Wednesday 19 February 1667/68

Up, and to the office, where all the morning drawing up an answer to the Report of the Committee for miscarriages to the Parliament touching our paying men by tickets, which I did do in a very good manner I think. Dined with my clerks at home, where much good discourse of our business of the Navy, and the trouble now upon us, more than we expected. After dinner my wife out with Deb., to buy some things against my sister’s wedding, and I to the office to write fair my business I did in the morning, and in the evening to White Hall, where I find Sir W. Coventry all alone, a great while with the Duke of York, in the King’s drawing-room, they two talking together all alone, which did mightily please me. Then I did get Sir W. Coventry (the Duke of York being gone) aside, and there read over my paper, which he liked and corrected, and tells me it will be hard to escape, though the thing be never so fair, to have it voted a miscarriage; but did advise me and my Lord Brouncker, who coming by did join with us, to prepare some members in it, which we shall do. Here I do hear how La Roche, a French captain, who was once prisoner here, being with his ship at Plymouth, hath played some freakes there, for which his men being beat out of the town, he hath put up his flag of defiance, and also, somewhere thereabout, did land with his men, and go a mile into the country, and did some pranks, which sounds pretty odd, to our disgrace, but we are in condition now to bear any thing. But, blessed be God! all the Court is full of the good news of my Lord Sandwich’s having made a peace between Spain and Portugall, which is mighty great news, and, above all, to my Lord’s honour, more than any thing he ever did; and yet I do fear it will not prevail to secure him in Parliament against incivilities there. Thence, took up my wife at Unthanke’s, and so home, and there my mind being full of preparing my paper against to-morrow for the House, with an address from the office to the House, I to the office, very late, and then home to supper and to bed.

6 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"La Roche, a French captain, who was once prisoner here, being with his ship at Plymouth, hath played some freakes there, for which his men being beat out of the town, he hath put up his flag of defiance, and also, somewhere thereabout, did land with his men, and go a mile into the country, and did some pranks,"

The "freakes" or anomalous raids referred to here briefly, will have consequences partly related later. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/02/29/

Christopher Squire   Link to this

freakes:

‘freak, n.1 . . 3. A capricious prank or trick, a caper.
1724    J. Gay Quidnuncki's,   Thus, as in giddy freaks he bounces, Crack goes the twig, and in he flounces!
1840    R. H. Barham Jackdaw of Rheims in Ingoldsby Legends 1st Ser. 218   The priests, with awe, As such freaks they saw, Said, ‘The Devil must be in that little Jackdaw’.
1866    Trollope Belton Estate I. i. 6   Expelled from Harrow for some boyish freak.’ [OED]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"After dinner my wife out with Deb., to buy some things against my sister’s wedding..."

It's the wedding of the decade...Diary-wise at least. I wonder if we get an invite courtesy our hero.

"Pall's getting married in the morning...
Though I'd rather Cumberland, Jackson will do...
Bess, set the table...
Well, Jane...You're more able...
But get Pall to the church on time...

She'd better be there in the morning...
After all I've laid out failing to show would be a crime...
Tom Edwards, you're quite able...
Tie her to a table...
But get her to the church on time...

If she be crying, quiet her down...
Should I be wooing, say I'm called out of town...
But she's got to be there in the morning...
Spruced up by Bess and clear of any crime... (Pall give back that book)

Let her rail on me and flail me, but don't let Jackson fail me...
Get her to the church, yes drag her to the church...
For my sake, get her to that church on time...

Starlight is reeling home to bed now...
My eyes worn out from reading all this time...
London is waking...Daylight is breakin'...
Good luck ole Pall...Good health...Good bye...

She's gettin' married in the morning...
Thank God the wedding bells will chime...

Hail and salute her...As I haul off to boot her...
Not to get her off my hands would be...A...Crime."

Paul   Link to this

Terry: The "freakes" link does not work.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Paul, it will (or is written to) 10 days from now, when Pepys reports more.

Paul   Link to this

Terry: Sorry, I didn't understand that.

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