Friday 13 January 1664/65

Up betimes and walked to my Lord Bellasses’s lodgings in Lincolne’s Inne Fieldes, and there he received and discoursed with me in the most respectfull manner that could be, telling me what a character of my judgment, and care, and love to Tangier he had received of me, that he desired my advice and my constant correspondence, which he much valued, and in my courtship, in which, though I understand his designe very well, and that it is only a piece of courtship, yet it is a comfort to me that I am become so considerable as to have him need to say that to me, which, if I did not do something in the world, would never have been. Here well satisfied I to Sir Ph. Warwicke, and there did some business with him; thence to Jervas’s and there spent a little idle time with him, his wife, Jane, and a sweetheart of hers. So to the Hall awhile and thence to the Exchange, where yesterday’s newes confirmed, though in a little different manner; but a couple of ships in the Straights we have lost, and the Dutch have been in Margaret [Margate] Road. Thence home to dinner and so abroad and alone to the King’s house, to a play, “The Traytor,” where, unfortunately, I met with Sir W. Pen, so that I must be forced to confess it to my wife, which troubles me. Thence walked home, being ill- satisfied with the present actings of the House, and prefer the other House before this infinitely. To my Lady Batten’s, where I find Pegg Pen, the first time that ever I saw her to wear spots. Here very merry, Sir W. Batten being looked for to-night, but is not yet come from Harwich. So home to supper and to bed.

23 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

War news and the police beat inventoried in the Carte Calendar

Broderick to Ormond
Written from: Wandsworth

Date: 13 January 1665

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 34, fol(s). 553
Document type: Holograph

Sir Jeremiah Smith's squadron sustained severe disasters during the late storm; and the news of it "caused insurance on the merchant-ships, under our convoy, to rise very high, upon the Exchange"; as it also doth on the Hamburgh Fleet - the greatest adventure ever sent to those parts. ...

My Lord of Albemarle prepares the Spring Fleet with all diligence; and, believing this new embassy from France [to be] designed only to amuse us, presseth hard to declare war. ...

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James, Duke of York, to Sir William Killigrewe, Colonel of the Duke's regiment of foot, or, in his absence to the officer in charge
Written from: Whitehall

Date: 13 January 1665

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 75, fol(s). 132
Document type: Original; signed & countersigned

Warrant for the sending to the Fleet, at Portsmouth, such men as the Earl of Sandwich may require.

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James, Duke of York, to Sandwich
Written from: Whitehall

Date: 13 January 1665

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 75, fol(s). 134
Document type: Original; subscribed & signed; with seal of arms

Has received Lord Sandwich's letter respecting the capture of a ship laden with Spanish wool. The ship may be detained, until further order be taken. Apprises Lord Sandwich that eight Dutch ships were about the North Foreland on Tuesday last. Desires his advice as to formation & despatch of a squadron to the Eastward.

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Ormond to Ossory
Written from: Whitehall

Date: 13 January 1665

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 145, fol(s). 95
Document type: Copy [in Letter Book]

Anthony Wilson, bearer of this letter, has informed Mr Secretary Bennet that if his brother William Wilson, who (he says) is a prisoner in the gaol of Monaghan, were set at liberty, they might jointly contribute towards the apprehension of several coiners, clippers, and vendors of false money, and would be ready to give evidence in any of his Majesty's Courts of Justice. ...

If the Lord Deputy, upon inquiry, shall think them to be capable of performing that service, all possible encouragement therein should be afforded to them. ...

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Pedro   Link to this

James, Duke of York, to Sandwich …“Apprises Lord Sandwich that eight Dutch ships were about the North Foreland on Tuesday last.”

And yesterday as Jeannine’s information shows, Sam was quicker off the mark…

“so to the ‘Change, where to my last night’s ill news I met more. Spoke with a Frenchman who was taken, but released, by a Dutch man-of-war of thirty-six guns (with seven more of the like or greater ships), off the North Foreland, by Margett. Which is a strange attempt, that they should come to our teeth; but the wind being easterly, the wind that should bring our force from Portsmouth, will carry them away home.”

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"but the wind being easterly, the wind that should bring our force from Portsmouth, will carry them away home.”

As Mary posted 'yesterday,' "Sam should surely have written ‘westerly’." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/01/12/#c20...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

If Jane-the-elusive has a sweetheart, I'm surprised SP says nothing about how he feels about that.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Maybe it's because it no longer matters, given that he's also being courted, by Lord Bellasses? The lust for power overcoming the lust for belle asses, perhaps?

(I'll get my coat...)

Michael L   Link to this

Someone named "Pegg Pen" looking spotty? This is too easy a target.

cgs   Link to this

spot not spotty, it be the custom of the day not much different than the lasses of today wearing minis and heavy makeup. This was a beauty enhancement, the lass be up to the latest fashion standard the court of Charles.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

cgs is spot on about black patches as the forunners of beauty-marks. http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1252/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beauty_mark

Terry Foreman   Link to this

That should be forerunners, of course. At ca. 28 years old, Ms. Penn needs a little something to draw the eyes of male suitors. (I wonder whether most men notice such style details as much as other women do; I doubt it.)

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... to a play, “The Traytor,” where, unfortunately, I met with Sir W. Pen, so that I must be forced to confess it to my wife, which troubles me. ..."

The Almighty being far more understanding of the necessity for close reading of the clauses and sub-clauses of oaths.

"And here I must confess breach of a vowe in appearance, but I not desiring it, but against my will, and my oathe being to go neither at my own charge nor at another’s, as I had done by becoming liable to give them another, as I am to Sir W. Pen and Mr. Creed; but here I neither know which of them paid for me, nor, if I did, am I obliged ever to return the like, or did it by desire or with any willingness. So that with a safe conscience I do think my oathe is not broke and judge God Almighty will not think it other wise."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/09/28/

Ralph Berry   Link to this

"but the wind being easterly, the wind that should bring our force from Portsmouth, will carry them away home"

As an old sailor I read this that if there is a change in the wind, i.e. it altered to a westerly, the change would bring our force from Portsmouth however the changed wind would also carry the Dutch home first. Perhaps if there was a "but" after "easterly" it would be clearer.

Capt.Petrus. Dorpmans   Link to this

13th.Jan.1665.

"...Up betimes and walked to my Lord Bellasses's lodgings in Lincolne's Inne Fieldes..."

John Lord Belasyse, Governor of Tangier.

O.F.Morshead. 1947. "Everybody's Pepys".
London G.Bell and Sons.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...him, his wife, Jane, and a sweetheart of hers."

"Well, you won't be needing this anymore." Jane handing Sam his ripped-out heart as he tries to make polite conversation to her beau.

Good ole Jane...Sweeney himself couldn't have done Sam such a cut.

Don McCahill   Link to this

> Jane, and a sweetheart of hers

Are we assuming a modern meaning of the language here, that sweetheart must be of the opposite sex. I mean, Jane's husband is present, surely this is not a lover.

Can someone with the OED see if there is an alternative meaning for sweetheart (I know we now use the term for children of either sex, perhaps at the time it was also a close confident.)

Mary   Link to this

Jane and her sweetheart

Jane is not Mrs. Jervis. She is Jane Welch/Welsh, an employee in Jervis's barber shop. She may well have a sweetheart, though it is perhaps slightly surprising that Jervis is inclined to tolerate 'followers'during working hours. (Whether Jervis would count Pepys as a bona fide follower is, of course, a nice quesion).

Except where small children are concerned, OED cites no passages where 'sweetheart' is clearly a term of endearment used between same-sex individuals

Bradford   Link to this

"I wonder whether most men notice such style details as much as other women do; I doubt it."

Pepys did, though officially he is hors de concours. . . .

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to a play, “The Traytor,” where, unfortunately, I met with Sir W. Pen, so that I must be forced to confess it to my wife, which troubles me."

Michael Robinson, do you suppose that "the Almighty" in this case is Elizabeth Pepys, who must be told -- before she finds out via the gossip of the Penns' help -- that her husband attended a play without her?

Mary   Link to this

Peg Penn's spots.

I think that this Peg Penn is the teenage daughter of Sir Wm., born 1651.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Surely there are worse things Penn might be aware of going on, Sam... I can't imagine no one at the office has noticed poor Mrs. Bagwell lurking about your door. Or that on trips to Whitehall, Penn and the others haven't noted your friendly Betty Martin nee Lane offering an unusually cheery greeting...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Has Samuel made a deal with Elizabeth not to attend a play without her?

Linda F   Link to this

Because Sam speaks of "a" sweetheart of Jane's, the suggestion is that she has multiple admirers -- some of whom, unlike Pepys, might actually have honorable intentions.
Could Sam's not wanting Elisabeth to know he's been to the theatre without her have anything to do with economy? -- knowing she will be upset by his failure to limit expenditures while he requires her to account closely for her own?

cgs   Link to this

Sweet be attached to many nouns.
OED: sweetheart, n. 1. a. (Properly two words: see HEART n. 14.) A term of endearment = darling: used chiefly in the vocative. Also used ironically or contemptuously.
c1290 ...

(1649) App. 274 The King taking the Duke of Glocester upon His Knee, said, Sweet-heart now they will cut off thy Fathers Head.

2. One who is loved illicitly; a paramour. Obs.
1589

Kevin Peter   Link to this

I don't think Sam cares much about whether Jane has a sweetheart, as long as he gets what he wants from her. He wasn't at all concerned or jealous when Betty Lane got married (other than thinking that she'd made a terrible choice), and it didn't stop him from getting what he wanted from her.

Likewise, the fact Mrs. Bagwell is married didn't bother him in the slightest. He certainly doesn't seem very attached to these women, unlike his own wife, where he becomes jealous quite often.

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