5 Annotations

TerryF   Link to this

Fr. Baconi, Sermones fideles, Accedunt Faber fortunae, Colores boni et mali, &c., Ex officina Elzeviriana: Amstelodami, 1662. [online i.a. at]
http://www.intratext.com/X/LAT0679.HTM

cumgranosalis   Link to this

an anglosized text be 'ere
http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/ba...

cumgranosalis   Link to this

There appears to be no documentation to a book or article by that name only a ref to the words being used in the writings by Bacon Sir Francis.
A note in the etext : be as follows:

20th. Up and to my office, and then walked to Woolwich, reading Bacon's "Faber fortunae," [Pepys may here refer either to Essay XLI. (of Fortune) or to a chapter' in the "Advancement of Learning." The sentence, "Faber quisque fortunae propria," said to be by Appius Claudian, is quoted more than once in the "De Augmentis Scientiarum," lib. viii., cap. 2.]
http://gutenberg.com/eBooks/PGCC/sp27g10.htm
Then Isis Group discussed it: It is on file for those that have academic accreditation:
R. C. COCHRANE: BACON, PEPYS, AND THE "FABER FORTUNAE" Notes and Queries 1956 3: 511-514; doi:10.1093/nq/3.12.511 [PDF] [Request Permissions] ...
nq.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol3/issue12/index.dtl

Bacon & Machiavelli
also discussed in the sanctuary of UCLA
http://eee.uci.edu/clients/bjbecker/PlaguesandP...

Bill   Link to this

Pepys may here refer either to Essay XLI. (of Fortune) or to a chapter in the "Advancement of Learning." The sentence, "Faber quisque fortunae propria," said to be by Appius Claudian, is quoted more than once in the "De Augmentis Scientiarum," lib. viii., cap. 2.
---Wheatley, 1904.

Bill   Link to this

Faber fortunae suae. Lat.—"The architect, founder, of his own fortune." N.B. The original expression, which occurs in Sallust [the distinguished Roman historian], is, "Suae quisque fortunae faber," "Every one is [more or less] the maker of his own fortune.
---Ancient and Modern Familiar Quotations from the Greek, Latin, and Modern Language. 1892.

There are extant two letters addressed to Caesar: “Duae Epistolae de Republiea ordinanda," or “Two Letters commanded by the Republic,” which contain political counsel and advice, and are attributed, on doubtful authority, to the historian Sallust (Caius Sallustius Crispus). In the first of these letters occurs the following sentence: “But these things teach us the truth of what Appius says in his verses, that everyone is the architect of his own fortune” (Fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae). The reference is to Appius Claudius Caecus, who held the office of censor in B.C. 312. His poems have not survived him.
Bacon, in his essay, “Of Fortune,” refers approvingly to the saying of Appius: “It cannot be denied, but outward accidents conduce much to fortune; favor, opportunity, death of others, occasion fitting virtue: but chiefly, the mould of a man's fortune is in his own hands: Faber quisque fortunae suae.”
---The Literary Era. January, 1901.

Every man is the son of his own works.
---Don Quixote. Cervantes.

Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
---Julius Caesar. W. Shakespeare.

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References

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