Friday 15 March 1666/67

Up, and pleased at Tom’s teaching of Barker something to sing a 3rd part to a song, which will please mightily. So I to the office all the morning, and at noon to the ‘Change, where I do hear that letters this day come to Court do tell us that we are likely not to agree, the Dutch demanding high terms, and the King of France the like, in a most braving manner. The merchants do give themselves over for lost, no man knowing what to do, whether to sell or buy, not knowing whether peace or war to expect, and I am told that could that be now known a man might get 20,000l. in a week’s time by buying up of goods in case there should be war. Thence home and dined well, and then with my wife, set her at Unthanke’s and I to Sir G. Carteret, where talked with the ladies a while, and my Lady Carteret talks nothing but sorrow and afflictions coming on us, and indeed I do fear the same. So away and met Dr. Fuller, Bishop of Limricke, and walked an hour with him in the Court talking of newes only, and he do think that matters will be bad with us. Then to Westminster Hall, and there spent an hour or two walking up and down, thinking ‘para avoir’ got out Doll Lane, ‘sed je ne’ could do it, having no opportunity ‘de hazer le, ainsi lost the tota’ afternoon, and so away and called my wife and home, where a little at the office, and then home to my closet to enter my journalls, and so to supper and to bed. This noon come little Mis. Tooker, who is grown a little woman; ego had opportunity ‘para baiser her … This morning I was called up by Sir John Winter, poor man! come in his sedan from the other end of the town, before I was up, and merely about the King’s business, which is a worthy thing of him, and I believe him to be a worthy good man, and I will do him the right to tell the Duke of it, who did speak well of him the other day. It was about helping the King in the business of bringing down his timber to the sea-side, in the Forest of Deane.

24 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“…. This noon came little Mis Tooker, who is grown a little woman; ego had l’opportunity para besar her and tocar la abaxo con my hand. She is pretty still, but had no mind to be vido, being not habilado as ella would be. My wife did tell me the other day that she heard she had had the gran pecho, but I hope no such thing. I sum certain that I should have been glad para aver tempo and lugar to have hecho algo con her. ….”

http://www.pepys.info/bits5.html

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...Tom’s teaching of Barker something to sing a 3rd part to a song...."

Was impromptu multipart-singing not as common then?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

SP on "little Mis Tooker" -

"I had the opportunity to kiss her and touch her below with my hand. She is pretty still, but had no mind to be seen, being not dressed as she would be. My wife did tell me the other day that she heard she had had the large breast, but I hope no such thing. I am certain that I should have been glad to have time and place to have done something with her..."

I don't understand the part about the "large breast." Presumably Miss Tooker is growing breasts by now. Why would Sam hope otherwise? He does like touching breasts, as we know. Or have I misunderstood the phrase?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...pleased at Tom’s teaching of Barker something to sing a 3rd part to a song, which will please mightily..."

"Tommy?"

"Bought 'er." grin.

"No... Mr. P. didn'."

"Did. Hook, line, and all."

"What did you tell 'im we was doin'?"

"I was...Ahem...Teaching Miss Barker the 3rd part of a song."

"What?"

"And you'd best learn one, as he'll be expectin' it."

"But 'e come right in on us?"

"'spect Mr. P. had his mind on his own affairs." grin.

"Tom!!" Call.

"Yes, Mrs. Pepys."

"Mr. Pepys says you're teaching Barker a song and I should learn it as well!"

"Right, mum."

"What's the song?"

"It's French, mum... I learnt of Mr. P!"

"Really?" Bess appears at door. "And what pray tell's the name?"

"..., mum."

"Tommy!" Barker in alarm.

"Rea...lly." Bess grins. "I believe I have heard that one."

cum salis grano   Link to this

tocar la abaxo con my hand.

via the Arogon leads to "down" like in eider down, in latin that be saying pappus, she be becoming a young women.
thus I be thinking, he [Samuell] be exploring the chest area.

David Goldfarb   Link to this

I guess that "pecho" here means "pox" -- "gran pecho", great pox == syphilis. (As opposed to "small pox" which was smallpox.)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...the Dutch demanding high terms, and the King of France the like, in a most braving manner. The merchants do give themselves over for lost, no man knowing what to do, whether to sell or buy, not knowing whether peace or war to expect, and I am told that could that be now known a man might get 20,000l. in a week’s time by buying up of goods in case there should be war."

I'd bank on there being war.

"Stupid English...We thumb our noses at you!"

"Worst of it is, Pepys..." Batten sighs. "Those are our seamen."

***

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...my Lady Carteret talks nothing but sorrow and afflictions coming on us, and indeed I do fear the same."

Guys, you just survived the Great Plague and the Great Fire. I doubt Louis and his erstwhile allies can do much more.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...ainsi lost the tota’ afternoon, and so away and called my wife and home, where a little at the office, and then home to my closet to enter my journalls, and so to supper and to bed."

Heaven...

"You know you could have just had sex with me that afternoon." Bess notes.

"Why?" Sam shrugs.

***

"So...Let me get this straight. Mr. Pepys accidently put his head through that wall?" St. Peter eyes the rather unfortunate Pepys as several assistants attempt to extract him from said wall.

"Oh, yes..." Sam calls faintly. Peter frowning at Bess.

"Tis a beautiful lie..." Bess notes fondly, shrugging.

"You two do understand that this is supposed to be Heaven?"

"Wherever she is..." faint call from wall.

Bess eyes Peter.

"Accident..." Peter shakes head, writing.

"You know I can only do this sort of thing three times." he eyes Bess.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Heaven...

"But sir..." assistant addresses Peter. "Why are we letting this Pepys off?"

"Wife vouched, remanded to her care."

"Yes, but what about...The little Tooker girl."

"Purgatory took care of that. She's content with his wife's probation."

"Really?"

"Several rather large and hideous types had two hundred years opportunity to 'do something' with him."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"This morning I was called up by Sir John Winter....about helping the King in the business of bringing down his timber to the sea-side, in the Forest of Deane."

That would surely involve hauling the timber to the nearby River Severn http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Severn and so down to Bristol, where, Pepys told us, was "a ship built...the last year, of fifty guns and upwards, and a most excellent good ship." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/02/06/

That would do the King good.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"That would surely involve hauling the timber to the nearby River Severn "

Too bad Sir John Winter's project was not carried out: it would have prevented The Dean Forest Riots, a great civil disturbance 164 year on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest_of_Dean#The...

Mary   Link to this

little Miss Tooker was rumoured on February 24th to have the clap. Rumour has now incresed the severity of her infection to the great pox. Just as well that Sam didn't have time and place to do something with her; he has quite enough genito-urinary problems already, I should have thought.

cape henry   Link to this

"...and then home to my closet to enter my journalls..."
These writings in hindsight, even if aided with contemporaneous notes, remain breathtaking in their power to conjure all that they do for us.He manages to enliven the smallest details of his life - though never enough, to be sure - to the grandest events.Think back to the long,particularized, recollection of the complex political conversation with Hugh Cholmley on the 11th. I assume it is being documented today, so the succinctness and detail are even more remarkable.I realize that this isn't a new revelation to any regular readers, but I bring it up here just to give us pause to think about it again.

arby   Link to this

Thanks for the forest riots link, Terry.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Thanks to David Goldfarb and Mary for clarifying that pecho=pox. That makes a lot more sense. Now I'm wondering how it came to mean 'breast' in modern Spanish.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"gran pecho"
although it seems logical and plausible I don't see any evidence of it meaning syphilis in spanish.

cum salis grano   Link to this

I hate to disagree: pecho is a popular Spanish word for n. bosom, breast, chest
great Pox was medically known as syphilis, could not find
any other slang word connection or popular cover word.
Need some good reference/citation for the Pox connection.

Samuell knew of the dangers of pox, but be unaware of it showing up elsewhere.
So in my ignorance I doth think Samuell was investigating the chest.

Mary   Link to this

The problem is that Pepys says that he hopes no such thing, which implies that the 'problem' is something that he is not capable of discerning for himself, so 'pecho = breast' doesn't make a lot of sense here.

Perhaps we should be looking for 17th century slang, or even a different spelling. Any suggestions?

Mary   Link to this

I've just looked at Tomalin's biography. She (page 423 note 51) goes with the syphilis version.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Poor kid...What a miserable life.

language hat   Link to this

Yeah, it has to mean "pox" here. It does no good to put any weight on Sam's spellings; he's completely impressionistic with his foreignisms. And "breast" makes no sense in context.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Unless "great breast" meant swelling in breast - breast cancer?

Gaston FUGIER   Link to this

Memory has special tricks, such as taking one word for another which has the same initial, (e.g; sous la chaise/sur la chaise on January 16, 1664) S.P. may have used Pecho instead of Panza, meaning she had had a big belly, i.e. she had been pregnant

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