Sunday 22 March 1667/68

(Easter day). I up, and walked to the Temple, and there got a coach, and to White Hall, where spoke with several people, and find by all that Pen is to go to sea this year with this fleete; and they excuse the Prince’s going, by saying it is not a command great enough for him. Here I met with Brisband, and, after hearing the service at the King’s chapel, where I heard the Bishop of Norwich, Dr. Reynolds, the old presbyterian, begin a very plain sermon, he and I to the Queen’s chapel, and there did hear the Italians sing; and indeed their musick did appear most admirable to me, beyond anything of ours: I was never so well satisfied in my life with it. So back to White Hall, and there met Mr. Pierce, and adjusted together how we should spend to-morrow together, and so by coach I home to dinner, where Kate Joyce was, as I invited her, and had a good dinner, only she and us; and after dinner she and I alone to talk about her business, as I designed; and I find her very discreet, and she assures me she neither do nor will incline to the doing anything towards marriage, without my advice, and did tell me that she had many offers, and that Harman and his friends would fain have her; but he is poor, and hath poor friends, and so it will not be advisable: but that there is another, a tobacconist, one Holinshed, whom she speaks well of, to be a plain, sober man, and in good condition, that offers her very well, and submits to me my examining and inquiring after it, if I see good, which I do like of it, for it will be best for her to marry, I think, as soon as she can — at least, to be rid of this house; for the trade will not agree with a young widow, that is a little handsome, at least ordinary people think her so. Being well satisfied with her answer, she anon went away, and I to my closet to make a few more experiments of my notions in musique, and so then my wife and I to walk in the garden, and then home to supper and to bed.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Orrery to the Archbishop of Dublin
Written from: Charleville
Date: 22 March 1668

Sends a letter addressed to the Duke of Ormond, by which the Archbishop may guess (at least in part) the contents of the Duke's letter to the writer. ...

The Archbishop may be sure that the writer will not disserve him to whom he has promised service. ... "I believed", adds the writer, "my father [Richard, Earl of Cork] got a great estate very well, yet I was certain of it, after it had passed my Lord Strafford's [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/11015/ ] inquiry; so though my Lord Lieutenant [Ormond] is pleased not to believe the suggestions of my enemies, yet he would be certain they are false, when I have passed the trial I passionately desire to undergo." ...

Adds some particulars relating to Limerick ... and to a proposal of marriage between a son of Lord Shannon and a daughter of the Archbishop ... of which proposal he says, "the main objections are still in force, & not to be removed by him [Shannon]". ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Carl in Boston   Link to this

Being well satisfied with her answer, she anon went away
Forsooth, and what an example of wise advice to a young widow. She was very lucky to have such an advisor.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I heard the Bishop of Norwich, Dr. Reynolds, the old presbyterian, begin a very plain sermon"

L&M note Reynolds was the only moderate Presbyterian to accept a bishopric in 1661. As a preacher he was given to excessive quotation [a safe thing to do]. The sermon he preached on this occasion (on Hebrews 13:20-21: "Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant, Make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is wellpleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.") was published.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ...where I heard the Bishop of Norwich, Dr. Reynolds, the old presbyterian, begin a very plain sermon, ..."

[Reynolds, Edward, 1599-1676]
A sermon preached before the King at White-Hall, on March 22. 1667. being Easter-day. By Edward Lord Bishop of Norwich. Published by His Majesties command.
London : Printed by Thomas Ratcliffe and are to be sold by Robert Pawlett, at the Bible in Chancery Lane, 1668.

4to., [4], 34 p.
Wing (CD-Rom, 1996), R1283

Another issue:
London : printed by Thomas Ratcliffe, and are to be sold by Edward Thomas at the Adam and Eve in Little-Brittain, 1668.
Title page is a cancel. First leaf is blank and conjugate to cancel

No copy of either issue in the PL.

Spoiler -- SP did retain, given the title perhaps as an example of the triumph of hope over experience:

Self-deniall: opened and applied in a sermon before the reverend Assembly of Divines: on a day of their private humiliation. By Edward Reynoldes, minister of the Word of God at Braunston in Northamptonshire, and a member of that Assembly. Published by authority.
London : printed for Robert Bostock, dwelling at the signe of the Kings head in Pauls Church-yard, 1646 [i.e. 1645]

4to., [4], 47, [1] p.
Wing (CD-Rom, 1996), R1278

Sermon on Matthew 16 v 24:
AV (1611): Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

Geneva (1599): Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

[Sermons Polemical VI] PL 1184.20

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Michael, thanks for the bibliography and the reminder.

It's easy to forget the enormous importance published sermons had to many readers. Pepys mentions in the Diary buying a wide range of books, but fewer pamphlets and sermons by percentage than were on the popular market at the time and thereafter and still.
http://www.google.com/search?q=reading+sermons&...

Mary   Link to this

"a young widow that is a little handsome, at least ordinary people think her so."

Though of course no-one, Sam implies, could mistake her for a woman of breeding and consequence - but she has some appeal for the lower sort.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...a young widow, that is a little handsome, at least ordinary people think her so..."

If she were not a relative, she'd be right up Sam's back alley, given his caution in approaching women above a certain social level, certainly she'd be a fitting companion to Mrs. Burroughs.

Barry P. Reich   Link to this

Query: has SP expressed his favor for Italian music over English at any previous point?

Mary   Link to this

Barry.

Try using the Search box (top right-hand side of the page).

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Charles R's taste shifted after 1666 to favor the Italian rather than the French musical style and the King's Musick and the theatrical music changed accordingly. ( Search the L&M Companion for "Music" http://is.gd/vAWpfg )

Pepys followed suit.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Actually, Barry, the opposite. SP declared at one point that Italian music could never sound as good to an Englishman as English music. I commented at the time that there was a reason why Monteverdi is still treasured while the English musical hotshots of Pepys' time are mostly forgotten. But Sam does keep up with the current fashion, as Terry says.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

@ Barry P. Reich Query: has SP expressed his favor for Italian music over English at any previous point?

I think one can see the shift occurring over the past months, here are SP's two prior references to Mrs. Manuel's singing:

August 12 1667
"to Mrs. Manuel’s, the Jew’s wife, formerly a player, who we heard sing with one of the Italians that was there; and, indeed, she sings mightily well; and just after the Italian manner, but yet do not please me like one of Mrs. Knepp’s songs, to a good English tune, the manner of their ayre not pleasing me so well as the fashion of our own, nor so natural."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/08/12/

December 30th. 1667:
" ... and then with her to Mrs. Manuel’s, where Mrs. Pierce was, and her boy and girl; and here I did hear Mrs. Manuel and one of the Italians, her gallant, sing well. But yet I confess I am not delighted so much with it, as to admire it: for, not understanding the words, I lose the benefit of the vocalitys of the musick, and it proves only instrumental; and therefore was more pleased to hear Knepp sing two or three little English things that I understood, though the composition of the other, and performance, was very fine."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/12/30/

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