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Bill has posted 2,770 annotations/comments since 9 March 2013.

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About Tuesday 19 April 1664

Bill  •  Link

“where I first saw orange-trees”

John Evelyn mentions in his Diary (Sept. 25th, 1679) the excellence of the China oranges grown on his own trees, and later on he writes: "20 September, 1700. I went to Beddington, the ancient seate of the Carews, heretofore adorned with ample gardens and the first orange trees that had been seen in England planted in the open ground." William Bray, the editor, says that oranges were eaten in this kingdom in the time of King James I., if not earlier, as appears by the accounts of a student in the Temple, which he had seen.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Wednesday 13 April 1664

Bill  •  Link

“Then to talk of our business with the Dutch; he tells me fully that he believes it will not come to a warr”

Among the State Papers is a news letter (dated July 14th, 1664) containing information as to the views of the Dutch respecting a war with England. "They are preparing many ships, and raising 6,000 men, and have no doubt of conquering by sea." "A wise man says the States know how to master England by sending moneys into Scotland for them to rebel, and also to the discontented in England, so as to place the King in the same straits as his father was, and bring him to agree with Holland" ("Calendar," 1663-64, p. 642).
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Triennial Parliaments Act 1664

Bill  •  Link

April 5th, 1664. In compliance with the King's expressed wish "the House immediately set about repealing the obnoxious Triennial Bill, which they stigmatized as derogatory to the prerogative of the Crown, and as a short compensation prepared another short one, which provided that parliaments should not be intermitted above three years" (Cobbett's " Parliamentary History," vol. iv., col. 292).
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Monday 28 March 1664

Bill  •  Link

“I walked through the house with him for an hour in St. James’s fields”

St. James's Fields consisted of an open space west of the Haymarket, and north of Pall Mall, now occupied by St. James's Square and the adjacent streets. The square was planned about this time by the Earl of St. Albans.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Henry Coventry

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COVENTRY, HENRY (1619-1686), secretary of state; a younger son of Thomas, first baron Coventry; fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford; B.C.L., 1638; attended Charles II in exile; envoy to Sweden, 1664-6 and 1671, and to Holland, 1667; secretary of state, 1672-9.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Henry Coventry

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Henry, third son of Thomas, first Lord Coventry; after the Restoration made a Groom of the Bedchamber, and elected M.P. for Droitwich. In 1664 he was sent Envoy Extraordinary to Sweden, where he remained two years, and was again employed on an embassy to the same court in 1671. He also succeeded in negotiating the peace at Breda in 1667, and in 1672 became Secretary of State, which office he resigned in 1679, on account of ill health. He died unmarried, December 7th, 1686. —B.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About James Norman

Bill  •  Link

John Vaughan, appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, and knighted, 1668. He died December 10th 1674.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Sunday 13 March 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

WANT, Deficiency, Lack, Need, Poverty.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Sunday 13 March 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“and showed me a bag which I and Wm. Joyce told, coming to 5l.14s. 0d.”

To TELL, to count or number.
To TELL NO STORE, to account as nothing.
TELLERS, [in the Exchequer] four Officers, whose Business it is to receive and pay all the Monies upon the King's Account.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Thursday 3 March 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“I observe him to be very considerate and to mind his book”

To mind (or ply) his book, etudier fort & ferme [Study strong and firm]
---A short dictionary English and French. G. Miège, 1684.

About Wimbledon

Bill  •  Link

The manor-house of Wimbledon was purchased of Sir Christopher Hatton by Sir Thomas Cecil (afterwards Earl of Exeter), who rebuilt it in 1588. He bequeathed it to his third son, Sir Edward Cecil (afterwards Viscount Wimbledon), at whose death in 1638 it was sold to Queen Henrietta Maria. The estate was seized during the Civil Wars, and a survey was taken by order of Parliament in 1649 (printed in "Archaeologia," vol. x.). At the Restoration it again came into the possession of the Queen Dowager, who in 1661 sold it to George Digby, Earl of Bristol. On his death in 1676 it was sold by his widow to Lord Treasurer Danby (afterwards Duke of Leeds). Wimbledon House, designed by John Thorpe, was a very remarkable building, thought by some (according to Fuller) to be equal, if not to exceed Nonsuch. There is a view of the front in Lysons' "Environs of London."
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Monday 14 March 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“and her stomach coming down we were presently friends”

Pride, haughtiness, only used now as a quotation.

"He was a man
Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
Himself with princes."
Shakespeare, Henry VIII., act iv., sc. 2.

---Wheatley, 1904.

STOMACH, ... also Choler or Passion; a testy and refractory Humour.
STOMACHFUL, that has a great Spirit, dogged, peevish, loath to submit.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Royal Fishery

Bill  •  Link

There had been recently established, under the Great Seal of England, a Corporation for the Royal Fishing, of which the Duke of York was Governor, Lord Craven Deputy-Governor, and the Lord Mayor and Chamberlain of London, for the time being, Treasurers, in which body was vested the sole power of licensing lotteries ("The Newes," October 6th, 1664). The original charter (dated April 8th, 1664), incorporating James, Duke of York, and thirty-six assistants as Governor and Company of the Royal Fishing of Great Britain and Ireland, is among the State Papers. The duke was to be Governor till February 26th, 1665.
---Wheatley, 1904.

About Jean d'Espagne

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D'ESPAGNE, JEAN (1591-1659), French protestant pastor and theologian; pastor at Orange, 1620; published 'Antiduello,' a discussion on the morality of the duel, 1632; pastor to a French congregation in London, which came to regard him as a schismatic.
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

About Friday 19 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“ Mr. Jaggard, a salter, in Thames Street,”

SALTER, one who deals in Salt or Salt Fish.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

So not surprising that Jaggard served a dinner of “all fish”.

About Wednesday 17 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“both of whom are very witty men”

WITTY, full of wit.
WIT, One of the Faculties of the rational Soul, Genius, Fancy, aptness for any Thing, Cunningness.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

About Wednesday 17 February 1663/64

Bill  •  Link

“where I found an excellent mastiffe, his name Towser”

To TOUSE. To pull; to tear; to haul; to drag; whence touser.
---A Dictionary Of The English Language. Samuel Johnson, 1756.