Saturday 4 March 1664/65

Up very betimes, and walked, it being bitter cold, to Ratcliffe, to the plate-maker’s and back again. To the office, where we sat all the morning, I, with being empty and full of ayre and wind, had some pain to-day. Dined alone at home, my wife being gone abroad to buy some more things. All the afternoon at the office. William Howe come to see me, being come up with my Lord from sea: he is grown a discreet, but very conceited fellow. He tells me how little respectfully Sir W. Pen did carry it to my Lord onboard the Duke’s ship at sea; and that Captain Minnes, a favourite of Prince Rupert’s, do shew my Lord little respect; but that every body else esteems my Lord as they ought. I am sorry for the folly of the latter, and vexed at the dissimulation of the former. At night home to supper and to bed. This day was proclaimed at the ‘Change the war with Holland.

14 Annotations

CGS   Link to this

"...I, with being empty and full of ayre and wind, ..."
[He ]"...but very conceited fellow..."

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... This day was proclaimed at the ‘Change the war with Holland."

So in SP's mind the formalities are but an afterthought. And now we know the official 'cause,' --

His Majesties declaration touching his proceedings for reparation & satisfaction for several injuries, affronts and spoiles done by the East and West-India Companies, and other the subjects of the United Provinces
London : printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1664 [i.e. 1665]
8 p. ; 2⁰. With an initial order to print dated "Whitehall, February 22. 1664.", and signed: Richard Browne.

also the identical text was issued Edinburgh.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

At the very least thousands of lives disrupted by the press, surely many good men to die and suffer...I suppose Sam feels the die was cast a while ago. Still, even Czar Nicky hesitated on the brink of signing the mobilization for war, trembling for the responsibility. Was there any hint Charles was at least a bit thoughtful today contemplating the first step on the road that was to end the Stuart dynasty?

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"I, with being empty and full of ayre and wind, had some pain to-day."

Given how consistently he talks of having wind when he's not eaten, you'd think he'd grab a bite before heading out into the "bitter cold." I wonder why Sam so often makes such a point of not eating a substantial meal until dinner?

Terry F   Link to this

SPOILER? On 4 March

1681, King Charles II will grant a charter to William Penn (the younger) for an area of land that later became Pennsylvania, sc. Sir William "Penn's Forest" in lieu of a £16,000 debt that the Crown will owe Sir William (yea he who is at this very moment at sea, whose manners are deplored by Mr. S. Pepys, who sits at a desk and pushes paper). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Province_of_Pennsy...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"This day was proclaimed at the ‘Change the war with Holland."

The only time SP appears to have experienced any naval gunfire were the celebrations the day he returned from reading the Declaration of Breda to the various ship's companies and announcing the vote of the fleet 'Council of War' in support:-

" ... In the evening as I was going on board the Vice-Admiral, the General began to fire his guns, which he did all that he had in the ship, and so did all the rest of the Commanders, which was very gallant, and to hear the bullets go hissing over our heads as we were in the boat. ..."

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/05/03/

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"This day was proclaimed at the ‘Change the war with Holland."

The only time SP appears to have experienced any naval gunfire were the celebrations on May 3rd 1660 when he returned from reading the Declaration of Breda, and announcing the vote of the fleet 'Council of War' in support, to the various ship's companies:-

" ... In the evening as I was going on board the Vice-Admiral, the General began to fire his guns, which he did all that he had in the ship, and so did all the rest of the Commanders, which was very gallant, and to hear the bullets go hissing over our heads as we were in the boat. ..."

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/05/03/

Pedro   Link to this

“surely many good men to die and suffer…”

Summary from Gillian Darley’s biography of Evelyn…

Evelyn had become one of the Commissioners for the sick and wounded and prisoners of war, his main patch being Kent and Sussex…Hostilities began in Evelyn’s penetrating opinion, “because the Hollanders exceeded us in Industrie, and all things else but envy”…

Evelyn’s attitude towards Dutch prisoners was coloured by his sense of moral justice and proper rules of engagement during war, but also by his admiration (shared by many others) for the nation and its achievements.

Samuel Tuke pointed out from Paris that they were “your Christian brethren though now the public enemy…The common people in England are too apt to despise and insult our strangers and I believe the animosities are very great.” Yet Tuke envied Evelyn’s involvement…”to have the will and the means in some measure to redress the miseries of the effects.” He dreaded the aftermath: “I believe this war will make many cripples and it will be a dishonour to the nation to see them hopping and begging about the streets.” This led him to enquire…he was worried about English prisoners of war under the Dutch and hoped that teams of observers could go to inspect “one divine, one surgeon and a layman.”


Robin Peters   Link to this

Todd writes "Given how consistently he talks of having wind when he’s not eaten, you’d think he’d grab a bite before heading out into the “bitter cold.” I wonder why Sam so often makes such a point of not eating a substantial meal until dinner"

Now I remember in the early days of the diary, the drinking of a morning draught with various people was often mentioned. Has this changed? or is it too mundane to include in recent entries.

Firenze   Link to this

bitter cold: - this last day or so have been face-chewingly cold, with transiting snow showers. So, some continuity in the British climate there (albeit this is Scotland, not southern England).

Roger   Link to this

'it being bitter cold'

The average temperature in February 2008 in the south of England was 5.5C. According to Met Office stats the average for March 1665(for 'Central England') is/was 5C. A chilly Spring indeed.

JWB   Link to this

"I am sorry for the folly of the latter, and vexed at the dissimulation of the former."

I'm gonna save this sentence and use it every chance I get.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I wonder why Sam so often makes such a point of not eating a substantial meal until dinner?"

Keen observation, RP. The last day on which he recorded so much as a "morning draught" was Saturday 30 May 1663. (Of course, he does much off the record.) http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/05/30/

CGS   Link to this

Supping at the local eateries. Besides the pleasure it gave, it was also part of his mission to keep tabs on the local thinking for his Cousin.
He never mentions it but probably received a little sipping monies too, in order to make it easier to keep up with the mens gossip, [men of course, never gossip, it is for the ladies and their discussion on how to burp the latest edition]
Now that he is up in the heights of middle thinking, he has to concentrate of worthier items of running the Navy Office, rather than gathering mundane information, he has little time for 'the run of the mill' clerical types now, from whence he got his tattle tales and clues to where all that closet information be lying for future use..

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