Monday 6 March 1664/65

Up, and with Sir J. Minnes by coach, being a most lamentable cold day as any this year, to St. James’s, and there did our business with the Duke. Great preparations for his speedy return to sea. I saw him try on his buff coat and hatpiece covered with black velvet. It troubles me more to think of his venture, than of anything else in the whole warr. Thence home to dinner, where I saw Besse go away; she having of all wenches that ever lived with us received the greatest love and kindnesse and good clothes, besides wages, and gone away with the greatest ingratitude. I then abroad to look after my Hamaccoes, and so home, and there find our new chamber-mayde, Mary, come, which instead of handsome, as my wife spoke and still seems to reckon, is a very ordinary wench, I think, and therein was mightily disappointed. To my office, where busy late, and then home to supper and to bed, and was troubled all this night with a pain in my left testicle, that run up presently into my left kidney and there kept akeing all night. In great pain.

18 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

On this day Allin is on his way to Blighty and is near Cape Roca…

"About 2 o'clock we fired a gun, showed our lights and tryed with our main course and mizzen. A very hard gale of wind. About 8 o'clock we spied a ship to the leeward standing with his larboard tack aboard firing guns, a weft with his ancient and one upon his main topmast stay. Captain Clarke bore up first, I after him. Making it to be Captain Talbot (in a merchantman) we lay as near him as we durst, the sea being very deep, and we saw him bailing and pumping, the sea making a passage over him. At length we saw his longboat on his tackles and presently full of men and put off. We hauled our mainsail aback and lay for them and took them aboard, the men very much spent and much ado to get into the ship. They let the longboat drive being very leaky. They left a dozen men, the Master being on board. Half hour after they put out their wherry and very dangerously came aboard, the Master, 8 men and a woman with child. We had much ado to save the Master, being overboard between the ship and the wherry, but saved all them. We let go the wherry to save the men and the woman and saw no opportunity to save 2 seamen, an old soldier and an old woman left aboard. Bore up and came to our starboard tack…We left Captain Clarke hovering about him, but I could not perceive that he sent his boat to save them. The water increased 8 inches in the half hour the men forsook the Master, so gave them over for lost. We saw the ship swim until noon upon our poop and presently not to be seen on the main top, so judged her gone down.”

(Journals of Sir Thomas Acton edited by Anderson)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"It troubles me more to think of his venture, than of anything else in the whole warr."

SPOILER: Pepys's multifaceted attachment to the DoY is his future.

Pedro   Link to this

“It troubles me more to think of his venture, than of anything else in the whole warr.”

Times are changing, it used to be his patron Sandwich he was worried about.

Pedro   Link to this

Errata, should read…

The Journals of Sir Thomas Allin edited by Anderson.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Cape Roca

This Yank had forgot that part of his geography (thanks for the reminder, Pedro)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabo_da_Roca

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"To my office, where busy late, and then home to supper and to bed, and was troubled all this night with a pain in my left testicle, that run up presently into my left kidney and there kept akeing all night. In great pain."

The only question being...Was it Bess or Mary who kicked said testicle?

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...troubled all this night with a pain in my left testicle, that run up presently into my left kidney and there kept akeing all night. In great pain...."

Orchitis?

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchitis

Australian Susan   Link to this

Thanks, Pedro for the Allin Journals. On a par with Conrad, Forester or O'Brien really.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and so home, and there find our new chamber-mayde, Mary, come, which instead of handsome, as my wife spoke and still seems to reckon, is a very ordinary wench, I think, and therein was mightily disappointed."

Psych!!

Oh Sam, you fool. Elizabeth's got to be chortling up her sleeve...

CGS   Link to this

interesting "...and gone away with the greatest ingratitude..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“…and gone away with the greatest ingratitude…”

Well, it's been a job w/ free room & board; and she has also had the "greatest love and kindnesse and good clothes" that SP AND BP could offer.

What a deal! (Sure, she too got an earful once in a while; what's a servant for?)

Ruben   Link to this

"was troubled all this night with a pain in my left testicle, that run up presently into my left kidney and there kept akeing all night. In great pain"

This is what an MD will call "renal colic" in our day.
The patient tries to pass a stone that can be very big (like the one Samuel had when operated) or small like grains of sand. When the stone gets staked, somewhere in the urinary tract, the upper part of the ureter or urethra (depending or where the stone obstructs) begins to swell and to contract ("colic movement", like in the bowels) producing the typical pain that Samuel had. The effect on the autonomic system may also produce nausea and vomiting. When the stone passes, urine may have some blood in it. When the stones are very small you cannot see them, except with a microscope, like the one that was in Samuel's cabinet!

Mary   Link to this

"gone away with the greatest ingratitude..."

Sam's attitude has changed somewhat from the time when Elizabeth first complained about Besse and insisted that the maid had to go.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Great preparations for his speedy return to sea. I saw him try on his buff coat and hatpiece covered with black velvet."

Reminds me of those stories of early US Civil War soldiers running out to buy fancy uniforms before heading off to what would of course be glorious, bloodless, adventurous war. Ken Burns gives a nice tale of young George Custer getting all gussied-up and photographed. I wonder if the Duke had a portrait painter standing by.

language hat   Link to this

"This Yank had forgot that part of his geography (thanks for the reminder, Pedro)"

Same here, and thanks from me as well.

JWB   Link to this

"buff coat"

Gesture to the "Roundhead" Navy?

Mary   Link to this

A buff coat.

This was a protective coat made of leather that was worn by the military.

OED buff: properly, leather made of buffalo-hide; but usually applied to a very stout kind of leather made of ox-hide, dressed with oil, and having a characteristic fuzzy surface, and a dull, whitish-yellow colour.

Our adjective 'buff' is taken from the colour of this material, not vice-versa.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

On this day -- First Issue of 'Philosophical Transactions' published

"In 1662, the newly formed 'Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge' was granted a charter to publish by King Charles II and on 6 March 1665, the first issue of Philosophical Transactions was published under the visionary editorship of Henry Oldenburg, who was also the Secretary of the Society. The first volumes of what is now the world's oldest scientific journal in continuous publication were very different from today's journal, but in essence it served the same function; namely to inform the Fellows of the Society and other interested readers of the latest scientific discoveries. As such, Philosophical Transactions established the important principles of scientific priority and peer review, which have become the central foundations of scientific journals ever since."
http://rstl.royalsocietypublishing.org/

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