Thursday 31 October 1667

Up, and all the morning at the office, and at noon Mr. Creed and Yeabsly dined with me (my wife gone to dine with Mrs. Pierce and see a play with her), and after dinner in comes Mr. Turner, of Eynsbury, lately come to town, and also after him Captain Hill of the “Coventry,” who lost her at Barbadoes, and is come out of France, where he hath been long prisoner. After a great deal of mixed discourse, and then Mr. Turner and I alone a little in my closet, talking about my Lord Sandwich (who I hear is now ordered by the King to come home again), we all parted, and I by water, calling at Michell’s, and saw and once kissed su wife, but I do think that he is jealous of her, and so she dares not stand out of his sight; so could not do more, but away by water to the Temple, and there, after spending a little time in my bookseller’s shop, I to Westminster; and there at the lobby do hear by Commissioner Pett, to my great amazement, that he is in worse condition than before, by the coming in of the Duke of Albemarle’s and Prince Rupert’s Narratives’ this day; wherein the former do most severely lay matters upon him, so as the House this day have, I think, ordered him to the Tower again, or something like it; so that the poor man is likely to be overthrown, I doubt, right or wrong, so infinite fond they are of any thing the Duke of Albemarle says or writes to them! I did then go down, and there met with Colonel Reames and cozen Roger Pepys; and there they do tell me how the Duke of Albemarle and the Prince have laid blame on a great many, and particularly on our Office in general; and particularly for want of provision, wherein I shall come to be questioned again in that business myself; which do trouble me. But my cozen Pepys and I had much discourse alone: and he do bewail the constitution of this House, and says there is a direct caball and faction, as much as is possible between those for and those against the Chancellor, and so in other factions, that there is nothing almost done honestly and with integrity; only some few, he says, there are, that do keep out of all plots and combinations, and when their time comes will speak and see right done, if possible; and that he himself is looked upon to be a man that will be of no faction, and so they do shun to make him; and I am glad of it. He tells me that he thanks God he never knew what it was to be tempted to be a knave in his life; till he did come into the House of Commons, where there is nothing done but by passion, and faction, and private interest. Reames did tell me of a fellow last night (one Kelsy, a commander of a fire-ship, who complained for want of his money paid him) did say that he did see one of the Commissioners of the Navy bring in three waggon-loads of prize-goods into Greenwich one night; but that the House did take no notice of it, nor enquire; but this is me, and I must expect to be called to account, and answer what I did as well as I can. So thence away home, and in Holborne, going round, it being dark, I espied Sir D. Gawden’s coach, and so went out of mine into his; and there had opportunity to talk of the business of victuals, which the Duke of Albemarle and Prince did complain that they were in want of the last year: but we do conclude we shall be able to show quite the contrary of that; only it troubles me that we must come to contend with these great persons, which will overrun us. So with some disquiet in my mind on this account I home, and there comes Mr. Yeabsly, and he and I to even some accounts, wherein I shall be a gainer about 200l., which is a seasonable profit, for I have got nothing a great while; and he being gone, I to bed.

16 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

66
Oct. 31. 1667. (mr Euelyns tables [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evelyn_tables ]) to mr Hooke)

Dr. Lowers account of tying the vena caua to giue a dropsy [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edema ] to a dog) tying the jugulars) Dr. King tryd the same but fayled.) Dr. Lower tht making the Receptac: chyli [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisterna_chyli ]. will make the Lungs adhere to the side

The Curator produced 2 instruments of his own contriuance. one he calld a perfect wheel work [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gear ] soe made as aequally to communicate the strength of the first wheel to the Last the teeth of it being always taking soe as before one tooth hath done taking its past a good way into another. the other was an Instrument for obseruing the Diameters poistions & angles of the starrs conceiud to be more plaine and easy and lesse chargable than that of mr Townly he was desired to bring in his account of both in Writing and to take care that mr Townly who had formerly comunicated to the Society an Intrument for the like purpose might be made acquainted wth. this new contriuance

the magneticall expt. which was tryed the Last meeting with a seeming successe was tryed againe this Day but succeeded not at all. The Curator was desired to giue this in writing the vnsuceeding Expt. being as well to be registred as those tht Succeed.

(mr Collins of chesshire salt [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_in_Cheshire ].) mr. Hooke was desired to draw vp querys concerning salt that might be giuen to him that had giuen mr. Collins an account of salt makers)

Dr. Allen Scrupelling the transfusion tryall mr. Hooke was desire to meet him at Sr. G. Ents house wth some other physitians) Expt. for next day

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

31st October, 1667. My birthday — blessed be God for all his mercies! I made the Royal Society a present of the Table of Veins, Arteries, and Nerves [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evelyn_tables ], which great curiosity I had caused to be made in Italy, out of the natural human bodies, by a learned physician, and the help of Veslingius (professor at Padua)
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Vesling ], from whence I brought them in 1646. For this I received the public thanks of the Society; and they are hanging up in their repository with an inscription.

http://is.gd/fY5jv

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Barker's, &c. Petition.

A Petition of William Barker [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/09/03/#c30... ], William Bulckley, and others, was read; complaining of some Wrongs and Injuries done to them, touching Lands in Ireland:

And Mr. Barker and Mr. Bulkley being called in; and, in the Behalf of themselves, and others, owning the Petition, and offering to make good the Substance of it;

Ordered, That this Petition be referred to the Committee of Grievances; to examine the Matter of the Petition; and report it, with their Opinions therein, to the House: And the Committee are hereby ordered, to sit on Wednesday next; and to take this Petition into Consideration: And, that no other Committee do sit that Day. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Evelyn's remarkable Tables were published in 1702: "An Account of Divers Schemes of Arteries and Veins, Dissected from Adult Human Bodies, and Given to the Repository of the Royal Society by John Evelyn, Esq; E. R. S. To Which are Subjoyn'd a Description of the Extremities of Those Vessels, and the Manner the Blood is Seen, by the Microscope, to Pass from the Arteries to the Veins in Quadrupeds When Living: With Some Chirurgical Observations, and Figures after the Life, by William Cowper, F. R. S." Phil. Trans. 1702 23:1177-1201 http://rstl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/...
(Scroll down to the bottom of the PDF to see the remarkable figures.)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"The Curator was desired to giue this in writing the vnsuceeding Expt. being as well to be registred as those tht Succeed. "

Thus prefiguring the Journal of Negative Results
http://www.jnr-eeb.org/index.php/jnr

JWB   Link to this

"...he thanks God he never knew what it was to be tempted to be a knave in his life..."

Reminds me of this from Alexandra Mullin's review of "Fruitlands" in the 'Wall St. Journal': "Mr. Francis reports a conversation that Alcott once had with Henry James Sr., the father of the novelist Henry and the philosopher William. Alcott let it drop that he, like Jesus and Pythagoras before him, had never sinned. James asked whether Alcott had ever said, "I am the Resurrection and the Life." "Yes, often," Alcott replied. Unfortunately, Mr. Francis fails to record James's rejoinder: "And has anyone ever believed you?"

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"…my wife gone to dine with Mrs. Pierce and see a play with her..."

Bad influence...I'm surprised Sam allows Bess to go out with "Painting Betty Pierce".

"saw and once kissed su wife, but I do think that he is jealous of her, and so she dares not stand out of his sight; so could not do more..."

About time we encountered a jealous husband blocking Sam's way.

"He tells me that he thanks God he never knew what it was to be tempted to be a knave in his life; till he did come into the House of Commons, where there is nothing done but by passion, and faction, and private interest."

I can't help thinking there's no legislature at any period in history, including ones now honored for their accomplishments which in their own time at least didn't receive such condemnation. Perhaps the real danger sign of dictatorship is when someone isn't accusing the legislature of being divided by faction, passion, and corruption.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Reames did tell me of a fellow last night (one Kelsy, a commander of a fire-ship, who complained for want of his money paid him) did say that he did see one of the Commissioners of the Navy bring in three waggon-loads of prize-goods into Greenwich one night; but that the House did take no notice of it, nor enquire; but this is me, and I must expect to be called to account, and answer what I did as well as I can."

Odd that it should surface this way...I'd've have thought many around Court had heard the tale of Pepys and his prize goods. Since the Duke did sign off on the transaction I wonder if that's more security or danger for Sam.

Robert Gertz   Link to this


"Bad days, Captain Hill, bad days...But we shall endure."

"I hope so Mr. Pepys. Well..." pause...

"Anything else, Captain?"

"Sir...Is your girl out? The one with the brother sent off to sea?" anxious expression...

"Jane, why yes. Out with Mrs. Pepys. Oh...Did you have news of young Wayneman at Barbadoes?"

"I...I'm afraid so, sir."

Hmmn...Sam nods. "A pity, a sad pity. But, there was little could be done for the poor boy...Headstrong and headed in a bad way, you know."

"Yes sir...But...Mr. Pepys..."

"Captain?"

"While I was in Barbadoes, after the Coventry was lost...I heard stories, sir."

"I should hope so...Anything interesting, Hill?" Sam leans back in chair.

"About young Birch, sir... Sir, the boy they say died a most horrible death in the fields."

"Tragic...And?..."

"Well, sir. There was talk that he had consorted with some of the locals."

"About what I'd've expected of the boy." frown.

"Some of the locals who dealt with the Arts, sir."

"Arts, Captain?"

"Sam'l?" Bess from outside the study. "We're back. Are you playing music? It's bothering the girls."

Music?...Sam stares...

Come to think of it...I do hear...

"Not us. We're busy, Bess...Give us a moment."

"That's the music..." Hill blinks... "All the way back from Barbadoes, we heard that music in the air."

Hmmn...Must be from Penn's. Just like him to try and top my musicians. But he'll never manage it with that repetitive tune drumming over and over...

Though it does get a bit on the nerves...

"You were saying, Captain...I must be off soon, a riverboat staying for me."

"The Black Arts, Mr. Pepys. And they said he was consulting them about means...Of taking vengeance. On those who sent him to that Hell on Earth."

"I should be surprised he'd blame others for his lack of character. Though it's nice to hear he displayed some modicum of initative...Anyway, since you say the lad is deceased, I shall choose to overlook it. We'll say nothing to dear Jane."

"Sir...The stories say...He knew he would die and planned to come back...And take vengeance."

Note for Hewer...Do not plan on offering Captain Hill new employment at sea.

"My men swore they saw a strange figure lurking in parts of the ship we took back to England. That he was responsible for killing six of my men with his bare hands."

"Shocking...Obviously stowaways...And escaping Barbadoes...Not really surprising Captain. I will bring it up at the next Board meeting. Security should be tightened at the ports."

"Sir...This figure wasn't human...They shot at him...Nothing...The murdered men were strong men and stabbed and slashed at him...Nothing..."

"Strange he should wish to 'lurk' for weeks, then, eh? Why not kill you all and be done with it, eh?"

"He wanted to reach England, the men figured...Sir...I didn't believe myself...Until we were nearly home...And that night I had the men search the ship from stem to stern, me with them. And I saw him...Shot at him at point-blank range...Saw him break the back of one of my strongest men as like breaking a chicken bone...Saw him leap from the bow."

"Into the sea, miles from shore? Problem solved, I should think."

"Sir."

"Thank you for the warning, Hill."

***
Later...

Mr. Yeasbly departed, Sam counting his gains...Literally...

Lightning outside...Revealing a figure watching the house...A gaunt figure in rags...Bearing sugar cane cutting machete...

Paul Chapin   Link to this

The old saying comes to mind, success has a thousand fathers but failure is an orphan. Poor Pett, an artisan, simply has no idea how to play this political game, so he is a convenient scapegoat.

Bryan M   Link to this

Evelyn Tables

The link below has photos of the tables (at the Royal College of Surgeons of England Online Collection).

http://surgicat.rcseng.ac.uk/(znw1vaajy5awtrr3x...

Thanks to Terry for his all his work providing the wonderful background material.

Bryan M   Link to this

Evelyn Tables (ii)

The link above doesn't work; hopefully an indirect link will. Go to:

http://surgicat.rcseng.ac.uk

Select the Search tab and enter "Evelyn table" into the Free Search box.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Don't know as to Pett...The Petts have done a good job of maintaining their shipbuilding monopoly and court influence over the years, yet he does seem at sea with the politicians on this one. On the other hand, experienced and "connected", even quite powerful men (Clarendon, Cardinal Wolsey for an earlier example) get tossed to the wolves all the time when the government feels a sacrifice must be made. Part of the territory I guess...

nix   Link to this

"he never knew what it was to be tempted to be a knave in his life; till he did come into the House of Commons" --

Mark Twain will observe two centuries hence: "It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress."

Glyn   Link to this

Well done, Sam, on planning ahead on how to defend yourself against the forthcoming attack - a lot of people would behave like ostriches instead until it was too late. But considering Sam's own criticism of his colleagues in the Navy Office, perhaps they do deserve some of the blame.

"there is a direct caball and faction, as much as is possible between those for and those against the Chancellor..." which may in fact be a good thing if it leads to the creation of a party system of government rather than everyone being assumed to be on one side (i.e. the government's).

Australian Susan   Link to this

@BryanM - wonderful pictures of an amazing piece of work. Thank you

@nix - great quotation from MT!

And thank you to Terry for all his background work - it is much appreciated, even if I don't say so often enough!

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