Monday 26 October 1663

Waked about one o’clock in the morning …. My wife being waked rung her bell, and the mayds rose and went to washing, we to sleep again till 7 o’clock, and then up, and I abroad to look out Dr. Williams, but being gone out I went to Westminster, and there seeing my Lord Sandwich’s footman knew he was come to town, and so I went in and saw him, and received a kind salute from him, but hear that my father is very ill still. Thence to Westminster Hall with Creed, and spent the morning walking there, where, it being Terme time, I met several persons, and talked with them, among others Dr. Pierce, who tells me that the Queen is in a way to be pretty well again, but that her delirium in her head continues still; that she talks idle, not by fits, but always, which in some lasts a week after so high a fever, in some more, and in some for ever; that this morning she talked mightily that she was brought to bed, and that she wondered that she should be delivered without pain and without spueing or being sicke, and that she was troubled that her boy was but an ugly boy. But the King being by, said, “No, it is a very pretty boy.” — “Nay,” says she, “if it be like you it is a fine boy indeed, and I would be very well pleased with it.” The other day she talked mightily of Sir H. Wood’s lady’s great belly, and said if she should miscarry he would never get another, and that she never saw such a man as this Sir H. Wood in her life, and seeing of Dr. Pridgeon, she said, “Nay, Doctor, you need not scratch your head, there is hair little enough already in the place.” But methinks it was not handsome for the weaknesses of Princes to be talked of thus. Thence Creed and I to the King’s Head ordinary, where much and very good company, among others one very talking man, but a scholler, that would needs put in his discourse and philosophy upon every occasion, and though he did well enough, yet his readiness to speak spoilt all. Here they say that the Turkes go on apace, and that my Lord Castlehaven is going to raise 10,000 men here for to go against him; that the King of France do offer to assist the Empire upon condition that he may be their Generalissimo, and the Dolphin chosen King of the Romans: and it is said that the King of France do occasion this difference among the Christian Princes of the Empire, which gives the Turke such advantages. They say also that the King of Spayne is making all imaginable force against Portugall again. Thence Creed and I to one or two periwigg shops about the Temple, having been very much displeased with one that we saw, a head of greasy and old woman’s haire, at Jervas’s in the morning; and there I think I shall fit myself of one very handsomely made. Thence by coach, my mind being troubled for not meeting with Dr. Williams, to St. Catharine’s to look at a Dutch ship or two for some good handsome maps, but met none, and so back to Cornhill to Moxon’s, but it being dark we staid not to see any, then to coach again, and presently spying Sir W. Batten; I ‘light and took him in and to the Globe in Fleete Streete, by appointment, where by and by he and I with our solicitor to Sir E Turner about Field’s business, and back to the Globe, and thither I sent for Dr. Williams, and he is willing to swear in my behalf against T. Trice, viz., that at T. Trice’s desire we have met to treat about our business. Thence (I drinking no wine) after an hour’s stay Sir W. Batten and another, and he drinking, we home by coach, and so to my office and set down my Journall, and then home to supper and to bed, my washing being in a good condition over. I did give Dr. Williams 20s. tonight, but it was after he had answered me well to what I had to ask him about this business, and it was only what I had long ago in my petty bag book allotted for him besides the bill of near 4l. which I paid him a good while since by my brother Tom for physique for my wife, without any consideration to this business that he is to do for me, as God shall save me. Among the rest, talking of the Emperor at table to- day one young gentleman, a pretty man, and it seems a Parliament man, did say that he was a sot; for he minded nothing of the Government, but was led by the Jesuites. Several at table took him up, some for saying that he was a sot in being led by the Jesuites, [who] are the best counsel he can take. Another commander, a Scott[ish] Collonell, who I believe had several under him, that he was a man that had thus long kept out the Turke till now, and did many other great things, and lastly Mr. Progers, one of our courtiers, who told him that it was not a thing to be said of any Soveraigne Prince, be his weaknesses what they will, to be called a sot, which methinks was very prettily said.

29 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"Waked about one a-clock in the morning to piss (having gone so soon over-night to bed) and then my wife, being waked, rung her bell...." transcribe L&M.

MissAnn   Link to this

"... and the Dolphin chosen King of the Romans ..."
- could the "dolphin" actually be "Dauphin", i.e. the eldest son of the King of France (1349-1830)?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...without any consideration to this business that he is to do for me, as God shall save me..." Hmmn...Sam anxious even in the Diary to appear spotless in the Trice business? Or to better effect rehearsing his testimony that Dr. W is an unbiased witness?

Of course one could still mention that having received 4 pounds and 20s from Sam over the course of time, the good Dr. might just possibly be inclined to take a friendly view of his side.

***
"Unless the Dolphin be present..."

"For the...Dauphin. I speak for him."

-Henry V

Could Sam be having a little Shakespearian fun at the Dauphin's expense? Surely he, like Will S., knows it's Dauphin. Though I suppose it's just rushed spelling...

But it would be neat to learn he was.

Bradford   Link to this

"Mr. Progers, one of our courtiers, who told him that it was not a thing to be said of any Soveraigne Prince, be his weaknesses what they will, to be called a sot". There are no such scruples about the truth nowadays. ---But I must take care not to be like the scholar who, "though he did well enough, yet his readiness to speak spoilt all."
Note that the periwig hunt, to be concluded next month, has begun; and anyone who hasn't read Jeannine on the Queen's Illness, repair this omission, the better to compare and contrast the version Pepys gives.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Several at table took him up, some for saying that he was a sot in being led by the Jesuites, [who] are the best counsel he can take. Another commander, a Scott[ish] Collonell, who I believe had several under him, that he was a man that had thus long kept out the Turke till now, and did many other great things, and lastly Mr. Progers, one of our courtiers, who told him that it was not a thing to be said of any Soveraigne Prince, be his weaknesses what they will, to be called a sot, which methinks was very prettily said."

Word of your English graciousness shall be sent on to the Vatican, Samuel.

***
Mr. Prodgers?

This will bear some thought...

Lea   Link to this

"Could Sam be having a little Shakespearian fun at the Dauphin's expense? Surely he, like Will S., knows it's Dauphin. Though I suppose it's just rushed spelling..."

"Dolphin" was a very common English spelling of "Dauphin" though, possibly even more common than the French spelling -- after all, it's a simple translation (the tendency in some productions of the histories to distinguish between the English and French pronunciations is a modern one, though apt enough). In 16th-/17th-c English pronunciation the two would probably have been pronounced alike anyway.

The title refers to the heraldic dolphin and derives from the coat of arms of the Comte de Vienne, who sold his title to the French king in 1349 on condition that the heir to the throne adopt those arms.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Dolphin and Dauphin
Lea, what a wonderful annotation. Thank you!

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"...my washing being in a good condition over."
Wonder if the maids got their trip to Westminster?

Patricia   Link to this

"...one very talking man... that would needs put in his discourse and philosophy upon every occasion, and ... his readiness to speak spoilt all."
This is why I love the Diary: we've all met this guy, been bored by him, related it to somebody afterwards. Some things never change.

Patricia   Link to this

On the other hand, some things DO change, thank goodness: waking the maids up at 1 o'clock to start the day's washing!! What time do you suppose the poor girls got to bed the night before? And the washing is "in a good condition over" when Sam comes home for supper and to bed. And then they get the rest of the night off "to go see their friends at Westminster" as we learned yesterday.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Today's entry
seems uncommonly rambling and disjointed. He wrote it at the end of a busy day, so maybe he was tired. He mentions failed effort(s) to see Dr. Williams, but no contact, until he tacks on at the end that he paid Williams 20s.

Terry F   Link to this

Blame the continent's disarray on the French

Au contraire, the French are too...well, too dominant because self-centered; etc.

L&M say what "they say" the King's Head ordinary about my Lord Castlehaven's latest scheme is a rnor of an idle boast; the French did NOT offer forces conditionally, etc.

MissAnn   Link to this

Thank you Lea for the dolphin/dauphin information - now I understand. I had thought the translation from the shorthand was to blame, I know my shorthand could be translated to read just about anything nowadays.

Like Patricia I was amazed that the maids were woken at 1:00 a.m. to start the washing - and I bet they were not paid overtime for that either. Considering the labour intensive work required to get the washing all done in a day they must have been exhausted, but maybe not exhausted enough to give up seeing Westminster.

Loved Robert's little dissertation on "Bess and The Girls at Westminster" yesterday. Hope they had a great girls day on the town.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I dunno Terry, I think the Turk must be held responsible. Unless it's all a Vatican plot... (We Catholics must have our universal church...Comes from being one of the last two surviving institutions of the Roman Empire.)

"Your Holiness...I bring the latest news from our agents. The Turk advances...The Dutch are headed for conflict with their fellow heretics in England. As we hoped, all Europe is in ferment."

"Good, good. Soon the continent will see that the Universal Church is the only force that can bring peace...And Order...To the Christian world. See that our payments to the Sultan are made with our personal thanks."

jeannine   Link to this

Thanks for the great info Lea, but I think he said "Dolphin" instead of "Dauphin" on porpoise!

Ruben   Link to this

Waking the maids up at 1 o'clock to start the day's washing
First, you need a good fire, so you can warm the water. This make take hours. In the meantime you may go back to sleep.

alanB   Link to this

Jeannine, meanwhile, text message to Sam from the girls on the razz downtown,
'hving whale ofa time'

Terry F   Link to this

This entry's full of rumor

"Blame the continent's disarray on the French" - I writ sarcastically. Yes, Robert, the Turk is a real threat. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottoman_wars_in_Eu...

The tales of the Queen's delusion are SO poignant, whether true or not!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I know you were Terry, but knowing my own I was quite serious about the Vatican plotting...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

And I love Sam's inability to refrain from recording a juicy inside story even while denouncing such things. Interesting that there's no mention of her babbling in her own language.

JWB   Link to this

Mary & Henry Woods

The Queen was correct. The Woods had one child, Mary,in 1664, who grows up to marry Chas. Fitzroy, ChasII's bastard w/ Barbara Villiers.

b.timbrell   Link to this

What has happened to Pepys

Mary   Link to this

Pepys's whereabouts.

Phil has explained (About this site/Discussion Group) that he has had a very busy week this week, but will get the entries up-to-date again over the weekend. As always, the regulars thank him profoundly for all the work that he puts in on our behalf.

Ruben   Link to this

Those wanting to know without delay what was the next adventure of our inefable Pepys should try the Gutemberg library.
I promised myself never ro read but what appears in this site, day by day, in spite of knowing more or less what will happen. I enjoy not only Pepys but also the annotators that open my eyes to a lot of difficult pasages. Usually I read aloud this promise of mine every time I open Gutemberg or walk in the garden.
Whenever I develop withdrawal signs I look for consolation at the background information.
Another way to pass the difficult hours between entries is reading histories of Pepys times, making a pie or playing the piano at 6 am.
I also tried a warm beer for breakfast but I found cafe au lait was better.

wisteria53   Link to this

Mr Progers - maybe he is from Wales?

My Welsh husband says that most names starting with "Pr" started out as "ap R...", meaning "son of" (ap Richard becoming Pritchard, ap Rhys to Price, also ap Barry to Parry). An "s" at the end can also mean "son of", so perhaps Mr Progers is descended from someone who was the son of son of Rogers.

wisteria53   Link to this

....son of son of Roger....
So much for trying to proofread on a Blackberry before my morning cup of tea.

cum grano salis   Link to this

as long as he was not the lodger, seriously, name begotting is fascinating

celtcahill   Link to this

"Unless the Dolphin be present..."

"For the...Dauphin. I speak for him."

" -Henry V

Could Sam be having a little Shakespearian fun at the Dauphin's expense? Surely he, like Will S., knows it's Dauphin. Though I suppose it's just rushed spelling...

But it would be neat to learn he was."

I thought and think that In Henry V and here, it takes an insulting tone, especially as delivered by Brian Blessed; and that intentionally even when discussing him in a positive light, albeit gentler from Sam.

Mr Gertz: I remember reading 'Lead us into Temptation' by Sean O'Faolin who writes from the point of view of the last occupiers of the Roman Empire and who takes a few pages to make the reader aware the characters are two priests in an Irish pub.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I thought and think that In Henry V and here, it takes an insulting tone, especially as delivered by Brian Blessed; and that intentionally even when discussing him in a positive light, albeit gentler from Sam."

I'd like to think so...

And wasn't Blessed terrific in that scene? As was the young Finnes as the put-upon Dauphin.

Can't help wondering (if it's really intentional) if Sam might be venting a little resentment...Bess perhaps a little too overfond of praising France's heir's wonderful qualities?

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