Sunday 5 March 1664/65

(Lord’s day). Up, and Mr. Burston bringing me by order my Lord’s plates, which he has been making this week. I did take coach and to my Lord Sandwich’s and dined with my Lord; it being the first time he hath dined at home since his coming from sea: and a pretty odd demand it was of my Lord to my Lady before me: “How do you, sweetheart? How have you done all this week?” himself taking notice of it to me, that he had hardly seen her the week before. At dinner he did use me with the greatest solemnity in the world, in carving for me, and nobody else, and calling often to my Lady to cut for me; and all the respect possible. After dinner looked over the plates, liked them mightily, and indeed I think he is the most exact man in what he do in the world of that kind. So home again, and there after a song or two in the evening with Mr. Hill, I to my office, and then home to supper and to bed.

12 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... bringing me by order my Lord’s plates ..."

L&M read 'plats' for 'plates' throughout.

These are the maps or plans SP ordered on February 18th.

".... Thence home; and took my Lord Sandwich’s draught of the harbour of Portsmouth down to Ratcliffe, to one Burston, ..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/02/18/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

But what was carved, Sam?

Say, does Sam actually mean Sandwich carved and Jem cut his meat for him? Or does he mean Jem sliced the bread or veggies?

Obviously, Sandwich has kept track of his protege's rise...He's always seemed a genuinely affectionate man but is he perhaps looking to keep friends secure?

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and a pretty odd demand it was of my Lord to my Lady before me: 'How do you, sweetheart? How have you done all this week?' himself taking notice of it to me, that he had hardly seen her the week before"

Nice slice of life there. It's always interesting when Sam quotes people directly. Sometimes the language seems so different, and then sometimes -- like today -- it's as if they were sitting across the room from us.

Good to see Sam and "My Lord" getting on again.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"Good to see Sam and 'My Lord' getting on again."
I agree. It may help that My Lord's financial debt to Sam has been substantially reduced, thus removing an irritant (to both parties) in the relationship.

Margaret   Link to this

“and a pretty odd demand it was of my Lord to my Lady before me: ‘How do you, sweetheart? How have you done all this week?’ himself taking notice of it to me, that he had hardly seen her the week before”

And it's comforting to see that, in a time when so many marriages were arranged for financial reasons, a husband and wife could still be fond of each other. I understand that "My Lord" and "My Lady" were both 17 when they married; it may have been a love match as well as an arranged marriage of convenience.

CGS   Link to this

"...a pretty odd demand it was of my Lord to my Lady before me: “How do you, sweetheart? ..." it reminds me of an old story. A man returns home from being away on a mission, so he takes his friend with him, then he man opens the door and chucks his hat in, then waits, if the hat does not come back out then it be safe to enter.

What lady wife would growl when accompanied by a good mutual respected friend, only a very unhappy untactful
lady would throw the slops over the man of the house.

dirk   Link to this

Diary of the Rev. Ralph Josselin for 5 March

"frost continued. this is a most bitter day with north wind and snow, at night my ink horn frozen. god good to me in the sabbath word and work, a sad time for work, trade, and yet people settle on their lees, lay nothing to heart."

dirk   Link to this

"But what was carved, Sam?"
(Robert's annotation above)

Well maybe this...

1. Neats-tongue and Udder.
2. Boil'd Chickens.
3. A Dish of stew'd Oysters.
4. A Dish of young Rabbits.
5. A grand Sallet.

Second Course:
1. A Dish of Soles, or Smelts.
2. Marinate Flounders.
3. A Lambstone-Pye.
4. An hundred of Asparagus.
5. A Warden-Pye.

Menu for the month of March from:
"The Gentlewoman's Companion: or, A Guide to the Female Sex.", 1675 -- "A Bill of Fare of Suitable Meat for every Month in the Year."

http://chaucer.library.emory.edu/cgi-bin/sgml2h...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

The Dutch war seems to be having one beneficial effect. Like most men of action, Sandwich never shows better or seems more content than when he has something useful to do. And it must be nice to be able to quietly pull back in a few old ex-Cromwellian sea comrades for his own fleet group. Anything to escape having to preside at show trials of old friends and sitting around a Court like Charles' as Master of the Wardrobe grubbing for money and the only adventure at hand chasing ladies.

I imagine he finds Sam's joy in his job a bit bewildering and rather amusing.

Don McCahill   Link to this

> And it’s comforting to see that, in a time when so many marriages were arranged for financial reasons, a husband and wife could still be fond of each other.

Not so unique, I think. I am reading about the civil wars 25 years earlier than SP's times, and when Charles I sent his wife (an arranged marriage, surely) off to Holland for her safety they parted with many tears, and then Charles rode along the cliffs of Dover, waving at the ship until it was out of sight.

Pedro   Link to this

Sorry to put a damper on the discussion but Robert Boyle says…

“Though I am not such an enemy to matrimony, as some (for want of understanding and raillery, I have sometimes used in discourse) are pleased to think me, and would not refuse you my advice (through I would not so readily give you my example) to turn votary to Hymen; yet I have observed so few happy matches, and so many unfortunate ones; and have so rarely seen men love their wives at the rate they did, whilst they were their mistresses; that I wonder not, that legislators thought it necessary to make marriages indissoluble, to make them lasting."

(Robert Boyle by More)

jeannine   Link to this

To Robert Boyle

"Marriage is a great institution, but I'm not ready for an institution yet."

Best Regards,
Mae West

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