Monday 17 February 1661/62

This morning, both Sir Williams, myself, and Captain Cocke and Captain Tinker of the Convertine, which we are going to look upon (being intended to go with these ships fitting for the East Indys), down to Deptford; and thence, after being on shipboard, to Woolwich, and there eat something. The Sir Williams being unwilling to eat flesh,1 Captain Cocke and I had a breast of veal roasted. And here I drank wine upon necessity, being ill for want of it, and I find reason to fear that by my too sudden leaving off wine, I do contract many evils upon myself. Going and coming we played at gleeke, and I won 9s. 6d. clear, the most that ever I won in my life. I pray God it may not tempt me to play again. Being come home again we went to the Dolphin, where Mr. Alcock and my Lady and Mrs. Martha Batten came to us, and after them many others (as it always is where Sir W. Batten goes), and there we had some pullets to supper. I eat though I was not very well, and after that left them, and so home and to bed.

  1. In Lent, of which the observance, intermitted for nineteen years, was now reviving. We have seen that Pepys, as yet, had not cast off all show of Puritanism. “In this month the Fishmongers’ Company petitioned the King that Lent might be kept, because they had provided abundance of fish for this season, and their prayer was granted.”—Rugge.—B.

23 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

This day John Everlyn says...

"This night was buried in Westminster the Queene of Bohemia .& this night, & the next day fell such a storme of Haile, Thunder & lightning, as never was seene the like in any mans memorie….. so exceedingly was Gods hand against this ungratefull, vicious Nation, & Court.”

http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/1914/ed...

” against this ungratefull, vicious Nation, & Court.” The same court that Mr. Everlyn spends so much time hobnobbing with?

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"I pray God it may not tempt me to play again"
Paraphrasing Oscar Wild,SP can resist anything but temptation.

Glyn   Link to this

Who or what was a "Convertine"?

Pedro   Link to this

Convertine?

Probably a ship..

http://www.eicships.info/eic/ships/shipdetail.a...

trevor   Link to this

Glyn Asked:

Who or what was a "Convertine"?

It is the name of the shipped commanded by Captain Tinker. It was in the East India Trading Company fleet, but I couldn’t find too much about it.

This link below has few details, other than service period, but mabye other searches will find something else.

http://www.eicships.info/eic/ships/shipdetail.a...

Trevor

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...I find reason to fear that by my too sudden leaving off wine, I do contract many evils upon myself."

Uh-huh. Followed by...

"I eat though I was not very well..."

Sam, he who dost not see the hand of God in this... (As your young Mr. Penn, Jr. would probably point out.)

"...we went to the Dolphin, where Mr. Alcock and my Lady and Mrs. Martha Batten came to us, and after them many others (as it always is where Sir W. Batten goes)..." Sir Bill Batten, 1660's London's beloved party king (after the Stuart boys, naturally).

I hope the "we" meant Beth was included.

Pauline   Link to this

Uh-huh. Also followed by

I won 9s. 6d. clear, the most that ever I won in my life

JWB   Link to this

"...Fishmongers' Company petitioned the King that Lent might be kept…”
Reformation did to the Hanseatic League what Baltic pirates couldn’t.

vicenzo   Link to this

Covertine: most likely a newish boat with 56 guns

Ruben   Link to this

Convertine
a small ship. 44 guns. small 3rd Rate.
for more info and ilustrated (computer graphics)see:http://anglodutchwarsblog.com/Articles/Commentary/Commentary200404.html

Ruben   Link to this

Convertine
in another site I found another Convertine sold to the Portuguese in 1650.
http://www.kentishknock.com/j-n-c.htm
so the name probably was reused for "our " Convertine.
In another site:
http://www.mariners-l.co.uk/EICa-e.htm
with a list of Merchant Vessels in the Service of the East India Company, 1601-1832 the Convertine figures with 240 tons and one voyage in 1661. I presume this is "our" Convertine, later lost to the Dutch.

Ruben   Link to this

More about Convertine
a discussion about the 2 ships called Convertine in:
http://anglo-dutch-wars.blogspot.com/2004/07/en...

Ruben   Link to this

Une autre Convertine:
The French have something different to say about our Convertine:

"Roger TAYLOR: ...Au début de février 1661, un flibustier du même nom avait été mis aux fers pour piraterie, en compagnie de George Freebourne, Robert Martin, William Foxery et Jeremy Medlicoate, à bord du HMS Convertine, mouillant à Port Royal.” (see: http://www.oricom.ca/yarl/T/T.html )
and then:
“George FREEBOURNE : flibustier anglais.

En janvier 1661, ce capitaine débarqua en fraude à la Jamaïque la cargaison de l'une de ses prises, mais il fut arrêté par le gouverneur D'Oyley et envoyé, avec trois autres flibustiers, en Angleterre sur le HMS Convertine pour y être jugé pour piraterie.”
Mmmm…
So may be the ship was back from Jamaica or still better did not sail to Jamaica (the French used another calendar).
We know that the ship did only one voyage, so Pepys probably inspected the ship before it sailed to Jamaica.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Warrington has a note on the Convertine and calls it a fourth-rate of forty-eight guns. In 1665 it was commanded by Captain John Pierce.
By-the-way on this side of the North Sea we would say the ship was won by the Dutch.

Pedro   Link to this

"And here I drank wine upon necessity"

Will should have used this excuse when he was with Mr. Southerne and Homewood at the Dolphin, on the 6th of January.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

In the following list there is a Convertine which matches some descriptions: http://www.kotiposti.net/felipe/Netherland/Ship... . Not a lot of further details unfortunately. ('Covertine' is about half-way the list.

Glyn   Link to this

Is there any internal logic at all as to how English ships were/are named? Probably not, because a lot of them were converted merchant ships. (I think that there is for American naval ships, though I don't know what its specifics are.)

Perhaps languagehat or another multi-linguist might explain the derivation of "Convertine", because I don't believe it to be an English word or English surname. The English navy did use foreign names for their ships, so is this one of them?

Susanna   Link to this

Convertine

The OED lists "convertine" as meaning "inclined to be converted," an obsolete and rare word, with one citation, from 1608.

john lauer   Link to this

Well then, how appropriate, if it had been converted!

E   Link to this

Ships' names
There is more than you may want to now about the current method of naming British Royal Navy ships in an article from the Navy News. The headline is "Long odds on HMS Death Star".
http://www.navynews.co.uk/articles/2002/0207/00...

Rather more fun is a webpage about the logic of the families of names used by the RN, USN, and others; the USN having a straightforward system. Oddly enough this is on a science-fiction-role-playing-game website.

E   Link to this

Oops
That's "On the Naming of Ships" http://www.freelancetraveller.com/features/ship...

language hat   Link to this

the derivation of "Convertine":

It is in fact both an English word (as Susanna explains) and a surname (if you google it you’ll find a number of examples); it’s obviously related to the word “convert,” but whether the ship’s name comes from a vocabulary item or the surname is probably unknowable at this late date. The surname is rare enough that it’s not in any of my references, but the name Converse usually referred originally to a lay brother in a monastery who lived according to a less strict rule and did manual labor (although it sometimes referred to a convert from Judaism; in the 13th century there was a House of Converts for such people on the site of the present Public Records Office, which is why the earlier name of Chancery Lane was Convers Lane).

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Convertine -- 4th rate, 50-60 guns; Portuguese prize 1650; captured by Dutch 1666. [ L&M Index. ]

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