Friday 13 September 1667

Called up by people come to deliver in ten chaldron of coals, brought in one of our prizes from Newcastle. The rest we intend to sell, we having above ten chaldron between us. They sell at about 28s. or 29s. per chaldron; but Sir W. Batten hath sworn that he was a cuckold that sells under 30s., and that makes us lay up all but what we have for our own spending, which is very pleasant; for I believe we shall be glad to sell them for less. To the office, and there despatched business till ten o’clock, and then with Sir W. Batten and my wife and Mrs. Turner by hackney-coach to Walthamstow, to Mrs. Shipman’s to dinner, where Sir W. Pen and my Lady and Mrs. Lowther (the latter of which hath got a sore nose, given her, I believe, from her husband, which made me I could not look upon her with any pleasure), and here a very good and plentifull wholesome dinner, and, above all thing, such plenty of milk meats, she keeping a great dairy, and so good as I never met with. The afternoon proved very foul weather, the morning fair. We staid talking till evening, and then home, and there to my flageolet with my wife, and so to bed without any supper, my belly being full and dinner not digested. It vexed me to hear how Sir W. Pen, who come alone from London, being to send his coachman for his wife and daughter, and bidding his coachman in much anger to go for them (he being vexed, like a rogue, to do anything to please his wife), his coachman Tom was heard to say a pox, or God rot her, can she walk hither? These words do so mad me that I could find in my heart to give him or my Lady notice of them.

20 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

13th September, 1667. Between the hours of twelve and one, was born my second daughter, who was afterward christened Elizabeth.

http://bit.ly/d482SJ

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Clarendon
Written from: Kilkenny
Date: 13 September 1667

The first letter that ever gave the Duke the least notice that the taking away of the Great Seal was thought of, was dated 24th August; by letters of the 31st he was assured that it was done. Of the reason, or manner, more than that in general it was said to be for the King's ease, & for Clarendon's security, he is still ignorant. ...

How little soever it can contribute to Clarendon's own contentment, he will not, the writer knows ... refuse him the knowledge of what it may be proper to inform him of. ... The substance of the misfortune is not without many precedents; familiar to Lord Clarendon in History; some, his own experience can furnish. Circumstances may aggravate, or may alleviate; but the succours from within are what make all crosses supportable. It is the writer's hearty prayer that of such succours Clarendon may find plenty. ...

The bearer, Mr Ryves, is one of the writer's family. ...
_____

Ormond to Arlington
Written from: Kilkenny
Date: 13 September 1667

A week has been spent here in diligent conference on the business of Revenue. The result is that the King is in greater debt to the Army, and otherwise, than his Exchequer is like to pay; yet the debt is not so great as was feared. If Peace continue, there is hope in course of time to overcome it. ... Among the measures to be proposed to his Majesty is the sending hither of £30,000, in milled brass, or copper, farthings, coined; or else of the workmen, tools, & materials, requisite for the coining of them here.

Answer to his Lordship's letter of 14th August, and an account of the Guinea ship, come to Lord Arlington from the Council Board. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Australian Susan   Link to this

Milk meats are dishes made from milk. Wonder what they had? Junket? And is perhaps our Sam lactose intolerant if he still felt his food was undigested hours later.

cum salis grano   Link to this

milk meats maybe just maybe milk fed beef and or swine.

cum salis grano   Link to this

OED:
milkmeat, n.
Food made with or from milk.
1440 Promp. Parv. (Harl. 221) 338/1 Mylke mete, or mete made wythe mylke.
c1450 in T. Austin Two 15th-cent. Cookery-bks. (1888) 106 Milkemete. Take faire mylke and floure [etc.].

1582 S. BATEMAN Vppon Bartholome, De Proprietatibus Rerum XV. 244 The men..eate seld before the Sunne going downe, and use flesh, milke meats, fish, & fruits, more then Britons.
1633 Court Bk. Bishopric of Orkney f. 89, {Ygh}e cam to hir and brocht with {ygh}ow some melk meat.
1699 Philos. Trans. (Royal Soc.) 21 62 The various sorts of Cheese, and some other Milk-Meats, made in Italy

1764 T. HARMER Observ. X. iv. 154 One would have imagined..the Septuagint would have been at no loss in translating passages which speak of cheese, or in determining what they meant, if some other kind of milk~meats were meant in them.
1825 J. JAMIESON Etymol. Dict. Sc. Lang. Suppl., Milk-meat, milk and meal boiled together. 1876 F. K. ROBINSON Gloss. Words Whitby, Milk-meeats, custards, cheesecakes or curd-cakes, &c.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

FWIW, the L&M Large Glossary defines "milke-meat" as "dairy produce."

cum salis grano   Link to this

They sell at about 28s. or 29s. per chaldron
Sell by the bucket.

Dawn   Link to this

"John Evelyn’s Diary
13th September, 1667. Between the hours of twelve and one, was born my second daughter, who was afterward christened Elizabeth."

How many Elizabeths are to be found in this diary now? Its still a popular name today.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"Called up by people come to deliver in ten chaldron of coals, ... and that makes us lay up all but what we have for our own spending, ..."

Am I the only one to see Seething Lane and the Navy Office courtyards filling with mountain ranges of coal? Brings to mind the apocryphal story of Keynes, when Bursar, forgetting about forward cover for a futures contract and, to the consternation of the Fellows, the King's College quad being filled up with a delivery of bales of rubber

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...bidding his coachman in much anger to go for them #he being vexed, like a rogue, to do anything to please his wife#..."

Bit hard to tell if Sam is denouncing Penn as too willing to please Lady Penn (wuss) or for going about it in a put-upon, rudely angry manner (jerk), though I think the latter. After all, for all his infidelities and his occasional lapses into boorish behavior, Sam does strive to make Bess happy...And frequently suggests his valiant efforts to secure her future as well as his are what entitle him to a bit of fun now and then.

Phoenix   Link to this

Fun to imagine but not quite mountainous. Ten chaldrons would approximate a pile 5x8x10 feet. Enough work for man and horse to handle and probably too much for many of us today.

Mary   Link to this

Those chaldrons.

We don't know what kind of chaldrons Sam is talking about here. The Newcastle chaldron was legally fixed at 52.5 cwt in 1678 (5880lbs) whereas the London chaldron was much smaller at 28cwt (3136lbs).

language hat   Link to this

"It vexed me to hear how Sir W. Pen, who come alone from London, being to send his coachman for his wife and daughter, and bidding his coachman in much anger to go for them (he being vexed, like a rogue, to do anything to please his wife), his coachman Tom was heard to say a pox, or God rot her, can she walk hither? These words do so mad me that I could find in my heart to give him or my Lady notice of them."

This whole passage is confusing; can anyone figure out what exactly enrages our diarist?

cum salis grano   Link to this

tongue in cheek:
London cauldron, a common sense approach to allow for shrinkage [lost] due to pieces falling off the shovel as they leave the hold, then more disappearing off the back of the wagon before delivery.

Mary   Link to this

Tentative analysis.

Two separate but connected actions annoy and offend Sam. Both concern propriety.

Firstly, Pen's evident exasperation at having to send the coach back for his wife. It's 'letting the side down' to allow his displeasure (i.e. Pen's) to be observed, not least to be observed by the coachman because that leads, in turn to...

.... the gross impertinence of the coachman uttering such blasphemous words about his employer's wife. Whatever a servant may think about this master or mistress, it is intolerable that he should utter such sentiments in the hearing of others.

arby   Link to this

So... Did he mention it to Penn and Lady Penn, or not? I'm befused.

Mary   Link to this

Did he mention it?

No, I don't think so - at least, not yet. The clue is in the "could" not "did".

arby   Link to this

Right you are, thanks.

Phoenix   Link to this

Chaldron is a dry measure with Newcastle at 32 bushels and London at 36. What a chaldron actually weighed depended on whether one was selling or buying, that is whether you shipped from Newcastle or bought in London. Taxes were levied on volume and coal was sold by volume.

language hat   Link to this

Thanks, Mary, that makes perfect sense.

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