Saturday 8 August 1668

Up, and I walked out, and met Uncle Wight, whom I sent to last night, and Mr. Wight coming to see us, and I walked with them back to see my aunt at Katherine Hill, and there walked up and down the hill and places, about: but a dull place, but good ayre, and the house dull. But here I saw my aunt, after many days not seeing her — I think, a year or two; and she walked with me to see my wife. And here, at the Red Lyon, we all dined together, and mighty merry, and then parted: and we home to Fox Hall, where Fitzgerald and I ’light, and by water to White Hall, where the Duke of York being abroad, I by coach and met my wife, who went round, and after doing at the office a little, and finding all well at home, I to bed. I hear that Colbert, the French Ambassador, is come, and hath been at Court incognito. When he hath his audience, I know not.


13 Annotations

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Yea! Uncle Wight is back!!

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Hmmn...Ambassador Colbert is "incognito" but everyone knows he's here. Sounds about right.

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Bess "went round"?

"So, my dear...You refuse to provide your king...The most noble Louis...With the information on the English navy we requested." Colbert, grimly.

"Oui, Monsieur Col...Smith."

(Yes, lets pray remember I am incognito, woman.)

"I cannot betray Samuel...I love him."

"Foolish girl... France did not place you here for sentiment to rule. Much as we understand the affairs of the heart. Your task is to destroy the one man who might yet save England from falling into the clutches of our beloved sun king."

"But Mr. Pepys is such a nice man..." Deb sighs.

Nate  •  Link

"Hmmn…Ambassador Colbert is “incognito” but everyone knows he’s here. Sounds about right."

In this case “incognito” means "unofficially" does it not? He's treated as a typical aristocrat but not as Ambassador.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Pepys has often written since the Fire, of going 'round along the City Wall.

Ralph Berry  •  Link

I seem to remember as a boy in the 1950's if we were going to a single destination we were going "up to London" but if we were going to a number of destinations we would be going "round London" I don't know if these terms are still used.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Methinks that, after several days on the road south and back, Elizabeth and the rest of the Pepys entourage are heading for home PDQ. SP himself, after an appointed appearance, registers relief to be back and find all well at the end.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Up, and I walked out, and met Uncle Wight, whom I sent to last night, and Mr. Wight coming to see us, and I walked with them back to see my aunt at Katherine Hill"

L&M: Uncle Wight (half-brother of Pepys's father) had a house at St Catherine's Hill, nr. Guildford. .Mr. Wight' was possibly his son William.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I hear that Colbert, the French Ambassador, is come, and hath been at Court incognito. When he hath his audience, I know not."

Charles Colbert, Marquis de Croissy, was ambassador-extraordinary, later ambassador-in-ordinaryuntil 1674. He had now taken up residence at Leicestter House. His official audience did not take place until 19 August: SCO Venice 1666-68. The incognito visit (the first of two) excited the suspicion that France was anxious to break up the understanding between England and Holland and could not wait for the formalities of of public entry and formal audience to be completed before démarche: ib., pp. 250, 251, 252-3. For his public entry see http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/08/17/ and
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/08/17/#c3450… and
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/08/17/?c=540…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

'Charles II: August 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 516-565. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

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Aug. 8. 1668
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners.

The water casks and cooper’s stores, being all that was wanting to complete the Yarmouth, were shipped in the Hopewell hoy 31 July.

All to complete the Montague and Tiger’s victualling went 5 August.
[S P Dom., Car. II. 244, No. 123.]

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Aug. 8. 1668
Victualling Office.
Sir Denis Gauden to the Navy Commissioners.

Most part of the victuals for the men weighing the wrecks were sent to Chatham on Wednesday;
there was no old beef; all was slaughtered this month.
[S P Dom., Car. II. 244, No. 124.]

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Aug. 8. 1668
Deal.
B. St. Michel, muster master, to Sam. Pepys.

Particulars of my journey to the Downs;
I hope to return the musters of ships named, to the Navy office by the next.
My love to my dear sister,
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 244, No. 125.]

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Aug. 8. 1668
Bristol.
Capt. John Wettwang to the Navy Commissioners.

There is a great necessity for entering men on board the Edgar,
as those hired at weekly wages will not lie on board at night,
and are a greater charge than those borne upon the ship.

There being no safe moorings here, it requires much care to keep her in the dock.

Fifty men are wanted, and volunteers to keep those that are pressed;
asks an order for that number of men to be entered.
[S P Dom., Car. II. 244, No. 126.]

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Aug. 8. 1668
M. Wren to the Navy Commissioners.

Capt. Rooth stays for nothing but your credit at Cadiz;
I beseech you to take speedy order in it, as the time passes away.
[S P Dom., Car. II. 244, No. 127.]

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Aug. 8. 1668
Whitehall.
Reference of the petition of Lady Jermyn, and 4 others,
the creditors of Thos. Killigrew — for payment of their debt out of his pension, according to his assignment — to the Treasury Commissioners, to some of whom the King has already declared his will to have those arrears paid.
[S.P. Dom., Entry Book 18, p. 328.]

Cliff  •  Link

There's something a bit odd here. One moment he's in Guildford socialising and next he's home in Seething and then he's off on business by water.

As a Londoner myself my thought is that even with today's transport systems that would be pushing it a bit, in Samuel's time I don't think it would work.

Or, have I lost the plot - again?

Puzzling.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Pepys had lunch in Guildford, and was at Vauxhall (south of the Thames) in the late afternoon. It's about 30 miles as the crow flies, say 45 by road via Epsom, and so long as you don't get lost around Cobham, that's do-able in five hours. It's August, so it's still daylight, and he doesn't mention rain.

But I agree, Cliff; they didn't stop for sightseeing or cheesecake along the way, and they had four good horses.

Mary K  •  Link

Must have been a very early dinner by Pepys normal standards.

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