Friday 19 May 1665

Up, and to White Hall, where the Committee for Tangier met, and there, though the case as to the merit of it was most plain and most of the company favourable to our business, yet it was with much ado that I got the business not carried fully against us, but put off to another day, my Lord Arlington being the great man in it, and I was sorry to be found arguing so greatly against him. The business I believe will in the end be carried against us, and the whole business fall; I must therefore endeavour the most I can to get money another way. It vexed me to see Creed so hot against it, but I cannot much blame him, having never declared to him my being concerned in it. But that that troubles me most is my Lord Arlington calls to me privately and asks me whether I had ever said to any body that I desired to leave this employment, having not time to look after it. I told him, No, for that the thing being settled it will not require much time to look after it. He told me then he would do me right to the King, for he had been told so, which I desired him to do, and by and by he called me to him again and asked me whether I had no friend about the Duke, asking me (I making a stand) whether Mr. Coventry was not my friend. I told him I had received many friendships from him. He then advised me to procure that the Duke would in his next letter write to him to continue me in my place and remove any obstruction; which I told him I would, and thanked him. So parted, vexed at the first and amazed at this business of my Lord Arlington’s. Thence to the Exchequer, and there got my tallys for 17,500l., the first payment I ever had out of the Exchequer, and at the Legg spent 14s. upon my old acquaintance, some of them the clerks, and away home with my tallys in a coach, fearful every step of having one of them fall out, or snatched from me. Being come home, I much troubled out again by coach (for company taking Sir W. Warren with me), intending to have spoke to my Lord Arlington to have known the bottom of it, but missed him, and afterwards discoursing the thing as a confidant to Sir W. Warren, he did give me several good hints and principles not to do anything suddenly, but consult my pillow upon that and every great thing of my life, before I resolve anything in it. Away back home, and not being fit for business I took my wife and Mercer down by water to Greenwich at 8 at night, it being very fine and cool and moonshine afterward. Mighty pleasant passage it was; there eat a cake or two, and so home by 10 or 11 at night, and then to bed, my mind not settled what to think.

10 Annotations

Carl in Boston   Link to this

Sir W. Warren, he did give me several good hints and principles not to do anything suddenly, but consult my pillow upon that and every great thing of my life, before I resolve anything in it.
Teenage and 21 year old hotheads can't understand this, I couldn't, but it is sound advice from our Great Leader. We read in Isaiah 30:15 "In quietness and confidence shall be our strength" and it is so odd to think and yet so true. Abraham Lincoln said much the same.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I was sorry to be found arguing so greatly against [Lord Arlington]"

-- perhaps not least because he was close to the King and of "pleasant and agreeable humour" (so the Wikipedia article about him).

Interesting (and vexing indeed) how Lord Arlington tests Pepys's bona fides, though they've been together on the Tangier Commission for a long while.

tg   Link to this

"It vexed me to see Creed so hot against it, but I cannot much blame him, having never declared to him my being concerned in it."
Despite the "pillow time" with John Creed, our Sam still has many tentacles in the fire that come up against his friend and rival.

Ira   Link to this

"consult my pillow" - Is this the Restoration-era equivalent of sleeping on it?

Jonathan Addleman   Link to this

I love that expression! I'm going to consult my pillow about all sorts of things tonight.

andy   Link to this

whether I had ever said to any body that I desired to leave this employment

Always a rather pointed question in my experience! An enemy makes himself known: Sam has to prove his leadership qualities now. Good advice from Warren.

Ruben   Link to this

"in quietness and in confidence shall be your strength"
The Prophet's words sound good but what to do with the continuation?
"in quietness and in confidence shall be your strength: and ye would not."
I do not know.

Phil   Link to this

"But that that troubles me most is my Lord Arlington calls to me privately and asks me whether I had ever said to any body that I desired to leave this employment, having not time to look after it."

Whodunit? A subtle rumour which could cost Sam his job. There is no question Sam has been busy but nowhere in his diary, thus far, has he ever made a negative remark about the time he invests in the Tangier account. The person who planted the false seed of discontent would appear to be someone with an axe to grind or someone who covet Sam's job.

Could it be Povy trying to get back his old job? I'm thinking it's someone who had direct access to the King's ear...someone like Sir G. Carteret. Perhaps Carteret got wind of the Sam / Sir Philip Warwicke conversations of May 3/65 and Apr 18/65.

It is amazing how Sam comes across in his diary as a person who wishes no harm on anyone, expects fair play and honour and yet, when you think about his past writings, has developed enemies galore.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hard to imagine a thief could make good use of the tallys unless for ransom back to the government. Surely no merchant or innkeeper would accept one as payment-the one knowing all too well what they were and that they must be stolen, the other seeing only a notched stick presented to him.

Mary   Link to this

Worries about losing tallies.

But think how very awkward, even dangerous, it would be to lose one! Sam would then have lost the prime official record of the sums of money approved. The whole point about tallies is that one has to tally with another. Sam could swear as much as he liked that he was giving a true account of his dealings, but if he couldn't produce his corroborating tally then he wouldn't have a leg to stand on. What price his career then?

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