Monday 26 November 1666

Up, and to my chamber to do some business. Then to speak with several people, among others with Mrs. Burroughs, whom I appointed to meet me at the New Exchange in the afternoon. I by water to Westminster, and there to enquire after my tallies, which I shall get this week. Thence to the Swan, having sent for some burnt claret, and there by and by comes Doll Lane, and she and I sat and drank and talked a great while, among other things about her sister’s being brought to bed, and I to be godfather to the girle. I did tumble Doll, and do almost what I would with her, and so parted, and I took coach, and to the New Exchange, buying a neat’s tongue by the way, thinking to eat it out of town, but there I find Burroughs in company of an old woman, an aunt of hers, whom she could not leave for half an hour. So after buying a few baubles to while away time, I down to Westminster, and there into the House of Parliament, where, at a great Committee, I did hear, as long as I would, the great case against my Lord Mordaunt, for some arbitrary proceedings of his against one Taylor, whom he imprisoned, and did all the violence to imaginable, only to get him to give way to his abusing his daughter. Here was Mr. Sawyer, my old chamber-fellow, a counsel against my Lord; and I am glad to see him in so good play. Here I met, before the committee sat, with my cozen Roger Pepys, the first time I have spoke with him this parliament. He hath promised to come, and bring Madam Turner with him, who is come to towne to see the City, but hath lost all her goods of all kinds in Salisbury Court, Sir William Turner having not endeavoured, in her absence, to save one penny, to dine with me on Friday next, of which I am glad. Roger bids me to help him to some good rich widow; for he is resolved to go, and retire wholly, into the country; for, he says, he is confident we shall be all ruined very speedily, by what he sees in the State, and I am much in his mind. Having staid as long as I thought fit for meeting of Burroughs, I away and to the ‘Change again, but there I do not find her now, I having staid too long at the House, and therefore very hungry, having eat nothing to-day. Home, and there to eat presently, and then to the office a little, and to Sir W. Batten, where Sir J. Minnes and Captain Cocke was; but no newes from the North at all to-day; and the newes-book makes the business nothing, but that they are all dispersed. I pray God it may prove so. So home, and, after a little, to my chamber to bed.

11 Annotations

CGS   Link to this

Poll Bill.

A Bill for raising Part of the One million Eight hundred thousand Pounds Supply for his Majesty by a Poll . . . was read the Second time.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House: And that the Committee be impowered to appoint some Persons to inspect the Heads of the Bill; and to bring in an Estimate, What Sum of Money may be raised on the Bill.

CGS   Link to this

above be the House of commons

This be for and by the Privilege ones, H of HeLL
for us illiterate ones, forbid that we be unable to swear on the Douai.
Ld. Hatton's Servant's Arrest.

Upon Oath made at the Bar of this House, "That Samuell Gardiner, One of the Serjeants at Mace to the Sheriffs of London and Midd. did not only arrest William Jones, domestic Servant and Steward to the Lord Hatton, a Peer of this Realm, sitting the Parliament, contrary to the Privilege of Parliament, notwithstanding that a Protection signed and sealed by the Lord Hatton was shewed to the said Samuell Gardiner; but he the said Samuell Gardiner also said, that he cared not for the Lord Hatton, nor for any Lord in England; and that he would arrest any Lord, if the Party employing him would pay him well."
Gardiner committed to The Fleet.

It is thereupon ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Samuell Gardiner shall stand committed to the Custody of the Warden of The Fleete, during the Pleasure of this House: And this shall be a sufficient Warrant on that Behalf.
Salisbury, alias Clayton, committed to The Fleet.

Upon Oath made at the Bar of this House, "That William Salisbury, alias Clayton, was present, and assisting unto Samuell Gardiner, One of the Serjeants at Mace to the Sheriffs of London and Midd. at the arresting of William Jones, domestic Servant and Steward to the Lord Hatton, a Peer of this Realm (sitting the Parliament), contrary to the Privilege of Parliament; and notwithstanding that a Protection signed and sealed by the Lord Hatton was shewed to the said William Salisbury, alias Clayton, he, together with the said Samuell Gardiner, arrested and detained the said William Jones in Custody:"

It is therefore ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said William Salisbury, alias Clayton, shall stand committed to the Custody of the Warden of The Fleete, during the Pleasure of this House: And this shall be a sufficient Warrant on that Behalf.
Winn to be attached.

Upon Complaint made to this House, "That William Jones, domestic Servant and Steward to the Lord Hatton, a Peer of this Realm, was arrested (sitting the Parliament), contrary to the Privilege of Parliament, at the Suit, and by the Appointment, of Georg Wynne:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Serjeant at Arms attending this House, or his Deputy, shall forthwith attach the Body of the said George Wynne, and bring him in safe Custody to the Bar of this House, to answer his said Offence: And for so doing, this shall be a sufficient Warrant.

cape henry   Link to this

"...having sent for some burnt claret." It seems appropriate on this feast day in the U.S. to remark that while we can read what was written during Pepys era, and see what was painted, watch the plays, study the clothing, hear the music played on period instruments, visit the buildings, and so on, we can not really eat the food or drink the wine of that time. What, for instance, might burnt claret have been like? -Boiled? Or the Parmesan cheese that Pepys buried during the fire? -Similar to what we know today? Without a doubt the mysteries in these entries are part of their appeal, but who wouldn't want to have at least a whiff of one of the real venison pasties?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

A Fly About A Glasse Of Burnt Claret.

I.
Forbear this liquid fire, Fly,
It is more fatal then the dry,
That singly, but embracing, wounds;
And this at once both burns and drowns.

II.
The salamander, that in heat
And flames doth cool his monstrous sweat,
Whose fan a glowing cake is said,
Of this red furnace is afraid.
[...]

IX.
Noble, and brave! now thou dost know
The false prepared decks below,
Dost thou the fatal liquor sup,
One drop, alas! thy barque blowes up.

X.
What airy country hast to save,
Whose plagues thou'lt bury in thy grave?
For even now thou seem'st to us
On this gulphs brink a Curtius.
[...]

XII.
Yet, see! my glad auricular
Redeems thee (though dissolv'd) a star,
Flaggy thy wings, and scorch'd thy thighs,
Thou ly'st a double sacrifice.

XIII.
And now my warming, cooling breath
Shall a new life afford in death;
See! in the hospital of my hand
Already cur'd, thou fierce do'st stand.

XIV.
Burnt insect! dost thou reaspire
The moist-hot-glasse and liquid fire?
I see 'tis such a pleasing pain,
Thou would'st be scorch'd and drown'd again.

Richard Lovelace

http://www.poemhunter.com/best-poems/richard-lo...

CGS   Link to this


burnt wine, some say it started with the Dutch, a Dutch method of making brandy that became the household drink of the top men's hideaways {club]
Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine")
??

OED:

burnt, burned, ppl. a
5. Of wine, etc.: ‘Made hot’ (J.); see quot. 1876; the precise early sense is doubtful. (Now only dial.) burnt brandy: that from which part of the spirit has been removed by burning.
1583 ...
1661 PEPYS Diary 15 Jan., A cupp of burnt wine at the taverne.
....
1876 F. ROBINSON Whitby Gloss. Pref. 9 ‘Burnt wine from a silver flagon’ was handed..being a heated preparation of port wine with spices and sugar.

1880 Barman's Man. 55 Burnt brandy..one glass of Cognac and half a table-spoonful of white sugar, burnt in a saucer.

Ric Jerrom   Link to this

Burnt claret - almost certainly mulled - still enormously popular all over northern Europe (and N. America?) as a "winter warmer" and particularly ubiquitous as "gluhwein" (umlaut on the "u") at Christmas Markets in Germany and elsewhere. Arguments abound re.recipes, but oranges spiked with cloves, cinnamon, ginger and other spices and quantities of sugar are pretty general. The simpler warmed drinks of Sam's time were apparently often created by plunging red - hot -from - the - fire iron "salamanders" directly into the flagon: "Lambswool" - from Yorkshire and elsewhere was achieved by the same method with ale, spiced, then topped with (cooked) crab-apple foam. On cold days mulling is still a fine way to potentiate indifferent wine!

The "newes book makes the business nothing" what is the "newes book"? The "London Gazette" or somesuch? What news organs were regular and available to Sam and his contemporaries?

JWB   Link to this

Terry:
IX.
"Noble, and brave! now thou dost know
The false prepared decks below,
Dost thou the fatal liquor sup,
One drop, alas! thy barque blowes up."

Is it my post Thanksgiving trytophan infused brain or are you back on Lizzy Milet/Sir Popham?

Phoenix   Link to this

Cape Henry:

Venison pasties might be possible.

http://www.historicfood.com/Edward%20Kidders%20...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"burnt claret" ~ kin to hypocras?

http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/6902/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...I am glad to see him in so good play." Hmmn? Pleased to see his ole pal in such a major case or is this a rather hypocritical comment on the justice of the cause? I suppose we should be pleased Sam didn't take milord Mordaunt's side... "Can't see why Taylor should make such a fuss-Didn't Mordaunt offer enough?" Seriously, Taylor must have powerful friends as well as be a damned loving father to have endured such wrath. Though of course we're hardly over cases of the powerful feeling themselves entitled to abuse and rape the powerless in our own era.

Wonder how much it would cost Uncle Wight to put Sam in prison...?

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"I did tumble Doll"
Lawd hamercy!

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