Thursday 31 January 1666/67

Up, and to the office, where we met and sat all the morning. At noon home to dinner, and by and by Mr. Osborne comes from Mr. Gawden, and takes money and notes for 4000l., and leaves me acknowledgment for 4000l. and odd; implying as if D. Gawden would give the 800l. between Povy and myself, but how he will divide it I know-not, till I speak with him, so that my content is not yet full in the business. In the evening stept out to Sir Robert Viner’s to get the money ready upon my notes to D. Gawden, and there hear that Mr. Temple is very ill. I met on the ‘Change with Captain Cocke, who tells me that he hears new certainty of the business of Madrid, how our Embassador and the French met, and says that two or three of my Lord’s men, and twenty one of the French men are killed, but nothing at Court of it. He fears the next year’s service through the badness of our counsels at White Hall, but that if they were wise, and the King would mind his business, he might do what he would yet. The Parliament is not yet up, being finishing some bills. So home and to the office, and late home to supper, and to talk with my wife, with pleasure, and to bed. I met this evening at Sir R. Viner’s our Mr. Turner, who I find in a melancholy condition about his being removed out of his house, but I find him so silly and so false that I dare not tell how to trust any advice to him, and therefore did speak only generally to him, but I doubt his condition is very miserable, and do pity his family. Thus the month ends: myself in very good health and content of mind in my family. All our heads full in the office at this dividing of the Comptroller’s duty, so that I am in some doubt how it may prove to intrench upon my benefits, but it cannot be much. The Parliament, upon breaking up, having given the King money with much ado, and great heats, and neither side pleased, neither King nor them. The imperfection of the Poll Bill, which must be mended before they rise, there being several horrible oversights to the prejudice of the King, is a certain sign of the care anybody hath of the King’s business. Prince Rupert very ill, and to be trepanned on Saturday next. Nobody knows who commands the fleete next year, or, indeed, whether we shall have a fleete or no. Great preparations in Holland and France, and the French have lately taken Antego from us, which vexes us. I am in a little care through my at last putting a great deal of money out of my hands again into the King’s upon tallies for Tangier, but the interest which I wholly lost while in my trunk is a temptation while things look safe, as they do in some measure for six months, I think, and I would venture but little longer.

9 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The King to the States-General of the United Provinces
Written from: [Whitehall]
Date: 31 January 1667

Having received assurances that only the wish the States have to gratify the desire of their Allies has precluded them from sending to London the Envoys who are to treat for Peace, and being most earnestly desirous to secure, speedily, the repose of Christendom, the King is willing to send his own Envoys to the Hague, where the representatives of those Allies are already present. This course, the King trusts, will obviate all possible obstruction or delay.

French.

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The London Gazette, Numb. 231

Paris, Feb 4 [N.S.]....His Majesty having been informed of the late League made between His Majesty of Great Britain *• and the States General of the United Provinces , into which they are informed that the Swedes are likewise entered, for Offering Conditions of Peace to the Two Crowns» for the Determination of the Difference between them, was pleased,-at testimony of his readiness to- an Accommodation , to give Order to the Sieur Colbert, his Master of Requests , to set forwards the 15th instant for Aix La Chappelle, there to attend the arrival of the rest of the Plenipotentiaries concerned in the future Treaty.

Whitehal, Jan. 31. This day His Majesty was pleased in Council to order His Proclamation to be issued out for the setting the Prizes of all kinds of wines for the year ensueing. publishing and declaring, that for one year next following to be accounted from the First of February, Canary Wines, Alecant, and Mufcadel be not fold in Gross, at above Twenty four pounds the Butt or Pipe, and at Nine pence the Pint by Retail; and that Sack and Malaga be not sold in Gross at above Twenty two pounds the Butt, and Eight pence the Pint by Retail « and that French Wines be not sold in Grofs at above Twenty three pounds the Tun, and Eight pence the Quart by Retail; and that Rbenisb Wines be not fold in Gross at above Six pounds the Ame, and Twelve pence the Quart by Retail j and according to these proportions,for greater or lefer quantities, eitl.er in Gioss or by Retail; these Rates and Priccs to be ouly observed in all His Majesties Ports and other places within this Realm where Wines are landed, and within ten miles of those ports and places; and in those places where Wines by Land-carriage shall be conveyed more then 10 miles from the next Port, the several forts of Wines aforefaid, shall and may be fold according to the Rates aforesaid, with an allowance not exceeding Four pounds the Tunn, and One penny the Quart for the Carriage thereof upon Land every 30.miles, and according to that proportion, and not at greater Rates, under such pains and penalties, as by the Proclamation it self will more fully appear..

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/231/pages/2

Australian Susan   Link to this

Tallies

I am reading a book about early 15th century London at the moment. It is mentioned that tallies were in use then to serve as accounts for those in the province who were illiterate and that this practice was regarded then as old-fashioned. The 15th century London merchants would probably have been surprised to see the practice still in use in a much more literate society in late 17th century London and that it continued (see PG's notes) up until 1828. It shows the innate conservatism of government accounting.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Peace process???!

Whitehall, Jan. 31....the King [of England] is willing to send his own Envoys to the Hague, where the representatives of those Allies are already present....

Paris, Feb 4 [N.S.]….His Majesty [Louis XIV] was pleased...to give Order to the Sieur Colbert, his Master of Requests , to set forwards the 15th instant for Aix La Chappelle, there to attend the arrival of the rest of the Plenipotentiaries concerned in the future Treaty.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"the interest which I wholly lost while in my trunk is a temptation while things look safe"

The eternal tradeoff between security and profit.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

the interest which I wholly lost while in my trunk is a temptation while things look safe, as they do in some measure for six months
To lend or not to lend. Whether to put the money under the mattress or lend it out at interest, that is the question. I marvel that Sam thinks he can get his money back from the king with interest, but that's how he came down on the question.

Mary   Link to this

Yes, and people continue to place their money in government bonds, trusting to the statement that "the government is unlikely to go bust or to default on interest payments" but "the return of capital cannot be guaranteed in all circumstances."

I quote from a UK government information site. When "king" equalled "government" the position was doubtless much more shaky, but there ain't no absolute guarantees even now. In the end one relies on a certain amount of robbing Peter to pay Paul.

It would be good to know what the interest-rate was that tempted Sam to speculate on the redemption of the Tangier tallies.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I am in a little care through my at last putting a great deal of money out of my hands again into the King’s upon tallies for Tangier, but the interest which I wholly lost while in my trunk is a temptation while things look safe, as they do in some measure for six months, I think, and I would venture but little longer."

Mattress...Bank...Mattress...Bank...

Six months from now...

"My Lord? What did you mean when you laughed and said the King is running a confidence scheme with those tallies? And thank God none of us were such fools as to risk our own money with them?"

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"It would be good to know what the interest-rate was that tempted Sam to speculate on the redemption of the Tangier tallies."

Mary, others may also enjoy the article "FINANCES" by Henry Roseveare in the L&M Companion Vol. X, pp. 130-7.

http://short.to/15eqh

It doesn't address your question directly, but gives some idea of the potential gains and losses the were huge by our standards.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.