Wednesday 20 February 1666/67

Up, with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen by coach to White Hall, by the way observing Sir W. Pen’s carrying a favour to Sir W. Coventry, for his daughter’s wedding, and saying that there was others for us, when we will fetch them, which vexed me, and I am resolved not to wear it when he orders me one. His wedding hath been so poorly kept, that I am ashamed of it; for a fellow that makes such a flutter as he do. When we come to the Duke of York here, I heard discourse how Harris of his play-house is sick, and everybody commends him, and, above all things, for acting the Cardinall. Here they talk also how the King’s viallin, —[violin]— Bannister, is mad that the King hath a Frenchman come to be chief of some part of the King’s musique, at which the Duke of York made great mirth. Then withdrew to his closett, all our business, lack of money and prospect of the effects of it, such as made Sir W. Coventry say publickly before us all, that he do heartily wish that his Royal Highness had nothing to do in the Navy, whatever become of him; so much dishonour, he says, is likely to fall under the management of it. The Duke of York was angry, as much as he could be, or ever I saw him, with Sir G. Carteret, for not paying the masters of some ships on Monday last, according to his promise, and I do think Sir G. Carteret will make himself unhappy by not taking some course either to borrow more money or wholly lay aside his pretence to the charge of raising money, when he hath nothing to do to trouble himself with. Thence to the Exchequer, and there find the people in readiness to dispatch my tallies to-day, though Ash Wednesday. So I back by coach to London to Sir Robt. Viner’s and there got 100l., and come away with it and pay my fees round, and so away with the ‘Chequer men to the Leg in King Street, and there had wine for them; and here was one in company with them, that was the man that got the vessel to carry over the King from Bredhemson, who hath a pension of 200 per annum, but ill paid, and the man is looking after getting of a prizeship to live by; but the trouble is, that this poor man, who hath received no part of his money these four years, and is ready to starve almost, must yet pay to the Poll Bill for this pension. He told me several particulars of the King’s coming thither, which was mighty pleasant, and shews how mean a thing a king is, how subject to fall, and how like other men he is in his afflictions. Thence with my tallies home, and a little dinner, and then with my wife by coach to Lincoln’s Inn Fields, sent her to her brother’s, and I with Lord Bellasses to the Lord Chancellor’s. Lord Bellasses tells me how the King of France hath caused the stop to be made to our proposition of treating in The Hague; that he being greater than they, we may better come and treat at Paris: so that God knows what will become of the peace! He tells me, too, as a grand secret, that he do believe the peace offensive and defensive between Spayne and us is quite finished, but must not be known, to prevent the King of France’s present falling upon Flanders. He do believe the Duke of York will be made General of the Spanish armies there, and Governor of Flanders, if the French should come against it, and we assist the Spaniard: that we have done the Spaniard abundance of mischief in the West Indys, by our privateers at Jamaica, which they lament mightily, and I am sorry for it to have it done at this time. By and by, come to my Lord Chancellor, who heard mighty quietly my complaints for lack of money, and spoke mighty kind to me, but little hopes of help therein, only his good word. He do prettily cry upon Povy’s account with sometimes seeming friendship and pity, and this day quite the contrary. He do confess our streights here and every where else arise from our outspending our revenue. I mean that the King do do so. Thence away, took up my wife; who tells me her brother hath laid out much money upon himself and wife for clothes, which I am sorry to hear, it requiring great expense. So home and to the office a while, and then home to supper, where Mrs. Turner come to us, and sat and talked. Poor woman, I pity her, but she is very cunning. She concurs with me in the falseness of Sir W. Pen’s friendship, and she tells pretty storms of my Lord Bruncker since he come to our end of the town, of people’s applications to Mrs. Williams. So, she gone, I back to my accounts of Tangier, which I am settling, having my new tallies from the Exchequer this day, and having set all right as I could wish, then to bed.

11 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"[ Sir W. Pen’s ] wedding hath been so poorly kept, that I am ashamed of it; for a fellow that makes such a flutter as he do."

to make a flutter = to make an ostentatious fuss (L&M Large Glossary)

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...not paying the masters of some ships on Monday last, according to his promise, ..."
Tis why there be Privateers, offer a little incentive.
Government when low in taxable income to allow private enterprise to do the dirty work.

"twas" a popular occupation in the 17C for out of work talented tars that were up seeking a fortune. Others were called Pirates when they did not have a piece of marked document, that legalised the hijacking ships of value.

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...that we have done the Spaniard abundance of mischief in the West Indys, by our privateers at Jamaica, which they lament mightily, and I am sorry for it to have it done at this time.
..."
[< PRIVATE adj.1 + -EER suffix1, probably after VOLUNTEER n.
With sense 1a compare slightly later private man of war n. at PRIVATE adj.1, adv., and n. Special uses 2.]
privateers

1. a. An armed vessel owned and crewed by private individuals, and holding a government commission known as a letter of marque (see letter of marque n. at MARQUE n.1 2) authorizing the capture of merchant shipping belonging to an enemy nation. Now hist.
?1641 in Catal. Prints: Polit. & Personal Satires (Brit. Mus.) (1870) I. 216 Love and Loyalty; or a Letter from a Young-Man on Board an English Privateer. 1667 S. PEPYS Diary 20 Feb. (1974) VIII. 75 We have done the Spanyard abundance of mischief..by our privateers at Jamaica. 1687 B. RANDOLPH Present State Archipelago 46 There are several other ports and creeks, which are often haunted by the privateers.

b. The commander or a member of the crew of a privateer. Now hist.
Quot. 1664 may belong at sense 1a.
1664 COL. T. LYNCH in Cal. State Papers, Colon. (1880) 211 The calling in of the privateers will be but a remote and hazardous expedient... What compliance can be expected from men..that have no other element but the sea, or trade but privateering.

1666 in H. Paton Rep. Laing MSS (1914) I. 348 Hamiltoun will sudenly out and severall other privateres that are prepareing themselves.

a1674 EARL OF CLARENDON Life (1842) 1127/2 It was resolved that all possible encouragement should be given to
[< PRIVATEER n. + -ING suffix1. In later use probably partly also < PRIVATEER v. + -ING suffix1. Compare later PRIVATEERING adj.]

1. The occupation or practice of a privateer. Now hist.
1664 COL. T. LYNCH in Cal. State Papers, Colon. (1880) 211 What compliance can be expected from men..that have no other element but the sea, or trade but privateering.
1687 Royal Proclam. 18 Sept. in London Gaz. No. 2279/3, His Majesty will..grant unto such Pirat or Pirats, Privateer or Privateers, a full Pardon for all Piracies or Robberies.

2. A volunteer or freelance soldier. Obs.
1676 I. MATHER Hist. King Philip's War (1862) 58 Hearing many profane oaths among some of our Souldiers (namely those Privateers, who were also Volunteers).

1677 W. HUBBARD Narrative 18 Our Horsemen with the whole
body of the Privateers under Captain Moseley..ran violently down upon them.

1675 Cal. State Papers, Colon. (1893) 263 What is due to the Lord Admiral from the privateer captains and their companies that sail under his commission.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"she tells pretty storms"

mis-scan for "stories"?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Paul, L&M think Pepys wrote "stories" -- keen read.

JWB   Link to this

"Lord Bellasses tells me how the King of France hath caused the stop to be made to our proposition of treating in The Hague"

Voltaire tells us: "" Louis faw with pleafure thefe two maritime powers put to fea everyyear againft each other fleets of more than one hundred hips of war and mutually deftroying one another by the moft obftinate battles that ever were heard of and of which the only confequence was the weakening of both parties." Chapt 7, "The Age of Louis XIV".

JWB   Link to this

“she tells pretty storms”

objet trouvé

cum salis grano   Link to this

Bredhemson,Samuel has the only reference to this spelling.
A case of spelling by accent?
?Broadhampton?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Bredhemson for Brighton

"If some proper names are not spelt with a slavish uniformity, I have only followed the fashion of the time. i
i For Brighthelmstone I have found Bredhemson, Brightsemson,Broadhemson, and Brathhampston."

Charles Thomas-Stanford. Sussex in the great Civil War and the interregnum, 1642-1660. London, 1910. http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/charles-t...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...that we have done the Spaniard abundance of mischief in the West Indys, by our privateers at Jamaica, which they lament mightily, and I am sorry for it to have it done at this time."

"And remember, Captain...Should any of your force be caught or killed...The Clerk of the Acts will disavow any knowledge of your actions."

***
"Your Majesty...My noble master, the King and Emperor of Espaine would be only too happy to give his ascent to this most perfect peace and harmony between England and his vast realm. And thereby be enabled to assist England in her desperate struggle with her foes. However...He has been most troubled by the recent reports that your English privateers have been operating in his most sacred realm of the Caribbean Islands, spreading death and destruction...Looting and pillaging his most beloved subjects. Even worse, he has learned that some of these bandits...Savage pirates...Are in the employ of some of your own officials. There is one ship in particular...The eh..." fingersnap to clerk... "Yes, the Flying Greyhound..."

Australian Susan   Link to this

Charles and Pensions

Charles paid many such pensions (or intended to) as the one described in the entry today. Famously, he paid pensions to those who helped him escape after the Battle of Worcester in 1651, including to the Penderel family and their descendents - this is still paid today. See http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/worcester.html

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