - and slept well ..."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Since Pelling came at noon, I wonder if the "squabble" was stone-related.

"My, that's a ponderous stone, Pelling." Sam eyes large stone.

"What's that on my dining table?"

"Tis' the stone cut from the dead Sir Tom Adams, ma'am." Pelling explains.

"You've seen my stone before, Bess."

"Not right on my table...And not when we're about to eat...Particularly from a dead man..."

"Fetch my stone, Jane! We'll compare them, Pelling."

"Sam'l, for God's sake! Not while we're eating..."

John Lightbody   Link to this

'there never was any man that behaved himself like poor Charles Wager, whom the very Moores do mention, with teares sometimes'.

Sam showing his humanity. In mentioning the tears of the Moors, at that time a potent force in the Mediterranean, he reveals his own empathy.

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