Friday 1 February 1666/67

Up, and to the office, where I was all the morning doing business, at noon home to dinner, and after dinner down by water, though it was a thick misty and rainy day, and walked to Deptford from Redriffe, and there to Bagwell’s by appointment, where the ‘mulier etoit within expecting me venir … By and by ‘su marido’ come in, and there without any notice taken by him we discoursed of our business of getting him the new ship building by Mr. Deane, which I shall do for him. Thence by and by after a little talk I to the yard, and spoke with some of the officers, but staid but little, and the new clerk of the ‘Chequer, Fownes, did walk to Redriffe back with me. I perceive he is a very child, and is led by the nose by Cowly and his kinsman that was his clerk, but I did make him understand his duty, and put both understanding and spirit into him, so that I hope he will do well. [Much surprised to hear this day at Deptford that Mrs. Batters is going already to be married to him, that is now the Captain of her husband’s ship. She seemed the most passionate mourner in the world. But I believe it cannot be true.] — (The passage between brackets is written in the margin of the MS.) — Thence by water to Billingsgate; thence to the Old Swan, and there took boat, it being now night, to Westminster Hall, there to the Hall, and find Doll Lane, and ‘con elle’ I went to the Bell Taverne, and ‘ibi je’ did do what I would ‘con elle’ as well as I could, she ‘sedendo sobre’ thus far and making some little resistance. But all with much content, and ‘je tenai’ much pleasure ‘cum ista’. There parted, and I by coach home, and to the office, where pretty late doing business, and then home, and merry with my wife, and to supper. My brother and I did play with the base, and I upon my viallin, which I have not seen out of the case now I think these three years, or more, having lost the key, and now forced to find an expedient to open it. Then to bed.

23 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“At noon home to dinner; and after dinner down by water, though it was a thick misty and raining day, and walked to Deptford from Redriffe and there to Bagwells by appointment ­- where the moher erat within expecting mi venida. And did sensa alguna difficulty monter los degres and lie, comme jo desired it, upon lo lectum; and there I did la cosa con much voluptas. Je besa also her venter and cons and saw the poyle thereof. She would seem alguns veces very religious, but yet did permit me to hazer todo esto et quicquid amplius volebam. By and by su marido came in, and there, without any notice taken by him, we discoursed of our business of getting him the new ship building by Mr. Deane, which I shall do for him.” http://www.pepys.info/bits5.html

Michael L   Link to this

This must be what they mean by the "Swinging Sixties" in London.

cape henry   Link to this

"...which I have not seen out of the case now I think these three years..." Good grief. Has it been that long?

cape henry   Link to this

"She seemed the most passionate mourner in the world. But I believe it cannot be true." Well, Mr. Pepys, she does have to eat after all, doesn't she?

Australian Susan   Link to this

Capt B drowned on December 17th, so not really very long at all.

"....very child..." Hmmm. Wonder if others thought the same of our Sam in the late 1650s? Very here means true.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"There's no faith in you women, Bess. I tell you Mrs. Batters seemed the most passionate mourner in the world."

"I'll out do her, I promise."

***

Poor ole Batters...Well, he's remembered with friendly affection and respect in the 21st century. Which is doing better than say several insane maniac rulers of the 20th.

***
Nice to know Will Bagwell knows which side his bread is buttered on...

Still...Even knowing it was tough to get on then, a cynical young fellow indeed. I wonder that Sam puts any faith in him, regardless of services rendered.

Sam   Link to this

Can we have a translation please

Ruben   Link to this

"Mrs. Batters is going already to be married to him, that is now the Captain of her husband’s ship"

Love comes after marriage, said Grandmother.

Ruben   Link to this

I will try a translation but I am not sure it is the correct one.

"where the ‘mulier etoit within expecting me venir … By and by ‘su marido’ come in,
"where the woman was within expecting me come... by and by her husband come in,"

"find Doll Lane, and ‘con elle’ I went to the Bell Taverne, and ‘ibi je’ did do what I would ‘con elle’ as well as I could, she ‘sedendo sobre’ thus far and making some little resistance. But all with much content, and ‘je tenai’ much pleasure ‘cum ista’.

"find Doll Lane, and with her I went to the Bell Taverne, and there I did do what I would with her as well as I could, she giving way thus far and making some little resistance. But all with much content, and I had much pleasure with her."

martinb   Link to this

Very elegant sidestepping, Ruben!

language hat   Link to this

I don't think "sedendo sobre" means "giving way thus far." Sedere is 'to sit.'

jeannine   Link to this

"and the new clerk of the ‘Chequer".

I must have been reading Sam for too long. As I read through the Diary each day, I automatically think that anything written with any type of "foreign flair", accent mark, etc. immediately means that Sam is fooling around with someone and jumping into his 'code'. When I came to this sentence it actually took me a second or two to realize that 'Chequer was actually Exchequer and that he wasn't about to go grabbing after the clerk!

I also agree with martinb -Ruben does a wonderfully elegant dance describing some not so elegant actics of our hero.

Sam   Link to this

Thanks Ruben
But thats only half of what he records, can we have the rest. I take it we are not coy about his antics!!

martinb   Link to this

The key words: "venter" has to be French "ventre" or Spanish "vientre" i.e. belly. This is what he kisses first. "Cons" is obvious, and "poyle" must be French "poil" i.e. hair.

As for "sedendo sobre", if the second word is a Spanish preposition, Doll is literally "sitting on" -- sitting tight/holding firm?

A. De Araujo   Link to this

methinks Sam meant "cedendo sobre" instead of "sedendo sobre" in which case Ruben's translation is right.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

Tentativelly:climb the steps and lie like I desired it
upon the bed and did the thing with much sexual pleasure,I kiss also her belly and cunt and saw the hair thereof;she would seem sometimes very religious but yet did permit me to do all this and whatever else I wanted.

Mary   Link to this

let us be a little thankful that Sam does not enlarge further on the "whatever else I wanted."

Ruben   Link to this

1. In our time, someone like Sam would have taken a video of himself copulating with the girls, or at least a pix with his cell phone.
2. In all this years of diary we had not a word about his marital sex life, probably because it was rutine and not an adventure to treasure.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I suspect Bess has become "the wife" not to be mentioned in association with such sordid details as sexual pleasure...Unless something extraordinary occurs.

Spoiler...

As it will...

language hat   Link to this

"methinks Sam meant 'cedendo sobre' instead of 'sedendo sobre' in which case Ruben’s translation is right."

No, I think Ruben misread it. Sam knew Latin very well and would never have written ced- for sed-. Besides, "sedendo sobre" makes no sense.

language hat   Link to this

Sorry, I meant "cedendo sobre" makes no sense.

Ruben   Link to this

Dear language hat:
Your lapsus makes my point clear.

pepf   Link to this

"she ‘sedendo sobre’ thus far" seems to be a text corruption.

Look up TF's link above for L&M's more plausible transcription: "she sedento sobra una chair".

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