Thursday 1 April 1669

Up, and with Colonel Middleton, at the desire of Rear-Admiral Kempthorne, the President, for our assisting them, to the Court-martiall on board a yacht in the River here, to try the business of the Purser’s complaints, Baker against Trevanion, his Commander, of “The Dartmouth.” But, Lord! to see what wretched doings there were among all the Commanders to ruin the Purser, and defend the Captain in all his rogueries, be it to the prejudice of the King or Purser, no good man could bear! I confess I was pretty high, which did not at least the young gentlemen Commander like; and Middleton did the like. But could not bring it to any issue this day, sitting till two o’clock; and therefore we being sent for, went to Sir W. Pen’s by invitation to dine; where my wife was, and my Lord Brouncker and his mistress, and Sir J. Minnes and his niece; and here a bad dinner, and little mirth, I being little pleased with my host. However, I made myself sociable; and so, after dinner, my wife and I, with my Lord Brouncker and his mistress, they set us down at my cozen Turner’s, and there we staid awhile and talked; and particularly here we met with Dr. Ball, the Parson of the Temple, who did tell me a great many pretty stories about the manner of the Parsons being paid for their preaching at Paul’s heretofore, and now, and the ground of the Lecture, and heretofore the names of the founders thereof, which were many, at some 5s., some 6s. per annum towards it: and had their names read in the pulpit every sermon among those holy persons that the Church do order a collect for, giving God thanks for. By and by comes by my desire Commissioner Middleton’s coach and horses for us, and we went with it towards the Park, thinking to have met The. Turner and Betty, but did not; so turned back again to their lodging, and there found them and Mr. Batelier, and there, after a little talk, we took leave, and carry Batelier home with us. So to supper, and so to bed.

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — History of the RS, Thomas Birch,

Apr. 1. 1669. -- There was tried an experiment, proposed by Dr. Goddard, to find,, whether muscles in their contraction grew bigger upon the whole, or not? The experiment was by inserting a man's arm into an artificial arm made of tin, having a glass-pipe fitted and erected in the hand of it, so as being filled with water, and the hand of the fleshy arm clutched, the water in the pipe subsided ; but being relaxed and opened, the water rose: which seemed to shew, that in contraction the muscles, upon the whole* were brought into less dimensions than in their dilatation.

Dr. Goddard was desired to bring in a full account of this experiment in writing; which he promised to do, having first repeated it

History of the Royal Society, Thomas Birch, Vol. 2, p. 356.http://goo.gl/DGq9J

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"what wretched doings there were among all the Commanders to ruin the Purser, and defend the Captain in all his rogueries"

L&M note "The captain was charged with assault; he counter-charged the purser with fraud. 'It appears by the captain's confession that he canned the said purser with a little Japan, which he usually carries, but not in the manner the purser pretends nor was it without intolerable pr5ovocation....He had used reproachful and provoking language, saying his caaptain durst not strike him, for, if he shouldm he would give him three blows for one....' CSPD Add. 1660-85, pp. 288. 290."

Hamish Mack   Link to this

Can anyone tell what this means?
"I confess I was pretty high, which did not at least the young gentlemen Commander like"

Mary   Link to this

HM

This, being interpreted, means:

"I confess that I spoke out strongly [was pretty high] which did not please the young gentlemen commanders at least. "

"Like" could be used as an impersonal verb at this time, meaning to please [someone]. In this case "which" would be the subject of the verb. cf sentences such as "It likes me not" which means "It doesn't please me."

The L&M text amends "commander" to "commanders".

That text also punctuates and edits the passage as follows:

"I confess I was pretty high which [they] did not, at least the young gentlemen-commanders, like."

This adds a subject for the verb [they] and changes it from impersonal use to a more familiar transitive form.

rob van hugte   Link to this

"and here a bad dinner, and little mirth, I being little pleased with my host"

Again stuffiung his face at the Penns even though he is not pleased with the company, where is this animosity coming from?

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

Phil, there is something corrupted in the last 15 words of the March 31 entry. Also I could not post a comment there, so have copied it below.

Meanwhile Elizabeth thickens the plot with Mr. Sheres. On March 19 Sam leaves the two of them at his house while the tends to other business. And today Sam relates that Elizabeth now talks of Sheres "with mighty kindness," he having "shewn himself to be a poet." The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography entry on Henry Sheres observes that on his return from aiding Lord Sandwich in Madrid "he became intimate with Pepys, who took a strong liking for him, but his attachment cooled owing to the advances which Sheeres, who was something of a poet, made to Pepys’s wife." From the invaluable Terry Foreman: http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/11574/#d...

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Thanks Andrew - a tiny typo on my part broke the end of that entry. It's fixed now.

languagehat   Link to this

"That text also punctuates and edits the passage as follows:
'I confess I was pretty high which [they] did not, at least the young gentlemen-commanders, like.'"

Man, that's terrible editing and makes me think less of them. You don't rewrite the text to make it more intelligible to modern readers, for Pete's sake.

Mary   Link to this

"that's terrible editing..."

I fully agree and can't immediately think of any similar example in their edition that has wrenched the text around in this way.

Georgiana Wickham   Link to this

"the names of the founders thereof, which were many, at some 5s., some 6s. per annum towards it: and had their names read in the pulpit every sermon among those holy persons that the Church do order a collect for, giving God thanks for."

I get the sense that Pepys thought immortality was obtained too cheaply?

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