Sunday 20 May 1666

(Lord’s day). With my wife to church in the morning. At noon dined mighty nobly, ourselves alone. After dinner my wife and Mercer by coach to Greenwich, to be gossip to Mrs. Daniel’s child. I out to Westminster, and straight to Mrs. Martin’s, and there did what I would with her, she staying at home all the day for me; and not being well pleased with her over free and loose company, I away to Westminster Abbey, and there fell in discourse with Mr. Blagrave, whom I find a sober politique man, that gets money and increase of places, and thence by coach home, and thence by water after I had discoursed awhile with Mr. Yeabsly, whom I met and took up in my coach with me, and who hath this day presented my Lord Ashly with 100l. to bespeak his friendship to him in his accounts now before us; and my Lord hath received it, and so I believe is as bad, as to bribes, as what the world says of him. Calling on all the Victualling ships to know what they had of their complements, and so to Deptford, to enquire after a little business there, and thence by water back again, all the way coming and going reading my Lord Bacon’s “Faber Fortunae,” which I can never read too often, and so back home, and there find my wife come home, much pleased with the reception she had there, and she was godmother, and did hold the child at the Font, and it is called John. So back again home, and after setting my papers in order and supping, to bed, desirous to rise betimes in the morning.

15 Annotations

Lawrence   Link to this

"straight to Mrs. Martin’s, and there did what I would with her, she staying at home all the day for me; and not being well pleased with her over free and loose company"
That's right Mr Pepys, you show and tell her how to be moral?

JWB   Link to this

"...which I can never read too often..."

Martin Luther, in his "Table Talk", advised reading a few good books again & again rather than many books just once.

cape henry   Link to this

"...and my Lord hath received it, and so I believe is as bad, as to bribes, as what the world says of him."
This may be one of the most unintentionally funny lines in the diary (if you discount the one mentioned above by L. of course).

Bryan M   Link to this

"to be gossip to Mrs. Daniel’s child"

From the Online Etymology Dictionary:
'gossip O.E. godsibb "godparent," from God + sibb "relative" (see sibling). Extended in M.E. to "any familiar acquaintance" (1362), especially to woman friends invited to attend a birth, later to "anyone engaging in familiar or idle talk" (1566). Sense extended 1811 to "trifling talk, groundless rumor." The verb meaning "to talk idly about the affairs of others" is from 1627.'

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...and not being well pleased with her over free and loose company, I away to Westminster Abbey, and there fell in discourse with Mr. Blagrave, whom I find a sober politique man, that gets money and increase of places..."

And darn that Diana Crisp for not being as good as she should be...And that Bagwell for letting you 'vanquer' her...And that Mercer for letting you feel her breasts. What is wrong with these women, eh Sam? Why can't they be sober and politique like Blagrave and get money and increase of place...And well, like you and Lady Castlemaine...

***
"...after I had discoursed awhile with Mr. Yeabsly, whom I met and took up in my coach with me, and who hath this day presented my Lord Ashly with 100l. to bespeak his friendship to him in his accounts now before us; and my Lord hath received it, and so I believe is as bad, as to bribes, as what the world says of him."

I know...For a Lord to sell himself for 100Ls. Shocking...When you yourself, an untitled commoner are becoming reluctant to sell for less than 400L.

Of course Lady Castlemaine holds out for 10,000+...But then you aren't quite willing to do what she does, eh Sam? Sam?

***

cgs   Link to this

influence peddler??

".... Mr. Yeabsly,...

...who hath this day presented my Lord Ashly with 100l. to bespeak his friendship to him in his accounts now before us; and my Lord hath received it, and so I believe is as bad, as to bribes, as what the world says of him...."

bribe n
interesting origins.
another entree for SP
1. A thing stolen or robbed; theft, robbery; spoil, plunder. Obs. (The Chaucer quotation is doubtful: if the n. is right, it might perh. have the sense of ‘an alms’, as in OF.)
c1386 CHAUCER Friar's T.

2. ‘A reward given to pervert the judgment or corrupt the conduct’ (J.). a. The earlier sense probably regarded it as a consideration extorted, exacted, or taken by an official, a judge, etc.; i.e. as the act of the receiver: cf. BRIBER.
1535..
1611 BIBLE 1 Sam. viii. 3 His sonnes..tooke bribes, and peruerted iudgement.
..
b. But it is now applied to a consideration voluntarily offered to corrupt a person and induce him to act in the interest of the giver, e.g. a consideration given to a voter to procure his vote.
1555 ...

1667 PEPYS Diary (1879) IV. 340 His rise hath been his giving of large bribes.

3. (perh.) Rascally or execrable behaviour; clamour. Cf. BRIBER 1b, quot. a1400. Obs.
a1560..
4. Comb., as bribe-broker, -brokerage, -monger; bribe-free, -worthy adjs.; bribe-service, a service done for a bribe. Also BRIBE-TAKER, -TAKING.

Bribe v

1. trans. To take dishonestly; to purloin; to steal, rob; to obtain by abuse of trust, or by extortion; to extort. Obs.
c1386 CHAUCER Cook's T...

1. trans. To take dishonestly; to purloin; to steal, rob; to obtain by abuse of trust, or by extortion; to extort. Obs.
c1386 CHAUCER Cook's T..

2. To influence corruptly, by a reward or consideration, the action of (a person); to pervert the judgement or corrupt the conduct by a gift. Const. with a consideration, to an action, to do a thing.
1528..
3. trans. To purchase or obtain by bribery. arch.
1718

4. fig. To gain over by some influence.
1595 SHAKES. John II. i.

briber
1. A vagabond, strolling vagrant; = F. bribeur, It. and Sp. bribon. Obs. (The last quot. belongs doubtfully here.)
1483

b. Hence: Scoundrel, wretch, rascal. (Cf. a similar use of beggar, vagabond, thief.) Obs.
1387 ..
b. Hence: Scoundrel, wretch, rascal. (Cf. a similar use of beggar, vagabond, thief.) Obs.
1387 ..
3. A judge or other official who levies ‘blackmail’ upon those to whom he should administer justice; one who exacts or accepts bribes; a bribee. Cf. BRIBE-TAKER. Obs.
1520 WHITTINTON Vulg. (1527)

4. One who offers or gives a bribe.
1583..

5. A thing that bribes, a price paid. Obs.
1607

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"For a Lord to sell himself for 100Ls. Shocking…When you yourself, an untitled commoner are becoming reluctant to sell for less than 400L."

Indeed. L&M agree: "The story of the bribe is probably untrue....Ahley ...was not corrupt and in any case was too rich to be corrupted by the gift of £100. Yeabsley had paid Pepys £300 p.a. since getting the contract...." Yeabsley may have known Pepys played a bit fast and loose with tales about ££, so why shouldn't he?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... all the way coming and going reading my Lord Bacon’s “Faber Fortunae,” which I can never read too often, ... "

Thought for the day ...

" ... And certainly there be not two more fortunate properties, than to have a little of the fool, and not too much of the honest. ..." Bacon, 'Of fortune ...' (1601)
http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/ba...

Firenze   Link to this

Ah, the 17th century gentleman's Sunday: bit of church-going, bit of adultery, bit of hypocrisy, read a good book.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"Bribes" is another of those words that changes with the user. You take a bribe, I accept commision.
Or, in the case of our UK MP's, I am caught robbing the till, they are claiming expenses.

Albatross   Link to this

Here in the States, we call it "lobbying."

Mary   Link to this

"at noon dined mighty nobly"
but, presumably, not on large quantities of lobster.

Paul Dyson   Link to this

"and not being well pleased with her over free and loose company"

What is Sam not pleased about? Does he mean she is "over-free" (i.e. too free) with him? Surely that's why he visits her! And this visit was evidently pre-arranged to fit in with Bess' trip to Greenwich. Or does "over" mean "about" and he is jealous that she also has other gentleman callers and is not his exclusively (not counting Mr Martin of course)? It does seem another case of double standards with a strong touch of snobbery thrown in.

cgs   Link to this

“over-free”
all the Toms may participate

language hat   Link to this

Yeah, I think he wants to be the only vice in her life.

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