Thursday 20 February 1667/68

Up, and to the office a while, and thence to White Hall by coach with Mr. Batelier with me, whom I took up in the street. I thence by water to Westminster Hall, and there with Lord Brouncker, Sir T. Harvy, Sir J. Minnes, did wait all the morning to speak to members about our business, thinking our business of tickets would come before the House to-day, but we did alter our minds about the petition to the House, sending in the paper to them. But the truth is we were in a great hurry, but it fell out that they were most of the morning upon the business of not prosecuting the first victory; which they have voted one of the greatest miscarriages of the whole war, though they cannot lay the fault anywhere yet, because Harman is not come home. This kept them all the morning, which I was glad of. So down to the Hall, where my wife by agreement stayed for me at Mrs. Michell’s, and there was Mercer and the girl, and I took them to Wilkinson’s the cook’s in King Street (where I find the master of the house hath been dead for some time), and there dined, and thence by one o’clock to the King’s house: a new play, “The Duke of Lerma,” of Sir Robert Howard’s: where the King and Court was; and Knepp and Nell spoke the prologue most excellently, especially Knepp, who spoke beyond any creature I ever, heard. The play designed to reproach our King with his mistresses, that I was troubled for it, and expected it should be interrupted; but it ended all well, which salved all. The play a well-writ and good play, only its design I did not like of reproaching the King, but altogether a very good and most serious play. Thence home, and there a little to the office, and so home to supper, where Mercer with us, and sang, and then to bed.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

Feb: 20. 1667/8. Dr. Clark to try transfusion on madwoman) Dr. Wren of a boy that had a consumption of bones inquired after)

Letter feb: 10. 68. from carcanis [ http://is.gd/VtmQix ?} about correspondence)

Smethwicks 4 foot telescope not sphericall

expt. of weighing tin & copper was made soe as 2 pieces of these 2 metalls were weighed both asunder & mixed in the air & water, and it appeard tht the compound was heauier than the parts separated the curator was ord: to giue it in writing as also Desc of Cider eng. astron: Ind of new pend & expt. of fish (-

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Christopher Squire   Link to this

re: ’but it ended all well, which salved all. ’:

‘salve, v.2
. . 4.a. To preserve or maintain unhurt (one's honour, credit, reputation, etc.) . .
1596    Spenser Second Pt. Faerie Queene iv. iv. 27   To salve his name And purchase honour to his friends behalve.
1607    B. Jonson Volpone iv. iv. 8,   I deuis'd a formall tale, That salu'd your reputation.
. . 1668    T. Smith Jrnl. Voy. Constantinople in Miscellanea Curiosa (Royal Soc.) (1707) III. 7   The Seamen, to salve their Credit, and to excuse their Error,‥pretended that we were set in by a strong Current . . ‘ [OED]

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"But the truth is we were in a great hurry, but it fell out that they were most of the morning upon the business of not prosecuting the first victory; which they have voted one of the greatest miscarriages of the whole war, though they cannot lay the fault anywhere yet, because Harman is not come home."

Grey's Debates
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

JWB   Link to this

Mixing tin & cooper should yield weight equal to addition of each part,alloyed or not.. Melted, of course, the two make bronze. How they were mixed under water in any meaningful way is mystery. Manufacture of brass in England, by the way, had just recently begun, even before separation of zinc as a metal.

language hat   Link to this

"only its design I did not like of reproaching the King"

It's OK for Sam to reproach the King in his diary, and to do so in private conversations with friends he knows well enough to trust, but for someone to do so in public... for shame!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I took them to Wilkinson’s the cook’s in King Street (where I find the master of the house hath been dead for some time), and there dined..."

One might ask...What did he die of?

Nate   Link to this

"Mixing tin & cooper should yield weight ..."

I thought that they might have meant denser but if they used a "good" proportion, 8%-14% tin, then the bronze should be less dense than copper and a bit more dense than tin. Strange.

sean adams   Link to this

“Mixing tin & cooper should yield weight …”

You are right Nate - the density of tin bronze should be between that of copper and tin - see the link below.

http://www.simetric.co.uk/si_metals.htm

JWB   Link to this

Some of us more dense than others. Of course now I see, the note did not mean "mixed in the air and under water", but weighed...in the air and under water.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

JWB, it seems then to play out thus as the "2 pieces of these 2 metalls were weighed"
In what state were these 2 metals? "both asunder & mixed"
Where were they weighed? " in the air & [in the] water"

JWB   Link to this

Ist das nicht die Bronze Dichte?
Ya, das ist die Bronze Dichte.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"thence by one o’clock to the King’s house:"

L&M note 2 1/2 hours before the customary time plays commenced.

nix   Link to this

" I took them to Wilkinson’s the cook’s in King Street #where I find the master of the house hath been dead for some time#" --

MS. LOVETT:
Here we are. Hot out of the oven

TODD:
What is that?

MS. LOVETT:
Its priest
Have a little priest

TODD:
Is it really good?

MS. LOVETT:
Sir, it’s too good, at least
Then again they don’t commit sins of the flesh
So it’s pretty fresh

TODD:
Awful lot of fat

MS. LOVETT:
Only where it sat

. . . .

TODD
Anything that’s lean?

MS. LOVETT:
Well then if you’re British and loyal
You might enjoy royal marine
Anyway it’s clean
Though of course it tastes of wherever it’s been!

. . . .

TODD (spoken):
What is that?

MS. LOVETT:
It’s fop
Finest in the shop
Or we have some shepherds pie peppered
With actual shepherd on top!
And I’ve just begun
Is the politician so oily it’s served with a doily?
Have one!

TODD:
Put it on a bun
Well you never know if it’s going to run!

MS. LOVETT:
Try the friar!
Fried, it’s drier!

TODD:
No!
The clergy is really too coarse and too mealy!

MS. LOVETT:
Then actor!
It’s compacter!

TODD:
Ah, but always arrives overdone
(spoken) I’ll come again when you have judge on the menu

Have charity towards the world, my pet!

MS. LOVETT:
Yes, yes, I know, my love

TODD:
We’ll take the customers that we can get!

MS. LOVETT:
High-born and low, my love!

TODD:
We’ll not discriminate great from small
No, we’ll serve anyone

(simultaneously)

MS. LOVETT:
We’ll serve anyone!

TODD:
Meaning anyone!

BOTH:
And to anyone
At all!

http://www.sweetslyrics.com/557095.Stephen%20So...

Australian Susan   Link to this

Unsavoury Chefs (soon to die?) have been around for a while:

"A cook they hadde with hem for the nones
To boile the chiknes with the marybones
And pourde-marchant tart and galyngale
Wel koude he knowe a draughte of Londoun ale
He koude roste, and sethe, and broille and frye,
Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye.
But greet harm was it, as it thoughte me,
That on his shyne, a mormal hadde he.
For blankmanger, that made he with thr beste."

Proplogue to the Canterbury Tales, lines 379-387.

A mormal was a gangrenous ulcer.
Mortreux were stews.
Pourdre-marchant means spiced or flavoured.

I love Chaucer's humour in adding the little extra bit of information - "and he makes blancmange as good as anyone's!" - just when you have gone off totally touching anything he's cooked.....

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