Sunday 22 April 1666

(Lord’s day). Up, and put on my new black coate, long down to my knees, and with Sir W. Batten to White Hall, where all in deep mourning for the Queene’s mother. There had great discourse, before the Duke and Sir W. Coventry begun the discourse of the day about the purser’s business, which I seconded, and with great liking to the Duke, whom however afterward my Lord Bruncker and Sir W. Pen did stop by some thing they said, though not much to the purpose, yet because our proposition had some appearance of certain charge to the King it was ruled that for this year we should try another the same in every respect with ours, leaving out one circumstance of allowing the pursers the victuals of all men short of the complement. I was very well satisfied with it and am contented to try it, wishing it may prove effectual. Thence away with Sir W. Batten in his coach home, in our way he telling me the certaine newes, which was afterward confirmed to me this day by several, that the Bishopp of Munster has made a league [with] the Hollanders, and that our King and Court are displeased much at it: moreover we are not sure of Sweden. I home to my house, and there dined mighty well, my poor wife and Mercer and I. So back again walked to White Hall, and there to and again in the Parke, till being in the shoemaker’s stockes. —[A cant expression for tight shoes.]— I was heartily weary, yet walked however to the Queene’s Chappell at St. James’s, and there saw a little mayde baptized; many parts and words whereof are the same with that of our Liturgy, and little that is more ceremonious than ours. Thence walked to Westminster and eat a bit of bread and drank, and so to Worster House, and there staid, and saw the Council up, and then back, walked to the Cockepitt, and there took my leave of the Duke of Albemarle, who is going to-morrow to sea. He seems mightily pleased with me, which I am glad of; but I do find infinitely my concernment in being careful to appear to the King and Duke to continue my care of his business, and to be found diligent as I used to be. Thence walked wearily as far as Fleet Streete and so there met a coach and home to supper and to bed, having sat a great while with Will Joyce, who come to see me, and it is the first time I have seen him at my house since the plague, and find him the same impertinent, prating coxcombe that ever he was.

18 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I wonder if all the afternoon's to and froing was simply to stay near the Cockpit to see off Albemarle when he showed...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... that the Bishopp of Munster has made a league [with] the Hollanders, and that our King and Court are displeased much at it: ..."

For some months in 1665 English diplomatic efforts had centered on pressuring the Dutch by organizing a land invasion from the west. Pepys had noted Blackwell going abroad, in July, in fact to make payment to Bernard von Galen to secure his invasion of the Netherlands by land:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/06/
and inaccurate rumors of Blackwell’s location:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/22/#c22...
News reports of Dutch fears of Bernard’s invasion and intervention:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/07/27/#c22...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

Apologies: above "invasion from the west..." -- should read "east"

jeannine   Link to this

From Lady Castlemaine’s Diary today…..

"While passing through White Hall I was sorry to see my little Samuel Pepys, for the mourning forceing all the men to go in black, with their hair plain and without any finery, I find him to be a much more ordinary man than ever I durst have thought he was; and, indeed, is not so handsome as Mr. Batten, whom I saw there also..."

David   Link to this

"moreover we are not sure of Sweden."

You never can be sure about Sweden . . . . .

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the discourse of the day about the purser’s business"

Wherein "it was ruled that for this year we should try another the same in every respect with ours, leaving out one circumstance of allowing the pursers the victuals of all men short of the complement" -- with Pepys's assent.

Can someone clarify? How does this differ from Pepys's proposition? http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/01/01/#c27... And why does Pepys find the modification inconsequential?

Mary   Link to this

"the shoemaker's stocks"

A lively expression for what must have been a painful and all-too-common situation, shoes not being made specifically for left or right feet at this date, but requiring use by the wearer to shape shoes to either foot.
Think of the corns and blisters!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

How does this differ from Pepys’s proposition?

SP's original proposal gave the pursers any difference between the victualing allowance for the nominal and actual ship's crew, if that lesser than the nominal: the proposal as passed limits the pursers allowance to the actual crew number if that less than the nominal number.

The old system had been for the pursers to be paid for the number of men listed on the ships books, leading to inflation in crew numbers, but actual under-manning, with the purser pocketing the extra victualing allowance and the ship's captain the wages. For a full discussion of the old systems and the effect of SP's reform see N.A.M. Rodger 'Command of the Ocean' 2004, pp. 105-6

David Vaeth   Link to this

always good to start the day with a laugh and today, Jeannine, thanks for providing it!

Ant   Link to this

Sunday - Lord's Day - and yet so much day-to-day business is transacted. Compare to the boredom of 1960's England Sundays (didn't Tony Hancock do a routine on that ?)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Povy..." nod as group united in mourning black proceeds.

"Pepys? What's with the hobbling gait?"

"Shoes. That dratted Hobson..."

"But I told you...Forget Hobson's. Will Mossip, his star bootmaker's gone into business on his own."

"Yes...I know but..."

"No pretty young daughters..." Povy nods.

"Some things are worth suffering for, Povy."

Phoenix   Link to this

This may have been discussed previously and I missed it but what does Sam mean by 'poor wife'? Is he expressing sympathy, pity or condescension? Is she somehow impoverished - social graces, learning? What does this tell us about him?

JKM   Link to this

Phoenix, Sam's been calling her his "poor wife" since she returned from visitng his parents in the country. Perhaps he's been getting an earful ever since about how awful it was!

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"my poor wife"
She has been abused in the past,and the cheating is still going on.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Poor wretch" is another way he describes her. I don't think he does it with (conscious)guilt but as more of a pet name. "Poor wife" seems to come up when he wants to take special notice of her labors. She seems very willing to take on any task he gives her or their life together requires (wash day, chamber pot clean-up, nightmare trips to the parents in the sticks)and I actually believe he respects that quality in her.

And of course there's got to be a little guilt...

Ruben   Link to this

"shoes not being made specifically for left or right feet at this date, but requiring use by the wearer to shape shoes to either foot.
Think of the corns and blisters!"

This shoes were Straigth Ray. The toe cap was made bigger than it is made today,so the shoes looked like Mickey Mouse's shoes, (or old Treasure Island ilustrations) so no corns or blisters. And no Hallux Valgus!
When high heels developed this bigger toe cap became a problem because the foot would slip forward and the toes bended painfully, etc.
To counter this the waist of the shoe had to be made tighter and the lacing longer.
Then someone made the final jump: a left and a rigth shoe! This was very expensive because the shoemaker had to make 2 lasts instead of one.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Good points, Ruben.

Q: When did 'Left' and 'Right' foot shoes come into existence?

A: Seperate 'lasts' (a last is a model of the foot used to make a shoe around) for left and right feet were first introduced in 1818 but their use didn't become widespread until the 1850's; most boots worn by soldiers inthe American Civil War were still identical left and right. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/When_did_%27Left%27_a...

Australian Susan   Link to this

Here is an example of Charles in a state of shoemaker's stocks (marvellous expression) one would think. Good website!
http://www.shoeblog.com/blog/friday-shoe-histor...

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.