Wednesday 16 September 1668

Up; and dressing myself I did begin para toker the breasts of my maid Jane, which elle did give way to more than usual heretofore, so I have a design to try more when I can bring it to. So to the office, and thence to St. James’s to the Duke of York, walking it to the Temple, and in my way observe that the Stockes are now pulled quite down; and it will make the coming into Cornhill and Lumber Street mighty noble. I stopped, too, at Paul’s, and there did go into St. Fayth’s Church, and also in the body of the west part of the Church; and do see a hideous sight of the walls of the Church ready to fall, that I was in fear as long as I was in it: and here I saw the great vaults underneath the body of the Church. No hurt, I hear, is done yet, since their going to pull down the Church and steeple; but one man, on Monday this week, fell from the top to a piece of the roof, of the east end, that stands next the steeple, and there broke himself all to pieces. It is pretty here to see how the late Church was but a case wrought over the old Church; for you may see the very old pillars standing whole within the wall of this. When I come to St. James’s, I find the Duke of York gone with the King to see the muster of the Guards in Hyde Park; and their Colonel, the Duke of Monmouth, to take his command this day of the King’s Life-Guard, by surrender of my Lord Gerard. So I took a hackney-coach and saw it all: and indeed it was mighty noble, and their firing mighty fine, and the Duke of Monmouth in mighty rich clothes; but the well-ordering of the men I understand not. Here, among a thousand coaches that were there, I saw and spoke to Mrs. Pierce: and by and by Mr. Wren hunts me out, and gives me my Lord Anglesey’s answer to the Duke of York’s letter, where, I perceive, he do do what he can to hurt me, by bidding the Duke of York call for my books: but this will do me all the right in the world, and yet I am troubled at it. So away out of the Park, and home; and there Mr. Gibson and I to dinner: and all the afternoon with him, writing over anew, and a little altering, my answer to the Duke of York, which I have not yet delivered, and so have the opportunity of doing it after seeing all their answers, though this do give me occasion to alter very little. This done, he to write it over, and I to the Office, where late, and then home; and he had finished it; and then he to read to me the life of Archbishop Laud, wrote by Dr. Heylin; which is a shrewd book, but that which I believe will do the Bishops in general no great good, but hurt, it pleads for so much Popish. So after supper to bed. This day my father’s letters tell me of the death of poor Fancy, in the country, big with puppies, which troubles me, as being one of my oldest acquaintances and servants. Also good Stankes is dead.

15 Annotations

LKvM   Link to this

So now we know where Fancy had disappeared to when Flora, the "new comer" spaniel bitch that Sam "could not be fond of," arrived at Seething Lane (31 Aug 1668). Rusticated to Brampton and full of puppies, Fancy probably died a wretched parturition-related death like that suffered by so many of her human counterparts.

Australian Susan   Link to this

1 in 3 women died in childbirth - even up until the first decades of the 19th century.

Fancy was a little spaniel - she may have been pregnant by a large farm dog. Presupposing that she went into the country with Bess, but did not return. Poor little dog. Sam's affection for the dog shows again, I think, how fond Sam would have been of children if he had had any.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"among a thousand coaches that were there"
Must have been quite a sight!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Fancy in London August 1664

"At night is brought home our poor Fancy, which to my great grief continues lame still, so that I wish she had not been brought ever home again, for it troubles me to see her." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/08/12/

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Duke of Monmouth"
Monmouth County in New Jersey is probably named after him:"other suggestions include that it was named after James Scott,1st Duke of Monmouth(1649-1685)who had many allies among the east Jersey leadership"
cf wikipedia.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the Stockes are now pulled quite down; and it will make the coming into Cornhill and Lumber Street mighty noble"

L&M note the market building was rebuilt farther back from the crossroads.

***

"the late Church was but a case wrought over the old Church; for you may see the very old pillars standing whole within the wall of this."

L&M note there were two earlier, smaller churches (of the 7th and 10th centuries) on the site of Old St. Paul's [ just burned ].

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I wonder how much "no" Jane had had to apply previously. At least it suggests Sam doesn't force beyond a certain point, willing as he is to take any advantage...Poverty, subordinate husband, widowhood, etc.

JWB   Link to this

Monmouth County

I've an ancestor who arrived in Monmouth Co. before it was named Monmouth Co. He was. & neighbors were, Baptists. Doubtful they'd take on the name of Charles II's bastard or settle near those that would.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"No hurt, I hear, is done yet, since their going to pull down the Church and steeple; but one man, on Monday this week, fell from the top to a piece of the roof, of the east end, that stands next the steeple, and there broke himself all to pieces. "

Glad to hear the man who "fell from the top to a piece of the roof...and there broke himself all to pieces" suffered "no hurt," or is there another meaning here?'
Odd conjunction, whatever, methinks!

Mary   Link to this

"no hurt ...... but one man"

but one man = except that one man

Glyn   Link to this

And even three hundred years later, Mrs Stankes is overlooked in preference to a dog.

Glyn   Link to this

I keep forgetting that Pepys and his contemporaries are currently living in a large building site. Not only are the official buildings such as churches being rebuilt but all of the ordinary Londoners must have moved back home and started rebuilding their own little homes. Winter isn't very far away. (It must have been a great time to be a builder in London - but then, it always is.)

Australian Susan   Link to this

"large building site"

Brisbane still has many wrecked empty houses after our January floods. One problem we have, which 17th c London probably had as well is shortage of tradespeople - so much work and not enough skilled people to do it. We also have the problem that these skilled people can earn much more doing truck driving or similar at mine sites, so naturally they go off to do this. Sam has not been having any house alterations recently. If he does, it will be interesting to learn if he has difficulties in getting the tradesmen to do it.

Glyn   Link to this

"Sam has not been having any house alterations recently. If he does, it will be interesting to learn if he has difficulties in getting the tradesmen to do it."

That's an extremely observant point. I'm not sure if it's completely correct, though. I think he has had some things done in the last year, but I suppose he would have had to pay more than pre-Fire.

Mary   Link to this

House improvements.

Glyn is right; it was only a few weeks ago that Sam had a new chimney-piece installed. However, this is the kind of 'accessory' that could, if necessary, be dismantled and moved to a different location - Brampton, for example.

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