Wednesday 3 June 1668

Up, and to the office, where busy till 9 o’clock, and then to White Hall, to the Council-chamber, where I did present the Duke of York with an account of the charge of the present fleete, to his satisfaction; and this being done, did ask his leave for my going out of town five or six days, which he did give me, saying, that my diligence in the King’s business was such, that I ought not to be denied when my own business called me any whither. Thence with Sir D. Gawden to Westminster, where I did take a turn or two, and met Roger Pepys, who is mighty earnest for me to stay from going into the country till he goes, and to bring my people thither for some time: but I cannot, but will find another time this summer for it. Thence with him home, and there to the office till noon, and then with Lord Brouncker, Sir J. Minnes, and Sir G. Carteret, upon whose accounts they have been this day to the Three Tuns to dinner, and thence back again home, and after doing a little business I by coach to the King’s house, and there saw good, part of “The Scornfull Lady,” and that done, would have taken out Knepp, but she was engaged, and so to my Lord Crew’s to visit him; from whom I learn nothing but that there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich’s signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it. Thence by coach to Westminster to the Hall, and thence to the Park, where much good company, and many fine ladies; and in so handsome a hackney I was, that I believe Sir W. Coventry and others, who looked on me, did take me to be in one of my own, which I was a little troubled for. So to the lodge, and drank a cup of new milk, and so home, and there to Mrs. Turner’s, and sat and talked with her, and then home to bed, having laid my business with W. Hewer to go out of town Friday next, with hopes of a great deal of pleasure.


12 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"...I ought not to be denied when my own business called me any whither."

"any whither" - haven't encoutered that nice (obsolete) phrase before.

Chris Squire  •  Link

‘anywhither, adv. Indefinite compound of whither. To or towards any place, in any direction whatever.
1611 Bible (A.V.) 1 Kings ii. 36 Goe not forth thence any whither [ Wyclif & Coverdale hidir and thider.]
1658 O. Cromwell Speech 20 Jan. in Writings & Speeches (1947) IV. 705 To fly for Holland, New-England, almost any-whither, to find Liberty for their Consciences.
1722 D. Defoe Jrnl. Plague Year 69 There was no easie passing the Roads any whither . . ’ [OED]

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Jamie...Nice boss, miserably rigid autocrat. Another of those European monarchs who'd probably have done quite well as a powerless figurehead in a constitutional monarchy but was unfortunate enough to have been born in the wrong era.

cgs  •  Link

James was tarred with unpopular fluvius tiberinus

Jenny Long  •  Link

I'm very pleased to be joining my fellow "Pepysians". I've joined late and would like to annotate older entries. Is that allowed"

Mary  •  Link

Certainly. The practice is for all recently posted annotations, whether referring to the current page of the diary or to older entries, are flagged under the "Recent Activity" tag.

Jenny  •  Link

Thank you Mary.

Tony Eldridge  •  Link

"and in so handsome a hackney I was, that I believe Sir W. Coventry and others, who looked on me, did take me to be in one of my own, which I was a little troubled for."

First rule of embezzlement: Don't arrive at the office in an expensive sports car.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"...there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich’s signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it. "

L&M relate the Privy Council had decided in an inquiry of 29-30 May that Sandwich should not have added his signature at the bottom of the treaty, but the signatures of Charles II and Sandwich should have come first.

[ Methinks the signatures of the plenipotentiaries of the parties to the treaty should be first, as it was. ]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

'Charles II: June 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 418-468. British History Online
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

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June 3. 1668
The Monmouth, Downs. Sir Thos. Allin to Williamson.
I have gone aboard again, and want news.
If Sir Richard Browne desires an account of what passed between me and Van Swaers, show him part of a letter enclosed.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 26.]
Enclosing,
Sir Thos. Allin to Lord Arlington.

I met Capt. De la Roche on 25 Feb. near Spithead, and invited him and the other captains to dinner.

I received orders the next day from the Duke of York to reclaim the St. Mary prize, taken by De la Roche from Torbay, and some English ships taken by him.
I sent to in form De la Roche of these orders, on which he delivered them without demur, and then set sail.

As to Van Swaers, I fell in with his squadron on 5 April near the Lizard;
he did not strike his flag, and I therefore ordered it to be shot at, when it was struck but not furled.

I sent for the captain, who sent his lieutenant on board;
the flag was again hoisted, but this was by mistake;
the lieutenant, on his return to the ship, had it lowered, and we parted amicably.
—3 June, The Monmouth, Downs.
[2 ½ pages: S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 26i.]

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June 3. 1668
Tower of London
Sir J. Robinson to Williamson,

I informed you at the Council chamber of the mistake made in the returns of the retrenchments of the charge of the Tower, as to dieting and keeping prisoners.
Two words taken out of the warrant will do my business, and will be what I condescended to in the Council chamber, but made no agreement.

I send Mr. Ward with the order, and intreat your aid to get the business rectified, so as to be preserved from the clamour of prisoners.

I hope to hear from you when in the country.
I have left my address with Rob. Yard, your servant.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 30.]

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June 3. 1668
London.
Sir Denis Gauden to Sam. Pepys.

I find the French Ruby, which has a good part of her victuals and beer, left out of my paper.
Am I to stop sending any more, and dispose of that to other ships, or to put the remainder on board?

Can anything be done in my concerns this afternoon?
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 33.]

"Thence with Sir D. Gawden to Westminster, where I did take a turn or two," -- evidently Sir Dennis was trying to get your attention, Pepys. I suspect he needs money.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

June 3. 1668
Woolwich.
Wm. Acworth and 3 other officers of Woolwich to the Navy Commissioners.

Have viewed the 11 bundles of hemp weighed from Aldermen [Edw.] Bilton and [Fras.]. Asty and [Wm.] Harrington, which was wetted in a lighter, and weighed when dry 7 tons 13 cwt. 17 lb.;
they judge that 3 tons of it wetted by the rain are 15/. worse to the service.

It is dried and cured, and if ordered into the stores, would be wrought out first, but only into unimportant sorts of cordage.

Had not the master of the Expedition sent for a lighter full, and then refused to take in half, the merchants might have kept it safe in their warehouse for the next vessel.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 241, No. 35.]

What does wet hemp smell like? And is it inferior product after drying? Good rope is so essential.

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