Tuesday 14 January 1667/68

At the office all the morning, and at noon home to dinner, and after dinner with Mr. Clerke and Gibson to the Temple (my wife and girle going further by coach), and there at the Auditor’s did begin the examining my Tangier accounts, and did make a great entry into it and with great satisfaction, and I am glad I am so far eased. So appointing another day for further part of my accounts, I with Gibson to my bookseller, Martin, and there did receive my book I expected of China, a most excellent book with rare cuts; and there fell into discourse with him about the burning of Paul’s when the City was burned; his house being in the church-yard. And he tells me that it took fire first upon the end of a board that, among others, was laid upon the roof instead of lead, the lead being broke off, and thence down lower and lower: but that the burning of the goods under St. Fayth’s arose from the goods taking fire in the church-yard, and so got into St. Fayth’s Church; and that they first took fire from the Draper’s side, by some timber of the houses that were burned falling into the church. He says that one warehouse of books was saved under Paul’s; and he says that there were several dogs found burned among the goods in the church-yard, and but one man, which was an old man, that said he would go and save a blanket which he had in the church, and, being a weak old man, the fire overcome him, and was burned. He says that most of the booksellers do design to fall a-building again the next year; but he says that the Bishop of London do use them most basely, worse than any other landlords, and says he will be paid to this day the rent, or else he will not come to treat with them for the time to come; and will not, on that condition either, promise them any thing how he will use them; and, the Parliament sitting, he claims his privilege, and will not be cited before the Lord Chief justice, as others are there, to be forced to a fair dealing. Thence by coach to Mrs. Pierce’s, where my wife and Deb. is; and there they fell to discourse of the last night’s work at Court, where the ladies and Duke of Monmouth and others acted “The Indian Emperour;” wherein they told me these things most remark able: that not any woman but the Duchesse of Monmouth and Mrs. Cornwallis did any thing but like fools and stocks, but that these two did do most extraordinary well: that not any man did any thing well but Captain O’Bryan, who spoke and did well, but, above all things, did dance most incomparably. That she did sit near the players of the Duke’s house; among the rest, Mis Davis, who is the most impertinent slut, she says, in the world; and the more, now the King do show her countenance; and is reckoned his mistress, even to the scorne of the whole world; the King gazing on her, and my Lady Castlemayne being melancholy and out of humour, all the play, not smiling once. The King, it seems, hath given her a ring of 700l., which she shews to every body, and owns that the King did give it her; and he hath furnished a house for her in Suffolke Street most richly, which is a most infinite shame. It seems she is a bastard of Colonell Howard, my Lord Berkshire, and that he do pimp to her for the King, and hath got her for him; but Pierce says that she is a most homely jade as ever she saw, though she dances beyond any thing in the world. She tells me that the Duchesse of Richmond do not yet come to the Court, nor hath seen the King, nor will not, nor do he own his desire of seeing her; but hath used means to get her to Court, but they do not take. Thence home, and there I to my chamber, having a great many books brought me home from my bookbinder’s, and so I to the new setting of my books against the next year, which costs me more trouble than I expected, and at it till two o’clock in the morning, and then to bed, the business not being yet done to my mind. This evening come Mr. Mills and his wife to see and sit and talk with us, which they did till 9 o’clock at night, and then parted, and I to my books.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The King to Ormond
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 14 January 1668

The appeal exhibited by Dr Robert Gorges, on behalf of H.R.H. the Duke of York, against certain decisions of the Commissioners of the Court of Claims in Ireland is to be taken off the file and cancelled; no such appeal being warranted by the Acts of Settlement & Explanation. ...

But the subject-matter of the said appeal is to be heard, by way of complaint; and full inquiry into all the allegations thereof to be instituted, and the result to be reported to the King. ...
____

Ormond to Arlington
Written from: Dublin
Date: 14 January 1668

... Observes a wonderful wariness in most of those who should bear their parts in the management of affairs here, whilst others assume great confidence in disturbing them, under the countenance [i.e. the colour, or pretence] of law. And those who most insist on the ... privilege of laws, are for the most part such as in times past allowed others no share in them. This appears in nothing more than in the opposition given, in most towns, to the quartering of the Army. ...

Sir Allan Brodrick ... sent a Vote of the House of Commons to his deputy, by which his Majesty's officers ... are required to bring in ... an account of all lands, rents, &c alienated [in MS.: "alien'd"] from the Crown, since '41 (as the Duke takes it). ... The officers ... apply to the writer who is unable to direct them, having no command from his Majesty ... and concerning the proceedings of 'the Long Parliament' to be no rules to go by now. ...
_____

Warrant, by the Duke of Ormond, to the Seneschal of the Liberties of the Lord Archbishop of Dublin, concerning quarters for the foot company, commanded by Captain Charles Feilding, and forming part of the Regiment of Guards
Written from: Dublin Castle
Date: 14 January 1668

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Is that the famous "Kettle drums" O'Bryan?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Deb seems a bit young for such risque conversation...I wonder that Bess didn't head her home but I suppose the temptation of exquisite gossip with Sam and his smart friends was too much.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Outrageous, Martin. Outrageous. Trust that I shall acquaint the Duke with this business. Well, wonderful job on the China book...Yes." Glance round...

Hmmn...

"Thank ye, Mr. Pepys. Was there anything else?"

"Uh..." Glance round...Hmmn...

Ah...

No, not it. Risk a brief search? No, damnit...Gibson's still here admiring the dratted China thing.

"Oh, no. Just looking round one last time...Never know what might turn up..."

In brown paper wrapper...

"Gibson, perhaps you should..."

"You wanted me to remind you about your appointment to meet Mrs. Pepys,sir."

Hmmn...?

Oh...Yes...

He couldn't have already sold it? Damn, it would be just like that rogue Penn to have snapped it right up the first day, the perverse fellow. No shame in him, he'd buy it and happily saunter down the street, reading from it, indulging his wantoness. Whereas some, like myself, could acquire much important worldly knowledge from...

"Sir?"

"Uh, yes...Right. Mrs. Pepys."

Must remember to ask Bess about her school days in Paris again...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"he says that the Bishop of London do use them most basely, worse than any other landlords, and says he will be paid to this day the rent, or else he will not come to treat with them for the time to come; and will not, on that condition either, promise them any thing how he will use them; and, the Parliament sitting, he claims his privilege, and will not be cited before the Lord Chief justice, as others are there, to be forced to a fair dealing."

L&M note "the Court of Claims set up under Lord Chief Justice Kelynge to deal with the complicated interests in real property destroyed by the Fire, usually remitted rents accruing after 1 September 1666, provided the tenant paid for rebuilding. Only where the rent was a ground rent [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_rent ] or little more , and a substantial fine had been paid many years before, was rent often exacted as suggested here."

It sounds to me that the Bishop is appealing to a very long-term exclusive lease arrangement that booksellers in St Paul's Yard had enjoyed, and John Martin is whining; but I appeal to nix or someone else , who knows far more law than I to clarify this, if possible.

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...but one man, which was an old man, that said he would go and save a blanket which he had in the church, and, being a weak old man, the fire overcome him, and was burned. ..."

Timelessly poignant. Repeated in so many disasters.

Re TF's comment

All very apposite for our situation in Brisbane. It will be interesting to see how landlords behave here. Already we have had problems with looters and profiteers ($10 for a loaf of bread would you believe). Just as what happened after The Great Fire. The nastier sides of human behaviour seep out across the ages.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Martin's complaint

L&M further note, and source the claim that "[t]he Bishop of London, Humphrey Henchman, was said to have been harsh in dealing with the booksellers and mercers of Paternoster Row, and to have claimed his parliamentary privilege as a peer to protect himself against citation to the Court;"

Perhaps my interpretation above was mistaken.

sbt   Link to this

R Gertz. Deb was 17 at this date. Elizabeth was a married woman at 15. The 'Age of Consent' in the UK today is 16, as it is in many US States.

Whilst for many purposes she would be classed as a minor in both the UK and US she would be expected to be sexually aware at 17 in both countries today and even more so in the Restoration period.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I would say Deb seems younger in nature, given Sam's constant referrence to her as the girl and Bess herself generally seems to have been kept out of such worldly society by Sam...Usually she is noted as attending christenings and the like not "All about Mrs. Davis" gossipfests.

Not that I really think neither had ever heard this sort of thing befoe. In fact it's rather a confirmation that Bess is not as innocent of the Court world as Sam's referrences to her activities might suggest.

language hat   Link to this

"I would say Deb seems younger in nature, given Sam’s constant referrence to her as the girl"

Nothing to do with age. OED:

girl 7. a. A female servant or domestic employee; a maid (now chiefly hist.). Now more generally: a female employee. Freq. with connotations of social inferiority. ...
1668 S. Pepys Diary 24 Aug. (1976) IX. 287 My wife is upon hanging the long chamber, where the girl lies, with the sad stuff that was in the best chamber.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Younger in nature not actual age...But again though Deb gives an air of innocence in the entries, I don't really believe Bess or Deb have ever been spared such adult conversation just that Sam has previously seemed careful about keeping Bess away from such Court world things...Gradually the walls have been crumbling and Sam has let or been unable to prevent that other world come seeping in.

nix   Link to this

A landlord who thinks the rent is below market won't cut the tenants much slack, and will look for any legal excuse to terminate them. That is undoubtedly the case with the Bishop -- he is looking to build a new, bigger, grander St. Paul's, and undoubtedly thinks a gaggle of booksellers' stalls is not the "highest and best use" of this strategic property.

And isn't "Humphrey Henchman" a perfect name for a bishop? Surely, if it hadn't already been taken, Dickens would have used it.

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