Friday 1 May 1668

Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy. Then to Westminster Hall, and there met Sir W. Pen, who labours to have his answer to his impeachment, and sent down from the Lords’ House, read by the House of Commons; but they are so busy on other matters, that he cannot, and thereby will, as he believes, by design, be prevented from going to sea this year. Here met my cozen Thomas Pepys of Deptford, and took some turns with him; who is mightily troubled for this Act now passed against Conventicles, and in few words, and sober, do lament the condition we are in, by a negligent Prince and a mad Parliament. Thence I by coach to the Temple, and there set him down, and then to Sir G. Carteret’s to dine, but he not being at home, I back again to the New Exchange a little, and thence back again to Hercules Pillars, and there dined all alone, and then to the King’s playhouse, and there saw “The Surprizall;” and a disorder in the pit by its raining in, from the cupola at top, it being a very foul day, and cold, so as there are few I believe go to the Park to-day, if any. Thence to Westminster Hall, and there I understand how the Houses of Commons and Lords are like to disagree very much, about the business of the East India Company and one Skinner; to the latter of which the Lords have awarded 5000l. from the former, for some wrong done him heretofore; and the former appealing to the Commons, the Lords vote their petition a libell; and so there is like to follow very hot work. Thence by water, not being able to get a coach, nor boat but a sculler, and that with company, is being so foul a day, to the Old Swan, and so home, and there spent the evening, making Balty read to me, and so to supper and to bed.

6 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...it being so foul a day" is read by L&M.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...there spent the evening, making Balty read to me..."

I'll bet Balty loved that.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"this Act now passed against Conventicles"

L&M note the Act was not passed until 1670:
'Charles II, 1670: An Act to prevent and suppresse Seditious Conventicles.', Statutes of the Realm: volume 5: 1628-80 (1819), pp. 648-651. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Arthur Perry   Link to this

The hyperlink for "a negligent Prince" points to Prince Rupert, but it seems like Sam might be referring to King Charles II.

language hat   Link to this

Yes, I'm guessing the king is the intended referent.

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Thanks - I've changed the link now.

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