Tuesday 30 June 1663

Up betimes yesterday and to-day, the sun rising very bright and glorious; and yet yesterday, as it hath been these two months and more, was a foul day the most part of the day. By and by by water to White Hall, and there to my Lord’s lodgings by appointment, whither Mr. Creed comes to me, having been at Chelsey this morning to fetch my Lord to St. James’s. So he and I to the Park, where we understand that the King and Duke are gone out betimes this morning on board the East India ships lately come in, and so our meeting appointed is lost. But he and I walked at the further end of the Park, not to be observed, whither by and by comes my Lord Sandwich, and he and we walked two hours and more in the Park and then in White Hall Gallery, and lastly in White Hall garden, discoursing of Mr. Creed’s accounts, and how to answer the Treasurer’s objections. I find that the business is 500l. deep, the advantage of Creed, and why my Lord and I should be concerned to promote his profit with so much dishonour and trouble to us I know not, but however we shall do what we can, though he deserves it not, for there is nothing even to his own advantage that can be got out of him, but by mere force. So full of policy he is in the smallest matters, that I perceive him to be made up of nothing but design. I left him here, being in my mind vexed at the trouble that this business gets me, and the distance that it makes between Sir G. Carteret and myself, which I ought to avoyd. Thence by water home and to dinner, and afterwards to the office, and there sat till evening, and then I by water to Deptford to see Sir W. Pen, who lies ill at Captain Rooth’s, but in a way to be well again this weather, this day being the only fair day we have had these two or three months. Among other discourse I did tell him plainly some of my thoughts concerning Sir W. Batten. and the office in general, upon design for him to understand that I do mind things and will not balk to take notice of them, that when he comes to be well again he may know how to look upon me. Thence homeward walked, and in my way met Creed coming to meet me, and then turned back and walk a while, and so to boat and home by water, I being not very forward to talk of his business, and he by design the same, to see how I would speak of it, but I did not, but in general terms, and so after supper with general discourse to bed and sleep. Thus, by God’s blessing, ends this book of two years; I being in all points in good health and a good way to thrive and do well. Some money I do and can lay up, but not much, being worth now above 700l., besides goods of all sorts. My wife in the country with Ashwell, her woman, with my father; myself at home with W. Hewer and my cooke-maid Hannah, my boy Wayneman being lately run away from me. In my office, my repute and understanding good, especially with the Duke and Mr. Coventry; only the rest of the officers do rather envy than love me, I standing in most of their lights, specially Sir W. Batten, whose cheats I do daily oppose to his great trouble, though he appears mighty kind and willing to keep friendship with me, while Sir J. Minnes, like a dotard, is led by the nose by him. My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority. Publique matters are in an ill condition; Parliament sitting and raising four subsidys for the King, which is but a little, considering his wants; and yet that parted withal with great hardness. They being offended to see so much money go, and no debts of the publique’s paid, but all swallowed by a luxurious Court: which the King it is believed and hoped will retrench in a little time, when he comes to see the utmost of the revenue which shall be settled on him: he expecting to have his 1,200,000l. made good to him, which is not yet done by above 150,000l., as he himself reports to the House. My differences with my uncle Thomas at a good quiett, blessed be God! and other matters. The town full of the great overthrow lately given to the Spaniards by the Portugalls, they being advanced into the very middle of Portugall. The weather wet for two or three months together beyond belief, almost not one fair day coming between till this day, which has been a very pleasant [day] and the first pleasant [day] this summer. The charge of the Navy intended to be limited to 200l.,000 per annum, the ordinary charge of it, and that to be settled upon the Customs. The King yet greatly taken up with Madam Castlemaine and Mrs. Stewart, which God of Heaven put an end to! Myself very studious to learn what I can of all things necessary for my place as an officer of the Navy, reading lately what concerns measuring of timber and knowledge of the tides. I have of late spent much time with Creed, being led to it by his business of his accounts, but I find him a fellow of those designs and tricks, that there is no degree of true friendship to be made with him, and therefore I must cast him off, though he be a very understanding man, and one that much may be learned of as to cunning and judging of other men. Besides, too, I do perceive more and more that my time of pleasure and idleness of any sort must be flung off to attend to getting of some money and the keeping of my family in order, which I fear by my wife’s liberty may be otherwise lost.

14 Annotations

TerryF   Link to this

"Thus, by God's blessing, ends this book of two years;"

At the end of today's entry L&M note this was the last in the second MS volume of Pepys's Diary.

Bradford   Link to this

"So full of policy he is in the smallest matters, that I perceive him to be made up of nothing but design."

Pot recognizes Kettle.

"My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority. . . . I do perceive more and more that my time of pleasure and idleness of any sort must be flung off to attend to getting of some money and the keeping of my family in order, which I fear by my wife’s liberty may be otherwise lost."

The Workaholic's Dilemma: Love or Money?

TerryF   Link to this

Pot has mixed feelings about kettle: sees it's too big to handle, but admires its style.

The views of today have come quickly to a boil:

Eight days ago, Monday 22 , Pepys judged Creed as "so knowing, and a man of that reason, that I cannot but love his company, though I do not love the man, because he is too wise to be made a friend of, and acts all by interest and policy, but is a man fit to learn of." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/06/22/

Five days ago, Thursday 25, Pepys, now coöpted into putting Creed's accounts in order, wrote: "I am pleased to see with what secret cunning and variety of artifice this Creed has carried on his business.even unknown to me [and] unobserved out of the Controller’s [Mennes's] hand...[...] Sir George Carteret at the office (after dinner, and Creed being gone, for both now and yesterday I was afraid to have him seen by Sir G. Carteret with me, for fear that he should increase his doubt that I am of a plot with Creed in the business of his accounts) "
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/06/25/

I withdraw Thursday's reservation about the accounts' irregularity.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/06/25/#c52994

Xjy   Link to this

Marx once remarked that a bourgeois man (husband) was a machine for making money. Sam is seeing this as a greater and greater priority.
Marx also wrote (in Capital I ch 3) "Sie wissen das nicht, aber sie tun es." "They don't know (what it is they're doing), but they do it (anyway)." Sam accepts the society he finds himself in, and is compelled to respond to its pressures and imperatives. He is good at knowing and learning the operational and tactical skills he needs, but at a loss when it comes to the bigger historical, social and human picture - but his curiosity and relative openness in the diary lead him to record his response to many of the contradictions all this leads him into, to our great benefit and enlightenment.
To get an idea of people with an eye to the bigger picture, Macchiavelli and Hobbes can't be beaten.

Roger   Link to this

'and yet yesterday, as it hath been these two months and more, was a foul day the most part of the day'.

It's gems like this that are so useful to present day climatologists etc. Records gleaned from Pepys, Jocelyn and hundreds of others have helped build up a picture of the weather over the earlier centuries(before regular, formal weather observations)that puts present day 'climate change' into context. Wet spells in late spring/early summer are not unusual even now(though not just recently). 1663 has not been recorded as having any unusual weather, other than by Pepys(as far as I know). Droughts were common place in the 1650's whilst 1664 was noted for it's thunderstorms. The drought of August and September 1666 will have contributed to the Great Fire.

refs,
London Weather, JH Brazell 1968 HMSO.
A general chronological history of the air, weather, seasons, meteors, 1749. Dr Thomas Short.
Historic droughts, Symond's British Rainfall 1888, GJ Symonds.

language hat   Link to this

"but however we shall do what we can, though he deserves it not"

Why exactly do they feel compelled to help Creed out?

"this day being the only fair day we have had these two or three months"

I feel your pain, Sam. It's been just like that here in Massachusetts.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: Why exactly do they feel compelled to help Creed out?

Despite the fact that Sam wonders "why my Lord and I should be concerned to promote his profit with so much dishonour and trouble to us," I think there may be something in this for Sandwich (remember our discussions the other day about annuities ... perhaps Sandwich is trying to plump up Creed's accounts so he may one day be able to draw upon them?), and also believe there is something in it for Sam, in that he reinforces his relationships with both Sandwich and Creed, however distasteful the means are to him.

I love these "summation entries." Sam's brilliance as a writer really comes through in them -- they're so coherent and concise.

in Aqua epistula   Link to this

Why did England pick this week for padling a fluffy ball across the net for the championship?
The walk around the sundial has rained out again."...and yet yesterday, as it hath been these two months and more, was a foul day the most part of the day.."
Why help Creed? He has money in his trust for an account [Sandwich], would like to see the money grow, and then be able to tell his client, that he has done well, by looking after the money well, and there be a good rate of exchange so he has made a profit [and of course me [Creed]too].
When thee do work [favour] for anyone thee would like to receive some benefits, for thy good work[deed], Co mingling of monies was normal but then this was the beginning of understanding of the power of monies, before this, it was all the kings, Like Chas I the decider thought, but the market makers saw it differently.
Investments and incomes from estate rents, collective ownership of ships to bring home the baccy, sucre, lucre, herbs,etc., the word be profits, so thy estate man was investing on sure? deals. Salaries were only for the bread , the perks be the way to get thy country estate and if enough, it get thee a title to top it off.
as Noted when thee have the brass, thee can do no wrong.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I think Sam is still very much aware how quickly milord Sandwich could crumple him up and toss him into a wastebin and so despite his deep misgivings he must follow a polite request, (instructions, flat-out orders) to help Creed out. The real question is what Creed is doing for (or has on) milord to cause Sandwich to make such effort on his behalf. My guess is Creed's accounts are merely a cover. Sandwich has been anxiously waiting for Charles to pay on his own accounts from the Portugal mission for some time now and having realized he is not likely to see the money in this life he has had Creed create and pad his personal account with extremely dubious fudge work. Creed's personal accounts can be presented to the Navy rather than to the Crown and there is a reasonable chance of getting something back (thanks to Parliament feeling obliged to fund the Royal Navy for some silly reason-patriotism, self-defense, their nephew's a sailor boy.), a hefty percentage of which Sandwich will take in lieu of what he's owed by the Crown.

It may also be that this is a stalking horse for Sandwich's own account to be presented to the Navy instead of the Crown. If Creed's account is ok'd for payment by the Naval Office, milord's accounts will stand a good chance of going through by that route. In either case, Creed gets well taken care of while Sandwich bypasses Charlie's extremely sticky fingers and finally gets some of his long-delayed payoff. Should this scheme fail...My Lord Sandwich will disavow any knowledge of his greedy servant's disreputable actions.

And what does our Sam get for potentially being number two fall-guy?

Why the honor of serving his generous cousin, milord Sandwich...And maybe a few dozen loose pounds.

language hat   Link to this

Well analyzed, Lord Gertz. Much obliged!

Susan   Link to this

"My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority."

What caused the rift between Mr. Pepys and his wife? Or was it just typical of men of his century?

jeannine   Link to this

"What caused the rift between Mr. Pepys and his wife? Or was it just typical of men of his century?"

Susan, Sam has always been plagued by his "jealousy". Before the diary began there was some incident (never really detailed) where his jealousy caused Elizabeth to leave him for awhile. Sam refers to it as "that old business" and it seems like that "something" (most likely just flirting??) happened with Elizabeth and perhaps Captain Robert Holmes. From time to time Sam will allude to this in the diary. Elizabeth's leaving him was extremely painful to him and still remains a point that he can't bear to think about.
More recently when Elizabeth took dancing lessons Sam became jealous of the dancing teacher Pembleton and that caused some hard words between the two. This is (and most likely will be) an ongoing issue in their marriage. Elizabeth is beautiful and Sam wants to be sure that she is 100% faithful to him, even if he is not faithful to her.
Also, there definitely is a "double standard" during the reign of Charles II and morals were loose (if they existed at all for some of Charles' pals). Although not quite yet in the Court of Charles II, Lord Rochester will come forth as a well known rake and rogue along with most of Charles II’s male companions. He will enter the court of Charles II and in many ways Charles will be a father figure and highly influential in shaping young Rochester’s values and concepts of male-female relationships. In his book, “the Profane Wit” Johnson gives a sharp summary of the view of women per Rochester, but this description is so highly applicable to many of the courtiers that it’s a pertinent to the environment of the court at the time and the "fears" that Sam might have had in regards to someone going after his wife. As Johnson explains (p 67)… “ Like his male contemporaries, young Rochester held to a sexual double standard. It was a man’s nature to crave variety. Virtuous young women who refused his advances were cruel and unkind. If a woman succumbed, however, she was a broken toy, fit only to be tossed aside; she had lost her virtue. A woman who played the man’s game of inconsistency was a slut and a whore, deserving his contempt. To marry such a woman was unthinkable – unless a man wanted to risk leaving his property to another man’s bastard. A husband was not expected to be faithful; his wife, of course, was.”

in Aqua epistula   Link to this

Until the species can share, rather than play one upmanship, Democracy will only live as dream. All that we read of this century [XVII] set the tone or stage for the attempt to be democratic in four more generations. Women will read the books for themselves rather than listen to the preachers version, men will find that other men only think of money, pleasures and power and how to disenfranchise others.
Just in 3 years since Charles said that he would consider others, but now that he has his secret stash [thanks to the Sun King] can revert to his sense of pleasures, and Women see that it be best to get an education so that they will never be doormats, unless they have some leverage [***]. Palmer vs Stewart, for share of the kings ransom.
The game of chance to have equality, be played out on all levels of society.

Patricia   Link to this

“What caused the rift between Mr. Pepys and his wife?" I would go further back and say that the trouble started with the row they had in January, when he tore up his love letters to her, having already demonstrated that he doesn't care about her feelings by refusing to read a certain letter she had written him. Don't get me started on that--it was disgraceful, and I doubt she will ever be able to forget it.

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