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Terry Foreman has posted 16,358 annotations/comments since 28 June 2005.

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About Friday 13 March 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"At noon home to dinner...and...there came in Captain Grove, and I found him to be a very stout man, at least in his discourse he would be thought so, and I do think that he is, and one that bears me great respect and deserves to be encouraged for his care in all business."

L&M: Edward Grove, naval captain, acted as a river agent for the Navy Board -- an efficient onw, but fussy and boastful, to judge by his correspondence. On 21 February last, he had impressed Pepys by his willingness to defend the Board against the Exchequer's bailiffs. In 1665 he was guilty of cowardice during te Battle if Lowestoft, when Pepys write him off as a 'prating coxcomb...of no courage': https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/06/16/ In 1664 Pepys had considered him as a possible husband for his sister Paulina: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/02/09/

About Thursday 12 March 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I to the office, where at the choice of maisters and chyrurgeons for the fleet now going out,"

L&M: This squadron sailed to Portugal and the Mediterranean in early May, more than a month later than expected: PRO, Adm. 106/7, no. 199; HMC, Heathcote, pp. 65-6, 80; CSPD 1663-4, p. 130.

About George Jolliffe

Terry Foreman  •  Link

George Joliffe

He had had attended Pepys after his operation for the stone in 1658 and had died shortly afterwards at an early age. (L&M fn. 2/27/1663)

About Monday 23 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"But it being my birthday and my day of liberty regained to me, and lastly, the last play that is likely to be acted at Court before Easter, because of the Lent coming in, I was the easier content to fling away so much money."

L&M: I.e. on the visit to the LIF. It was not until 1675 that the King allowed a company to charge fir admission to a court performance at Whitehall --- much to Evelyn's disgust (29 September): E. Boswell, Restoration Court Stage, p. 121.

About Monday 23 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

" The play being done, we took coach and to Court, and there got good places, and saw “The Wilde Gallant,” "

L&M: Dryden's first comedy; published in 1669. The play was now performed by the King's Company in the Great Hall, Whitehall, which stood between the Banqueting House and the Thames. In December 1662 stepping for seats and a stage 27 ft. wide were constructed there: E. Boswell, Restoration Court Stage, pp. 25-6.

About Monday 23 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"While my wife dressed herself, Creed and I walked out to see what play was acted to-day, and we find it “The Slighted Mayde.”"

L&M: Playbills were fixed to posts in various parts of London. .This play was a comedy by Sir Robert Stapylton, published in 1663/ This is the first recorded performance. The cast listed by Genest (i. 46) includes Betterton as Iberio, Harris as Salerno, Sandford as Vindex and Mrs Betterton as Pyramena.

About Monday 16 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Coming home I brought Mr. Pickering as far as the Temple, who tells me the story is very true of a child being dropped at the ball at Court; and that the King had it in his closett a week after, and did dissect it; and making great sport of it, said that in his opinion it must have been a month and three hours old; and that, whatever others think, he hath the greatest loss (it being a boy, as he says), that hath lost a subject by the business."

L&M: The ball was possibly that described at 31 December 1662: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/12/31/
For two similar births, see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/06/22/ and
https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/06/22/#c322…
For the King's laboratory 'under his closet', see https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1669/01/15/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1669/01/15/#c540…

About Tuesday 17 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"My Lord told me he expected a challenge from him, but told me there was no great fear of him, for there was no man lies under such an imputation as he do in the business of Mr. Cholmely,"

L&M: The duel mentioned at 6 August 1662.

About Sunday 8 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Another story was how my Lady Castlemaine, a few days since, had Mrs. Stuart to an entertainment, and at night began a frolique that they two must be married, and married they were, with ring and all other ceremonies of church service, and ribbands and a sack posset in bed, and flinging the stocking; but in the close, it is said that my Lady Castlemaine, who was the bridegroom, rose, and the King came and took her place with pretty Mrs. Stuart."

L&M: Frances Stuart (aged about 19) had been appointed Maid of Honour to the Queen at about this time. The King was for long infatuated with her, but she seems to have resisted his advances. Lady Castlemaine was for a while her intimate friend and is said to have encouraged the King's interest in her in order to distract his attention from her intrigue with Jermyn: Grammont, pp. 110-11. Grammont tells of Frances Stuart's 'taste for infantile diversion' (p. 137), such as the one Pepys here describes. She eloped with the Duke of Richmond in 1667.

About Wednesday 4 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"back again to Paul’s School, and went up to see the head forms posed in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew,"

L&M: For the teaching of Hebrew in schools, see Foster Watson, Engl. grammar schools to 1660, ch. xxxii, esp. p. 529; W. A. L. Vincent, The state and school education, 1640-60, pp. 17-19. It had been taught at St Paul's in Pepys's time by John Langley. Pepys never uses it in the 'secret' passages of the diary, but he retained several Hebrew books in his library. The Posing Chamber, where this examination took place, was in yje High Master's house.

About Wednesday 4 February 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I heard some of their speeches, and they were just as schoolboys’ used to be, of the seven liberal sciences"

L&M: The trivium (grammar, logic, rhetoric) and the quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, music and astronomy -- including geography); the traditional curriculum of medieval and early mpdern grammar schools and universities.

About Saturday 31 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

". I home to dinner, and there found my plate of the Soverayne with the table to it "

L&M: There were several drawings of the Royal Sovereign, the largest ship in the navy. The best-known was that by John Payne: The true portraiture of his Majesties' royal ship the Sovereign of the Seas built in the year 1637; Capt. Phineas Pett being superuisor and Peter Pett his sonne, mr builder (1637); see Sir G. Callendar, Po0rtrait of Peter Pett, pl. iv. Pepys now hung the print in his Green Chamber: https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/02/15/ He preserved a copy of Payne's drawing in his library (PL 2972, pp. 271-2). No 'table' (key) has been preserved there or elsewhere. Presumably it was a MS.

About Monday 26 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"He tells me how the King do carry himself nobly to the relations of the dead Cardinall,1 and will not suffer one pasquill to come forth against him; and that he acts by what directions he received from him before his death."

L&M: Cardinal Mazarin had died on 27 February/ 9 March 1661. He left no testament politique, but in his last few weeks gave advice to Louis XIV, which the young King dictated to a secretary, and which is printed in Lettres, instructions et mémoires de Colbert (ed. P. Clément), i. 535. See also A. Chéruel, Hist. de France sous Mazarin, iii. 395+. Many pasquils (i.e. lampoons later known as mazarinades) had been issued against him during his lifetime. See https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/12/11/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/12/11/#c835…

About Col. Henry Honywood

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Henry Honywood of West Hawkes, Kingsworth, Kent; brother of Peter Honywood who lodged at Tom Pepys's house in Salisbury Court. [L&M footnote, 1/25/1663]

About Sunday 25 January 1662/63

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Among others, he wonders what the project should be of the Duke’s going down to Portsmouth just now with his Lady, at this time of the year: it being no way, we think, to increase his popularity, which is not great; nor yet safe to do it, for that reason, if it would have any such effect."
"
L&M: The Duke of York (feared by many as a militarist) was Governor at Portsmouth, 1661-73 (Sir Charles Berkeley, jun., being his deputy). It is possible that this projected visit was connected with the repairs then being made to the fort: CSPD 1663-4, p. 30. Whether he went is uncertain: he was at Whitehall on 26 January and 2 February. For his unpopularity at this time see e.g., CSPD 1660-1, p. 471; cf. https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/05/06/ and https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/05/06/?c=55…

About Monday 6 May 1661

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I hear to-night that the Duke of York’s son is this day dead, which I believe will please every body;

L&M: The baby Charles Stuart, designated Duke of Cambridge, born on 22 October 1660, the first of eight children of the marriage, was buried this day in Westminster Abbey. Both the Duke of York and his secret marriage were unpopular. Cf. https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/02/18/