Sunday 2 July 1665

(Sunday). Up, and all the morning dressing my closet at the office with my plates, very neatly, and a fine place now it is, and will be a pleasure to sit in, though I thank God I needed none before. At noon dined at home, and after dinner to my accounts and cast them up, and find that though I have spent above 90l. this month yet I have saved 17l., and am worth in all above 1450l., for which the Lord be praised! In the evening my Lady Pen and daughter come to see, and supped with us, then a messenger about business of the office from Sir G. Carteret at Chatham, and by word of mouth did send me word that the business between my Lord and him is fully agreed on,1 and is mightily liked of by the King and the Duke of Yorke, and that he sent me this word with great joy; they gone, we to bed. I hear this night that Sir J. Lawson was buried late last night at St. Dunstan’s by us, without any company at all, and that the condition of his family is but very poor, which I could be contented to be sorry for, though he never was the man that ever obliged me by word or deed.

  1. The arrangements for the marriage of Lady Jemimah Montagu to Philip Carteret were soon settled, for the wedding took place on July 31st

20 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

“Lawson was buried late last night at St. Dunstan’s by us, without any company at all, and that the condition of his family is but very poor, which I could be contented to be sorry for, though he never was the man that ever obliged me by word or deed.”

In his Memorials to Sir William Penn by his grandson Granville Penn (p335)...

This says Campbell "was the end of Sir John Lawson, a man who owed all things to his merit; and who, after doing so many and great services to this nation, wants, for anything I can learn, a tomb."

We are indebted to Pepys' Diary for being able to rescue the generation he served from a part of this reproach; yet it is no small discredit to that generation, that great honour and more public attention were not shown to his remains, in the last tribute of feeling that they could pay to his glorious memory.

For Clarendon's view see p336

"...for he was a very generous man, and lived in his house decently and plentifully, and had never any the least suit or pretence for money."

http://books.google.com/books?id=BUg2AAAAMAAJ&p...

Pedro   Link to this

And Sandwich...

"…This afternoon, hearing my Wife ill at Groombridge, taking the waters of Tunbridge, I went thither, and returned to Chatham next morning, where I found Sir George Carteret and Sir William Coventry."

(Journal of Edward Montagu edited by Anderson)

Sandwich's journey will have interesting consequences.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"dressing my closet at the office with my plates"

Cp. Monday 29 May 1665
"To my office, where I stood by and saw Symson the joyner do several things, little jobbs, to the rendering of my closet handsome and the setting up of some neat plates that Burston has for my money made me,...." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/05/29/

There L&M also reference a plate of Deptford Yard paid for by the navy.

Eric Walla   Link to this

So the marriage is set. It seems we've heard a bit of matchmaking (at least pondering) over the past few months. Just wondering: could the success of this match have been a result of Lord Sandwich's stock rising from the recent battle? Or would the two families have been considered on an even level in society before this point and the timing was simply coincidental?

jeannine   Link to this

"Could the success of this match have been a result of Lord Sandwich’s stock rising from the recent battle? Or would the two families have been considered on an even level in society before this point and the timing was simply coincidental?"

Both of these men were well liked by the King and by Clarendon. Carteret had a long history of steadfastly supporting Charles in his exile and Sandwich returned him home, so they are in the same 'circle' so to speak regarding their standing, although neither man ventured into the 'libertine buddy' status and were rather disassociated with that aspect of the King & Court.

Both Carteret and Sandwich ‘earned’ their stripes through their service to the King so they were a good fit in that respect. Perhaps neither man was part of the ‘hip’ crowd around the court but they were more on the ‘protected’ side, so it was a good match that way.

Plus, they could both get together and talk about that little twit Sam, and as we know those types of conversations could keep them (and perhaps all of us) bound together for life!

dirk   Link to this

From the Carte Papers - Bodleian Library

Instructions by James, Duke of York, Lord High Admiral, for Sir William Penn
Written from: On board the Royal Charles
Date: 2 July 1665

The Lord Admiral Directs him to sail with the Squadron under his Command to Southwold Bay and thence towards the Texel, - not shewing his fleet to the shore, - plying or anchoring near the E. end of the Dogger-Bank, and making such attempt of service, "Either upon De Ruyter or the Dutch East-India Fleet (which are also suddenly expected)" as may be practicable.

dirk   Link to this

Even the Rev. Josselin remembers Lawson...

"plague increased to 267. bill. 684: my son have leave to continue in the country, god in mercy preserve us, and heal the city. medicaments used. but no public call to repentance(,) the king goes to Wilton by Salisberry. the old Queen gone for France. Lawson our brave seaman dead of his wound, the season very moist, lord sent not all in anger. god good to me in the word the lord accept me and be gracious to me"

dirk   Link to this

On 29 Jan 1660 Sam wrote in his diary: "spent the afternoon in casting up my accounts, and do find myself to be worth 40£."

Today he finds himself "worth in all above 1450£."

That's times a factor 36.25 in five and a half years. I think that's what it means to be "upwardly mobile".

Pedro   Link to this

Dirk…Instructions by James, Duke of York, Lord High Admiral, for Sir William Penn
Written from: On board the Royal Charles

Date: 2 July 1665.

The timing of this letter is interesting. The King has shown faith in Sandwich by promoting him to Admiral of the Fleet, but as we know there is no love lost between the Duke and Sandwich.

Sandwich has just travelled to see his sick wife leaving Penn in charge, and over the coming days we will no doubt hear of the repercussions.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Sam...Pepys..."

"What...Who be...?"

"We are the ghosts of the 90Ls you so foolishly wasted 50 of which would have happily pushed you over the 1500L mark...Ooooohhhh. Hugh Aubry is soooo disappointed in you, Samuel."

Aheee!... "But, it was mostly for Mother's outlay..."

"Please...That was barely 20Ls including the little sweeteners for Bess' good behavior toward Mum. And...?"

"...Well, my new suits did cost a trifle..."

"...Mucho...Peeeepss..."

"Uh, that's Pepys...P-e-p..."

Ahhhhhhh!!!... "Remember thou are mortal, Mr. P-e-p-y-s, and holding a nepotic post in an insecure, increasingly unpopular regime. In short, old boy...Pile, pile. Seize the day, before ye Dutch and ye opposition do."

"You know in Latin that's..."

AAAAAHHHH!!!!! "Heed our advice or look to see mucho fewer of us in the future!"

"Good God! I will heed, spirits!!"

"Consult Chapter 28... 'Don't Lose It Once Ye Are Gettin' It'."

"Oh?...I thought that dealt with other matters. Like Chapter 35."

"And get ye mind out of ye Fleet Street gutters. Remember, Chapter 35 is strictly for after ye have made it...Hugh only included it when his publisher insisted it would clinch ye sales."

"Sold it for me..." Sam nods. "I shall amend, oh spirits."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"In the evening my Lady Pen and daughter come to see, and supped with us..."

Interesting that Sam never gives much of an opinion on Lady Penn, excepting that earlier note on her being "an old Dutchwoman". Judging by the infamous bed-throwing incident, she has a ribald sense of humor at least at certain times. It seems he's not attracted to her unless his sense of class propriety is firing decisively to quench other impulses but it's odd he doesn't resort to the usual anti-Penn sneering. Perhaps he likes her but hates to admit even to himself a liking for anyone or -thing associated with Admiral Sir Will and so can't do better than to say nothing against her.

***
So, the fleet is Penn's for the moment, eh?

Make that Lord Protector Penn...

***

JWB   Link to this

"Sir J. Lawson was buried late last night at St. Dunstan’s by us, without any company at all..."

Public funerals had been banned. I can't give citation though have the Mootes' book before me- the index does not match the text (John Hopkins University Press).

Nix   Link to this

Lady Penn -- from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography article on Sir William:

On 6 January 1644 he married Margaret (d. 1682), daughter of Hans Jasper of Rotterdam and widow of Nicasius van der Schuren, a Dutchman living at Kilconry, co. Clare. Margaret had acquired an estate in Ireland from her first husband, to which Penn became entitled as her second, but it was far from lucrative, and the early years of their marriage were spent in a modest house on Tower Hill. Since the only account of these days is the later recollection of a spiteful neighbour, enthusiastically repeated by Pepys, it may be doubted if Penn was truly ‘pitiful’ or his wife ‘a dirty slattern’ (Pepys, Diary, 8.226–7).

A. Hamilton   Link to this

No mention of church this Sunday. I wonder if church services had been curtailed in London because of the plague, or whether Londoners had decided to avoid such gatherings. Note JWB's suggestion that funerals had been banned...

CGS   Link to this

Sunday service,so much extra work to give the required sermon for so little reward, and fear too, many left town along with the leaders of society [following the money trail], only the ragamuffin ex-preachers remained to help people in their hour of need like Bro. Thom. Vincent.

JWB   Link to this

A. Hamilton:

Sunday services were not banned. The King mandated Wednesday services too "...so long as it pleaseth God to visit the land with the pestilence." p103, Moote & Moote, "The Great Plague".

jeannine   Link to this

Date: 2 July 1665.

"The timing of this letter is interesting. The King has shown faith in Sandwich by promoting him to Admiral of the Fleet, but as we know there is no love lost between the Duke and Sandwich."

I think we need to look at a little 'behind the scenes here'. In the background (something Sam would not know) the Queen Mother Henrietta and Charles have realized that if James DOY was to be killed in battle then the 'spare' of the 'heir and a spare' would be gone. Although James and the other Naval commanders did exceptionally well at Lowestoft, his mother and brother are looking beyond the battleground at sea and keeping their eyes on the Kingdom. Anyway, James is now 'out' and Sandwich is now 'in'. There are more politics in the background that will emerge as people hustle and bustle for their 'rightful' roles. Remember that people like Rupert also may feel it's their rightful role to lead so they may be further volleying to come.......

Eric Walla   Link to this

Jeanine,

Oops, might be a little late to respond. I didn't outline part of my thoughts--it did seem that Sandwich's stock had gone downhill for the last couple years due to his debts, his mistress, and most of all to his lack of appearance at the Court. Perhaps this was simply Sam's perception, but it seems others noticed it strongly and brought it to Sam's attention. This led, as we all saw, to Sam writing that scolding letter that temporarily lost him favor. It is in this context that I wondered about Sandwich residing on the same social plane as Carteret.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Spoiler...

Events later this year may lead one to wonder if Charles and Jamie "mightily liked" the news of Sandwich's new alliance with Carteret as much as Sam reports. Sam sometimes seems and will seem, to me at least, almost willfully blind to my Lord Sandwich's weak and dangerous position...He is the last really powerful and respected ex-Cromwellian and yet has seriously isolated himself through his strenuous efforts to serve the restored monarchy. Yet however much the King may own to be in his debt and whatever baubles he may be thrown, he can never really hope to be in Charles' confidence even if the Stuart boys were more (or less) than human and could ever truly forget his role in the war that ended in Dad's show trial and execution. For Sandwich to recover some of his lost reputation, win laurels over Jamie, and establish a strong, potentially political dynasty with another leading figure in the government can only look like a threat to the Stuart inner circle. Inevitably the regime must seek to clip Sandwich's wings.

Pedro   Link to this

“I think we need to look at a little behind the scenes here”

The King had decided that the Duke should not go to sea and therefore there was the question of who should command the Fleet, Sandwich or Prince Rupert. They had both served well and there was the sensitive issue of Cavalier versus Roundhead.

Neither the King nor the Duke liked Rupert, or in their private circle took him seriously, but to keep equilibrium the King decided to offer joint command. Sandwich, always accommodating, accepted, but Rupert for some reason refused.

(Summary from Ollard's biography of Sandwich)

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