Sunday 7 October 1660

(Lord’s day). To White Hall on foot, calling at my father’s to change my long black cloak for a short one (long cloaks being now quite out); but he being gone to church, I could not get one, and therefore I proceeded on and came to my Lord before he went to chapel and so went with him, where I heard Dr. Spurstow preach before the King a poor dry sermon; but a very good anthem of Captn. Cooke’s afterwards.

Going out of chapel I met with Jack Cole, my old friend (whom I had not seen a great while before), and have promised to renew acquaintance in London together. To my Lord’s and dined with him; he all dinner time talking French to me, and telling me the story how the Duke of York hath got my Lord Chancellor’s daughter with child, and that she, do lay it to him, and that for certain he did promise her marriage, and had signed it with his blood, but that he by stealth had got the paper out of her cabinet. And that the King would have him to marry her, but that he will not.1 So that the thing is very bad for the Duke, and them all; but my Lord do make light of it, as a thing that he believes is not a new thing for the Duke to do abroad. Discoursing concerning what if the Duke should marry her, my Lord told me that among his father’s many old sayings that he had wrote in a book of his, this is one—that he that do get a wench with child and marry her afterwards is as if a man should –- in his hat and then clap it on his head.

I perceive my Lord is grown a man very indifferent in all matters of religion, and so makes nothing of these things.

After dinner to the Abbey, where I heard them read the church- service, but very ridiculously, that indeed I do not in myself like it at all. A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lamb’s, one of the prebends, in his habit, came afterwards, and so all ended, and by my troth a pitiful sorry devotion that these men pay.

So walked home by land, and before supper I read part of the Marian persecution in Mr. Fuller. So to supper, prayers, and to bed.

  1. The Duke of York married Anne Hyde, and he avowed the marriage September 3rd, so that Pepys was rather behindhand in his information.

26 Annotations

Nix   Link to this

fn "Pepys was rather behindhand in his information" --

But Montague apparently was unaware of the marriage as well. Did James must "avow" it quietly?

vincent   Link to this

Oh! to be in the fashion I do believe. Can't be seen dead in this old thing.. oh wow!"...to change my long black cloak for a short one (long cloaks being now quite out); but he being gone to church, I could not get one, and therefore I proceeded on..."

Paul Brewster   Link to this

it is as if a man should shit in his hat
per L&M

Paul Brewster   Link to this

that endeed I do not in my mind like it at all
L&M: "my mind" replaces "myself"

Paul Brewster   Link to this

in Mr. Fuller
per L&M: Thomas Fuller, "The church-history of Britain"

Paul Brewster   Link to this

And that the King would have him to marry her, but that he will not.
L&M: "Much of this is fabrication. Anne Hyde had secretly married the Duke at her father's house on 3 September; a son was born on 22 October. The Duke had entered a contract of marriage in November 1659. Sandwich was using French in front of the servant. For the public acknowledgement of the marriage [we'll have to wait until the 21st of December]."

vincent   Link to this

Lasses ye never learn , see yer Lawyer first, and get that pre nup. I'm told 1/3 of those that turn up at the alter (to the church on time )have provern fertile.[see C. Hill page 312 WTUD][see restoration London p159/160 and 224"...he did promise her marriage, and had signed it with his blood, but that he by stealth had got the paper out of her cabinet..."

Paul Brewster   Link to this

I heard Dr. Spurstow preach before the King a poor dry sermon
L&M footnote: "William Spurstowe, a leading Presbyterian minister; recently made chaplain to the King. This was the only occasion on which he preached in the Chapel Royal." I guess the King shared SP's opinion.

Mary   Link to this

.. that he had wrote in a book of his....

It sounds as if either Sandwich or his father (not clear who 'his' refers to) kept a commonplace book. I wonder if it survives anywhere?

Mary   Link to this

... had signed it with his blood....

This sounds like a rumour-monger's embellishment of the breaking story of the marriage between Anne Hyde and James, a marriage which was to excite great jealousies in the future.

steve h   Link to this

pepys evolving piety

Two bad sermons, ptiful and ridiculous devotion, his patron's growing indiffernce to religion, reading Fuller on the Protestant martyrs in private. It seems Sam is undergoing some serious examination of his religiouc life in light of the Restoration and his evolving status.

Grahamt   Link to this

"long cloaks are now quite out, darling"
Could be straight out of Ab Fab. Delightful how the power of fashion doesn't change... and this after years of puritanism.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lamb's, one of the prebends, in his habit, came afterwards…”

Could someone help parse this for me? I looked up “prebend” at dictionary.com, and found this:

1) A stipend drawn from the endowment or revenues of an Anglican cathedral or church by a presiding member of the clergy; a cathedral or church benefice.

2) The property or tithe providing the endowment for such a stipend.

3) A prebendary.

Doesn’t help me much … perhaps someone with access to the OED can help? Also, is he referring to Dr. Lamb, or to another person who “came afterwards”? It looks like the latter, but given the strange sentence structure and unknown word I can’t be sure.

Great diary entry, btw … full of fashion notes, gossip and intrigue, and disillusionment. Life in the big city, eh?

Paul Brewster   Link to this

that he had writ in a book of his
L&M aren't much help. The footnote says simply, "Untraced".

Paul Brewster   Link to this

A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lambs, one of the Prebends, in his habitt, came afterwards;
I'm not sure that the L&M punctuation clears the matter up. The use of the plural, "these men", in the sentence that follows could imply that Dr. Lamb and "one of the Prebends" are two individuals.

The L&M Companion doesn't help much here. It identifies Dr Lamb as a Canon of Westminster. In the OED, the meaning of canon and prebend are intertwined as can be seen in longish definition that follows:

prebend, n
[a. Of. prebende (14-15th c. in Littré), in earlier popular forms provende (12th c. in Littré), prevende, mod.F. prébende, ad. med.L. prébenda a pension (Cassiodorus), a daily pittance, an ecclesiastical living, prebend, prop. "things proper to be supplied", neut. pl. gerundive of L. prébere to offer, grant, furnish, supply, for préhibere (Plaut.), f. pré before, forth + habere to hold.]

1. The portion of the revenues of a cathedral or collegiate church granted to a canon or member of the chapter as his stipend. Also transf.

c1400 Plowman’s Tale … They han greet prebendes and dere, Some two or three, and some mo. 1480 Caxton Descr. Brit. … In pryuelege of clergy and in prebendes they knowleche hem selfe clerkis. 1502 W. Atkynson tr. De Imitatione … For a lytell fee or prebende great Iourneys & harde labours be take an hande for such wor[l]dly lordes. 1561 T. Norton Calvin’s Inst. … Daintie men, that get their living with singing, as Prebends, Canonships, Parsonages, and dignities, Chaplainships, and such other. 1607 Cowell Interpr., Prebend is the portion, which euery member, or Canon of a Cathedrall church receiueth in the right of his place, for his maintenance. Prebends be either simple, or with dignity. Simple Prebends be those, that haue no more but the reuenew toward their maintenance: Prebends with dignity are such, as haue some Iurisdiction annexed vnto them according to the diuers orders in euery seuerall church. 1845 Stephen Comm. Laws Eng. … Such canons, however, as are prebendaries, differ from such as are not, as having a prebend, or fixed portion of the rents and profits of the cathedral or collegiate church for their maintenance. 1852 Hook Ch. Dict. … Prebend is the stipend received by a prebendary. Hence the difference between a prebend and a canonry. A canonry was the right which a person had as a member of the chapter. A prebend was the right to receive certain revenues appropriated to the place.

Harry Seydoux   Link to this

A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lambs, one of the Prebends, in his habitt,

Todd's dictionary definition seems clear to me. The term prebend applies primarily to

1)" A stipend (remuneration) drawn from the endowment or revenues of an Anglican cathedral or church (in this case Westminster Abbey, presumably) by a presiding member of the clergy"

and

2) "The property or tithe providing the endowment for such a stipend", i.e. the source of the stipend

It is also an abbreviated form for

3) "A prebendary", the beneficiary of the stipend.

In other words Dr Lambs is a prebendary (or canon)of Westminster Abbey

.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Thanks, Paul and Harry. That helps.

Mary   Link to this

.. came afterwards...

I think that what 'came afterwards' was the poor, dry sermon. It followed the reading of the church-service, i.e. the formally prescribed sequence of prayers and petitions for the afternoon devotions. Ritual finished and sermon delivered, 'so all ended'.

I'm less sure about the meaning of 'in his habit'. The most common use of 'habit' at this date would still be 'attire, mode of dress' etc. However, the use of the word to signify 'custom, behavioural trait' has also been in use since the late 16th Century, and Pepys could be referring to the known tendency of Dr. Lamb to deliver uninspiring sermons.

Paul Brewster   Link to this

Habit
I think the "attire, mode of dress" usage is by far the more likely. A quick review of the on-line text shows that SP uses the word habit 27 other times over the course of the diary. On only three occasions does the meaning tend toward "custom, behavioural trait" and one of these is questionable.
Here are the two certain ones:
“Such a habit we have got this winter of lying long abed” and “my old habit of pleasure wakened”

When dealing with religious matters the usage invariably tends to ‘dress’.

JonTom Kittredge   Link to this

Habit
I'm with Mr Brewster, in that I think that the "mode of dress" is the most likely meaning here. Remember that the clergy have only recently, with the return of the old order, started to wear vestments again. SP has several times remarked on seeing a priest in a surplice or a bishop in a rochet, as these were new sights for him. I am guessing that is why he mentions Dr Lamb's "habit" here.

MikeW   Link to this

"A poor cold sermon of Dr. Lamb's, one of the prebends, in his habit, came afterwards, and so all ended, and by my troth a pitiful sorry devotion that these men pay” I took this to mean that after the sermon, Dr. Lamb gave his usual sales pich for people to donate money, which he is in the “habit” of doing after a sermon; hence the remarks of pity from Pepys.

vincent   Link to this

"Habit". I like Mike W's view point. The asking for more funding at the end of the Service. It does seem to go with "...and by my troth a pitiful sorry devotion that these men pay ..."
although Habit - clothing does also make sense, now that the church is back to the older traditional garments and vespers et al.

vincent   Link to this

"Mommy must be told and sweetened up" of Duke to Hyde's daughter"
J Evelyn Oct 7 do say"...There dind with me this day a french Count with Sir S:Tuke who came to take leave of me, being sent over to the Queene-Mother to breake [ 1-noted as 'To Divulge'] the Marriage of the Duke with the Daughter of Chancellor Hide; which the Queene would faine have undon; but it seemes matters were reconciled, upon greate offers of the the Chancellor to be friend the Queene, who was much indebted, & and was now to have the settlement of her affaire go thro his hand:..."
A little sweetness goes a long way, eh! wot?

Bill   Link to this

" I hear to-night that the Duke of York’s son is this day dead, which I believe will please every body; and I hear that the Duke and his Lady themselves are not much troubled at it."

The diary, May 6, 1661. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/05/06/

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

Bill: no more spoilers, please!

Those who, like me, are reading without foreknowledge do not wish to be told and those who are reading with foreknowledge do not need to be told

Bill   Link to this

Sorry, It seemed relevant. But I'll do better...

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