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About Wednesday 4 April 1660

jeannine  •  Link

Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
“5th. Thursday. We sailed out of the Hope and came back to an anchor between the buoy of the Nore and Blacktail. “

About Monday 2 April 1660

jeannine  •  Link

Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
“April 2nd. Monday. I went out of the Swiftsure into the Naseby to remain there. “

About Tuesday 27 March 1660

jeannine  •  Link

Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
“27th. Tuesday. We fell down into the Hope.”

Interesting contrast to Sam's diary entry of the day.

About Monday 26 March 1660

jeannine  •  Link

Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
“26th. Monday. We fell down over against Northfleete.”

About Friday 23 March 1659/60

jeannine  •  Link

Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
"Friday March 23. On Friday, March 23 1659, I took barge at the Tower Wharf and about noon boarded the Swiftsure, then riding in the Long Reach in the river of the Thames, off Greenhithe. About 2 oclock Vice Admiral Lawson and divers other commanders out of Tilbury Hope came on board me."

About Thursday 22 March 1659/60

jeannine  •  Link

Sandwich’s Journals

From the comment above re: the journals of Lord Sandwich, and with some spoilers.
Journal of the Earl of Sandwich; Navy Records Society, edited by R.C. Anderson
Introduction: “From September 1659 to March 1659/60 Mountagu (Sandwich) was ashore, for the most part in retirement at Hinchingbrooke. Of the troubles and intrigues of the autumn and winter his Journal says nothing; in fact, even for the final scenes of the Restoration it adds little to what was already known. Mountagu’s place in command of the fleet had been taken by Lawson and Vice-Admiral and the new commander, by bringing the fleet up the Thames at a critical moment and by declaring firmly for the return of Parliament, had a great share in the series of events that which made the Restoration inevitable. “

About Monday 31 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

The was a man named Samuel Pepys
A Diary Samuel did keep
He recorded his life
I’ll miss him and his wife
But all of you my dear friends, I will keep……

Many thanks to the world’s most wonderful host, Phil Gyford, all of the annotators and lurkers who’ve shared the adventure. It’s been a wonderful community to share each day.

About Sunday 30 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

Sam's final entry is coming with tomorrow's entry -May has 31 days, so we have one left to enjoy!

About Sunday 30 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

"and so to bed"...we have one more day to enjoy before he pulls up the covers for good.. we'll cherish while we can..

About Wednesday 26 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

From Davidson’s “Catherine of Braganza” p. 241-2

“For the fourth time, in the early spring…..Catherine was raised to the seventh heaven of hope, only to descend to the abyss of regret and disappointment. On May 19th, she was dining in her own apartments at Whitehall, in her white pinner and apron, with the King, and Pepys, who had come to see Charles on business, and was admitted to the Queen’s lodging, thought that she seemed handsomer so than in her smart attire.. On the 26th of the month, Catherine was taken suddenly ill, and Madame Nun, Chiffinch’s sister, and another of her women, had to be sent for in haste, from dinner with Pepys, which confirmed the world in its hopes of the Queen’s condition. This Chiffinch, or “Chivens’ as Pepys calls him, was one of the King’s confidential servants.

On June 1 Arlington wrote to Temple that the Queen was very well, and that everyone was rejoicing in the hopes that they dared to believe well founded. But on June 7 Charles had to write to Madame [his sister in Paris], to whom he had a month before confided his expectations.
“My wife after all hopes has miscarried, again, without visible incident. The physicians are divided whether it were false conception, or a good one”.

The physicians present were Dr. Cox and Dr. Williams, but they were instructed by Buckingham, at least so Burnet says, to deny that there had ever been any miscarriage, and to spread a report abroad that it was an impossibility for the Queen ever to have children.

It is odd, after Charles’s declaration that there had been no visible incident, to read in Clayton’s letter to Sir Robert Paston that Catherine’s illness was produced by fright, caused by an ‘unfortunate accident with one of the King’s tame foxes, which, stealing after the King unknown into the bedchamber, lay there all night and in the morning, very early, leaped upon the bed, and run over the Queen’s face and into the bed.” This was quite enough to account for anything, and Catherine suffered from Charles’s inconvenient attachment to his pets, which he carried on to an excess. His King Charles spaniels not only followed him on all his walks, but brought up their families in his rooms, and even his bed. The consequence, on this occasion, of his passion for pets was somewhat fatal.

Buckingham and Lauderdale seized at once on the miscarriage to raise the divorce question once more….”

About Tuesday 25 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

Terry, he's probably stretching it out because he doesn't have the 'cut and paste' option-so when it's hand written a few extra words may slip in there.

About Tuesday 18 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

“she being much troubled with the tooth-ake, and I staid till a surgeon of hers come, one Leeson, who hath formerly drawn her mouth, and he advised her to draw…”
having just seen the play “Little Shop of Horrors” I could not help but thinking of their ‘Dentist” song—a great career for a sadist. Poor Elizabeth!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOtMizMQ6oM

About Roll Call. Say hello!

jeannine  •  Link

Greetings from the US!
I enjoy biographies and the Restoration period. While doing a web search on Queen Catherine of Braganza, I stumbled across the Diary in June 1662 (2004). I left an annotation about her in one of the daily entries. Phil contacted me and asked me to put my entry into the encyclopedia, which he was building at the time, and I happily obliged. From there I heard from a fellow annotator, Pedro, who was also reading about Queen Catherine. A conversation ensued and he roped me into the Diary. When Phil was looking for recruits to write some of the encyclopedia summary pages, I ‘adopted’ Catherine of Braganza, Lord Sandwich, Sir George Carteret, Barbara Palmer, Frances Stuart, Lord Clarendon, Charles Berkeley and Prince Rupert, among them. I’ve had fun writing more than a dozen In-Depth Articles and the monthly Story so Far summaries (which I picked up from Dirk in 1663).
What I enjoy most is the wonderful community that Phil has created. This has been an incredibly warm and welcoming group of people to share ideas with and to ‘virtually’ befriend. I’ve been lucky to expand many friendships beyond the Diary and have enjoyed communicating with annotators/readers around the globe. I’ve also had the pleasure to meet some of my fellow Pepys Pals face to face, which has been a true delight. I am so grateful to Phil for his perseverance, creativity and generosity with his time and talents. To all of my fellow Pepysians-those annotators and those readers, you’ve been a great group to share my morning tea with~~ will miss you all!

About Tuesday 11 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

The Queen's miscarriage (spoiler)... it doesn't happen today, but will follow and be recorded by Pepys before the Diary ends.

About Monday 10 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

but what will be the date of the last diary entry?

Sam's last Diary entry is May 31, so the end of the month marks his fond farewell, and depending on your time zone, it may be the 31st of May or June 1, when you catch the last entry. Whatever will we do...........

About Monday 10 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

From Oxford Dictionary of English Folklore:

http://www.answers.com/topic/may-dew

There is a widespread belief, in Britain and abroad, that dew gathered on May Day morning is particularly good for the complexion, and countless people have acted on this knowledge over the last 500 years. Samuel Pepys's wife Elizabeth clearly believed that any time in May would do, as he records her going out on 28 May 1667, and 10 May 1669. In some areas there were extra stipulations: dew gathered under oak trees or off hawthorn bushes being specially good. May dew was also believed to be particularly effective for certain complaints, first mentioned in 1602 for sore eyes and in Launceston, ‘poor people say that a swelling in the neck may be cured by the patient, if a woman, going before sunrise on the first of May, to the grave of the young man last buried in the churchyard, collecting there from the dew by passing the hand three times from the head to the foot of the grave, and applying the dew to the part affected. If the patient be a man, the grave chosen must be that of the last young woman buried in the churchyard’ (N&Q 1s:2 (1850), 474-5). Other ailments such as consumption and weak joints and muscles could also be treated with May dew, or even with May rain.

About Monday 10 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

3 am May Dew wake up call....so Elizabeth goes out with a maid in the dark to get May Dew. I am curious if Sam's 'fear of any hurt' relates more to a fear that someone will physically get hurt #i.e. a fall in the dark,etc.# or perhaps hurt by someone else #assault, etc#. I wonder about the safety that time of the night. Still, he doesn't seem to put any stop to it, or offer to go along for protection, and rather just goes back to hit the sack.

About Sunday 9 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

At the start of the diary (1660-1661) Sam thought Mills delivered good sermons and even considered him to be in top form at times

Bryan, think of it as a growing taste in the finer things of life. In college one may have thought a cheap wine was great, but as they grow and can afford to experience diverse and better tastes, what once was appealing loses its luster. Sam has ‘shopped around’ for sermons over the years and also has a larger base for comparison. He is becoming a connoisseur of fine sermons, an Mr Mills doesn't seem up to top ratings anymore.

About Sunday 9 May 1669

jeannine  •  Link

St Olaves=Dr Mills= ‘dull’
St Andrews=Dr Stillingfleete=’sold out’
St Margaret’s= long distance sighting of Betty Mitchell =forgot to mention sermon, remembered to mention Betty was losing her youthful looks…
Some things never change……