Friday 9 March 1665/66

Up, and being ready, to the Cockpitt to make a visit to the Duke of Albemarle, and to my great joy find him the same man to me that [he has been] heretofore, which I was in great doubt of, through my negligence in not visiting of him a great while; and having now set all to rights there, I am in mighty ease in my mind and I think shall never suffer matters to run so far backward again as I have done of late, with reference to my neglecting him and Sir W. Coventry. Thence by water down to Deptford, where I met my Lord Bruncker and Sir W. Batten by agreement, and to measuring Mr. Castle’s new third-rate ship, which is to be called the Defyance.1 And here I had my end in saving the King some money and getting myself some experience in knowing how they do measure ships. Thence I left them and walked to Redriffe, and there taking water was overtaken by them in their boat, and so they would have me in with them to Castle’s house, where my Lady Batten and Madam Williams were, and there dined and a deale of doings. I had a good dinner and counterfeit mirthe and pleasure with them, but had but little, thinking how I neglected my business. Anon, all home to Sir W. Batten’s and there Mrs. Knipp coming we did spend the evening together very merry. She and I singing, and, God forgive me! I do still see that my nature is not to be quite conquered, but will esteem pleasure above all things, though yet in the middle of it, it has reluctances after my business, which is neglected by my following my pleasure. However musique and women I cannot but give way to, whatever my business is. They being gone I to the office a while and so home to supper and to bed.

  1. William Castell wrote to the Navy Commissioners on February 17th, 1665-66, to inform them that the “Defiance” had gone to Longreach, and again, on February 22nd, to say that Mr. Grey had no masts large enough for the new ship. Sir William Batten on March 29th asked for the consent of the Board to bring the “Defiance” into dock (” Calendar of State Papers,” Domestic, 1665-66, pp. 252, 262, 324).

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Mr. Castle's new third-rate ship, which is to be called the Defyance"

See 11 January 1664/65: "to Gresham College to my Lord Brunker and Commissioner Pett, taking, Mr. Castle with me there to discourse over his draught of a ship he is to build for us." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/01/11/

jean-paul   Link to this

"However musique and women i cannot but give way to, whatever my business is."
Love you, Samuel!

Arthur Perry   Link to this

Why does Sam feel so much guilt for having some fun now and then?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"However musique and women I cannot but give way to, whatever my business is."

Innocent enough did we not know of Ms. Bagwell...Not to mention little Frances Tooker. Hard to believe sometimes this lovable, charming fellow worrying about his love of a few pleasures is a man coldly pressuring a subordinate's wife for sex...And whether or not Ms. B is the innocent lamb she portrays or rather more sophisticated and scheming, on his side it's abuse of power and office, and an abuse he's not unaware of, regardless of the difference in viewpoint of his era.

Well, ok...Sam Pepys is never cold about anything...But his campaign ala Bagwell was and is very calculated and unfeeling.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to Deptford, where I met my Lord Bruncker and Sir W. Batten by agreement, and to measuring Mr. Castle’s new third-rate ship....my end in saving the King some money and getting myself some experience in knowing how they do measure ships. "

L&M remind us that Pepys had visited the vexed subject of measuring ships by tonnage on 28 December 1664: "I abroad with Sir W. Batten to the Council Chamber, where all of us to discourse about the way of measuring ships and the freight fit to give for them by the tun, where it was strange methought to hear so poor discourses among the Lords themselves, and most of all to see how a little empty matter delivered gravely by Sir W. Pen was taken mighty well, though nothing in the earth to the purpose." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/12/28/ They note Pepys thereafter wrote a memo that he claimed, in 1683, was basis of a Council order on the matter that was in force for over a generation.

Mary   Link to this

"getting myself some experience in knowing how they do measure ships."

Revenons a nos moutons, Sam. It seems like a long time since the man showed interest and delight in acquiring some of the technical knowledge attached to ships and ship-building.

GrahamT   Link to this

“However musique and women i cannot but give way to..."
...and the wine Sam, to go with the women and song.

cgs   Link to this

Samuell was never satisfied, because 'e 'ad 'is Masters Degree, paid for [true] , that 'e dinae need anymore book learning, nae 'e 'ad an henquiring mind, he did, our Samuell.

Greed be rife then as it is now, thus one man asking embarrassing questions how the scales be tipped in favour of the schemer,the nosy one was always frowned upon, but as Samuell did have all correct answers thus he not be the one that be decorating the London bridge.
The plimsole line not be thought of at this time, and as always there always be those that be looking for getting paid 500 quid for toilets that be worth 10.

Caveat Emptor.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"However musique and women I cannot but give way to, whatever my business is."

I have found my epitaph. Thank you, Sam.

"Why does Sam feel so much guilt for having some fun now and then?"

It's the Puritan in him, Arthur. Or perhaps it's human nature -- I often am conscious of the tug of war between my Id and Superego ... gives my Ego something to do, I suppose...

A. Hamilton   Link to this

"It seems a long time..."

My reaction exactly, Mary.

“However musique and women I cannot but give way to, whatever my business is.”

Low animal noises of "Hear, Hear" from the back benches.

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