Annotations and comments

Bill has posted 2,770 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

14 Jan 2017, 9:06 a.m. - Bill

"Link-rot" - Many of links by former annotators, not unexpectedly, are no longer available. Sometimes updated links are available, sometimes not. The Wayback Machine, which archives the web, can be useful for sites no longer current. The second URL below describes an extension to the Chrome browser that will do this search automatically. https://archive.org/web/ http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-chrome-gets-wayback-machine-extension-end-to-the-pain-of-404-errors/

11 Jan 2017, 11:46 p.m. - Bill

VINER, Sir THOMAS, baronet (1588-1665), lord mayor of London; came to London, 1600; brought up by Samuel Moore, goldsmith; alderman of London, 16461660, sheriff, 1648, lord mayor, 1653; knighted, 1654; created baronet, 1661; did much government banking business from James I's to Charles II's time; benefactor of the Goldsmiths' Company. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

11 Jan 2017, 11:39 p.m. - Bill

“did accost her alone, and spoke of his hoping she was with child” To ACCOST, to approach, to draw near to, to make, come up to, or set upon a Person. ---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

6 Jan 2017, 6 p.m. - Bill

Terry says above: "the universal character" Pepys refers to may not mean what you might think. He may indeed have been referring to John Wilkin's ideas (mentioned by SP in 1666 and published in 1668). But he may also have had this 1657 publication in mind: [Cave] Beck is remembered for his book, "The Universal Character", published in London in 1657; it was also published the same year in French. The books's full title was "The Universal Character, by which all Nations in the World may understand one another's Conceptions, Reading out of one Common Writing their own Mother Tongues. An Invention of General Use, the Practise whereof may be Attained in two Hours' space, Observing the Grammatical Directions. Which Character is so contrived, that it may be Spoken as well as Written". In his book Beck sought to invent a universal language that could be understood and used by anyone in the world, no matter what their mother tongue. It was based on the ten Arabic numerals, 0-9, which he proposed the following pronunciations: 1. Aun, 2. Too, 3. Tray, 4. For orfo, 5. Fai, 6. Sic, 7. Sen, 8. At, 9. Nin, 0. o. The combinations of these characters, intended to express all the main words in any language, were to be arranged in numerical order, from zero to 10,000, which he considered sufficient to cover all words in general use. ---Wikipedia entry for Cave Beck. (1623–c.1706)

6 Jan 2017, 4:44 p.m. - Bill

“It is believed by many circumstances that his man is guilty of confederacy” CONFEDERACY, CONFEDERATION, an Alliance between Princes and States, for their Defence against a Common Enemy; In Law, it is an uniting of Persons to do any unlawful Act. To CONFEDERATE, to unite into a Confederacy, to combine, to plot together. ---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

6 Jan 2017, 4:36 p.m. - Bill

SCOBELL, HENRY (d. 1660), clerk of the parliament: appointed for life, 1648; joint-licenser of newspapers and political pamphlets, 1649; assistant-secretary to council of state, 1653; published works on parliamentary procedure. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

5 Jan 2017, 10:10 p.m. - Bill

Eldest son of Sir Thomas Chamberlayne, Chief Justice of Chester. He was created a baronet in 1642. ---Wheatley, 1904.

5 Jan 2017, 9:36 p.m. - Bill

MAITLAND, JOHN, second Earl and first Duke of Lauderdale (1616-1682), grandson of Sir John Maitland; grand-nephew of William Maitland of Lethington; regarded as a rising hope of the ultra-covenanting party; commissioner for the Solemn League and Covenant, 1643-6; one of the commissioners who obtained the famous 'Engagement'; with Charles II in Holland, 1649; followed him to Worcester and was taken prisoner, 1651; kept a prisoner till 1660; secretary for Scottish affairs, 1660-80; aimed at making the crown absolute in Scotland both in state and church; had complete influence over Charles; created Duke of Lauderdale and Marquis of March in the Scottish peerage, 1672; placed upon the commission for the admiralty, 1673; made a privy councillor and a peer of England as Earl of Guildford and Baron Petersham, 1674: supported by Charles II against attacks from the English parliament. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

5 Jan 2017, 3:41 p.m. - Bill

And also if one of "our" encyclopedia entries also has a link to a Wikipedia entry, I see no need to reproduce any of Wikipedia's information in an annotation. (Especially without attribution.)

31 Dec 2016, 7:55 p.m. - Bill

Here is another amazing video of "Prince Rupert's Drops" by the same people. They demonstrate that even a bullet cannot shatter one of those glass drops. Really. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24q80ReMyq0

31 Dec 2016, 7:32 p.m. - Bill

eileen d., I have taken it upon myself to post entries from the DNB: Index and Epitome (1906) into our in-house encyclopedia. These entries are very short, abbreviated summaries of biographies in the DNB. Since I mentioned him above, here is the longish entry for Prince Rupert: http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1357/#c534222

28 Dec 2016, 7:39 p.m. - Bill

Indeed Chris, your annotation about Sam's ambition reminds me of the entry of 2 March 1661/62: "With my mind much eased talking long in bed with my wife about our frugall life for the time to come, proposing to her what I could and would do if I were worth 2,000l., that is, be a knight, and keep my coach, which pleased her."

28 Dec 2016, 2:03 a.m. - Bill

Anne, daughter of Sir George Whitmore, of Barnes, in Surrey. ---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854. Sir George Whitmore http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/7873/

28 Dec 2016, 1:59 a.m. - Bill

HENCHMAN, HUMPHREY (1592-1675), bishop of London; M.A. Christ's College, Cambridge, 1616; D.D., 1628; fellow of Clare Hall, 1616-23; canon and precentor of Salisbury, 1623, and rector of Isle of Portland; deprived during rebellion; assisted Charles II to escape after Worcester, 1651; bishop of Salisbury, 1660-3; took influential part in Savoy conference, 1661; bishop of London, 1663-75; restored cathedral and palace at Salisbury, and contributed to rebuilding of St. Paul's, Aldersgate palace, and Clare Hall. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

28 Dec 2016, 1:45 a.m. - Bill

“The Duke of Monmouth’s mother’s brother hath a place at Court” Mr. Justice Waters, said to be “of the Temple,” by Thurloe. ---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

28 Dec 2016, 1:36 a.m. - Bill

MACDONNELL, RANDAL, second Viscount Dunluce, second Earl and first Marquis of Antrim (1609-1683), son of Sir Randal MacDonnell, first viscount Dunluce and first earl of Antrim; introduced at court, 1634; married the Duke of Buckingham's widow, 1635; sent by the king to raise forces in Scotland, 1639; took his seat in the Irish House of Lords, 1640; frequently imprisoned as a suspect, 1642-5; ordered to lay down his arms, 1646; retired to Ireland; allowed to return to England, 1650; pardoned, 1663. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

26 Dec 2016, 4:16 p.m. - Bill

COLET, JOHN (1467?-1519), dean of St. Paul's and founder of St. Paul's School; eldest and only surviving child of Sir Henry Colet; studied at Oxford, c. 1483; M.A., c. 1490: read mathematics and, in Latin versions, Platonic and Neo-platonic philosophy; nonresident rector of Dennington, Suffolk, 1485-1519; vicar of St. Dunstan's, Stepney, 1485-1605; rector of Thurning, Huntingdonshire, 1490-3; prebendary of York, 1494, and of St. Martin-le-Grand, 1494-1504; chaplain of Hilberworth, Norfolk; travelled in Italy, studying the fathers, canon and civil law, and the rudiments of Greek, 1493-6; resided in Oxford, and lectured on the New Testament, 1496-1504; priest, 1498; met Erasmus, 1498; prebendary of Salisbury, 1502; D.D., 1504; dean of St. Paul's, 1504-19; inherited his father's vast fortune, 1505; founded St. Paul's School, writing for it in English a Latin accidence, 1509; endowed the school, 1511-14; preached before convocation against ecclesiastical corruptions, 1512; preached against war with France, 1512-13; accused of heresy by FitzJames, bishop of London, 1513-14; made the Canterbury pilgrimage, 1514; paid an annuity to Erasmus; preached at Wolsey's installation as cardinal, 1515; drew up statutes for St. Paul's School, 1518; some of his devotional works published, 1534; his complete works first issued, 1867-76. ---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

26 Dec 2016, 3:07 p.m. - Bill

Anne Marshall, a celebrated actress at the King's House, and her youngest sister Becke, so frequently mentioned in the Diary, seemed to have been the daughters of a Presbyterian minister (Oct. 26,1667); but very little is known about their history. One of them is erroneously stated, in the notes to the Memoires de Grammont, and Davies's Dramatic Miscellanies, to have become Lord Oxford's mistress. ---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

21 Dec 2016, 12:35 p.m. - Bill

Shoreditch, a manor and populous parish, at the north-east end of London, between Norton Folgate, Hoxton, and Hackney. The old way of spelling the name is Soersditch, but the derivation is uncertain. That it was so called after Jane Shore, the mistress of Edward IV., is a vulgar error. The popular notion had early taken material form in the Jane Shore Inn, of which there are 17th-century tokens extant. The inn still exists—No. 103 Shoreditch High Street Soersditch, so called more than four hundred years since, as I can prove by record.—Stow, p. 158. The Manour of Soersditch with the Polehowse and Bowes (so expressed in the Record), lately belonging to John de Northampton of London, Draper, was granted 15 Richard II. to Edmund Duke of York, and Earl of Cambridge, and Edward Earl of Roteland [Rutland], son of the same Edmund and Isabel.—Strype, B. iv. p.50. ---London, Past and Present. H.B. Wheatley, 1891.

19 Dec 2016, 2:06 p.m. - Bill

GALLEY, a Sea-Vessel with Oars. ---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.