Monday 21 November 1664

Up, and with them to the Lords at White Hall, where they do single me out to speake to and to hear, much to my content, and received their commands, particularly in several businesses. Thence by their order to the Attorney General’s about a new warrant for Captain Taylor which I shall carry for him to be Commissioner in spite of Sir W. Batten, and yet indeed it is not I, but the ability of the man, that makes the Duke and Mr. Coventry stand by their choice. I to the ‘Change and there staid long doing business, and this day for certain newes is come that Teddiman hath brought in eighteen or twenty Dutchmen, merchants, their Bourdeaux fleete, and two men of wary to Portsmouth.1 And I had letters this afternoon, that three are brought into the Downes and Dover; so that the warr is begun: God give a good end to it! After dinner at home all the afternoon busy, and at night with Sir W. Batten and Sir J. Minnes looking over the business of stating the accounts of the navy charge to my Lord Treasurer, where Sir J. Minnes’s paper served us in no stead almost, but was all false, and after I had done it with great pains, he being by, I am confident he understands not one word in it. At it till 10 at night almost. Thence by coach to Sir Philip Warwicke’s, by his desire to have conferred with him, but he being in bed, I to White Hall to the Secretaries, and there wrote to Mr. Coventry, and so home by coach again, a fine clear moonshine night, but very cold. Home to my office awhile, it being past 12 at night; and so to supper and to bed.

  1. Captain Sir Thomas Teddiman (or Tyddiman) had been appointed Rear-Admiral of Lord Sandwich’s squadron of the English fleet. In a letter from Sir William Coventry to Secretary Bennet, dated November 13th, 1664, we read, “Rear Admiral Teddeman with four or five ships has gone to course in the Channel, and if he meet any refractory Dutchmen will teach them their duty” (“Calendar of State Papers,” Domestic, 1664.-65, p. 66).

15 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"Up, and with them" -- i.e., Sirs Batten and Mennes (probably not Lady Batten).

Terry F   Link to this

These are "two men of war" to Portsmouth, of course; wary they'd best be.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

As we've noted before, by an odd coincidence we seem to be almost in perfect synch with Sam's lunar cycle. It's a fine moonlight night here, too; full moon tomorrow night, I believe.

cape henry   Link to this

"Oh what a strutting little barnyard cock we are, crowing on our dunghill!"
--Australian Susan 11.20

I could not agree with her more. Of late, as Sam's position has evolved upward, some aspects of his personality - at least as they are recorded in this diary - have deteriorated. Though today he demonstrates great competence, there is a new tone developing in these entries.

cgs   Link to this

get the Dutch back lit and pop off some smoke.

Terry F   Link to this

"the warr is begun"

In accordance with "[An Order] by the Committee of his Majesty’s … Privy Council, for the affairs of the Admiralty & Navy [for the arrest of all ships & vessels, belonging to the States-General of the United Provinces of the Netherlands]

Written from: Whitehall

Date: 18 November 1664"
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/11/18/#c19...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... so that the warr is begun: God give a good end to it!"

The Character of Holland
by Andrew Marvell

Holland, that scarce deserves the name of Land,
As but th'Off-scouring of the Brittish Sand;
And so much Earth as was contributed
By English Pilots when they heav'd the Lead;
Or what by th' Oceans slow alluvion fell,
Of shipwrackt Cockle and the Muscle-shell;
This indigested vomit of the Sea
Fell to the Dutch by just Propriety.

And now again our armed Bucentore
Doth yearly their Sea-Nuptials restore.
And how the Hydra of seaven Provinces
Is strangled by our Infant Hercules.
Their Tortoise wants its vainly stretched neck;
Their Navy all our Conquest or our Wreck:
Or, what is left, their Carthage overcome
Would render fain unto our better Rome.
Unless our Senate, lest their Youth disuse,
The War, (but who would) Peace if begg'd refuse.
....

(Conclusion)
For now of nothing may our State despair,
Darling of Heaven, and of Men the Care;
Provided that they be what they have been,
Watchful abroad, and honest still within.
For while our Neptune doth a Trident shake, Blake,
Steel'd with those piercing Heads, Dean, Monck and
And while Jove governs in the highest Sphere,
Vainly in Hell let Pluto domineer.

Composed 1653 (probably February / March) but begins to circulate again in Mss at this time, later in print.

Complete text:-
http://www.infoplease.com/t/lit/marvell/holland...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... so that the warr is begun: God give a good end to it!"

And an example of an old Dutch 'atrocity' now re-cycled to whip up the English patriotic fervor:-

"English residents were accused by the Dutch of conspiring to capture the island. An English surgeon, David Price, was imprisoned and tortured until he confessed that the surprise and capture of the castle on Amboyna was contemplated by he and his compatriots, whereupon all the other English upon the island were imprisoned and tortured. Several confessed to whatever their tormentors put into their mouths. Others resisted every torture applied. Scott relates the torture of John Clarke as typical of their experience.

...they bound a cloth about his necke and face so close that little or no water could go by. That done, they poured the water softly upon his head untill the cloth was full, up to the mouth and nostrills, and somewhat higher; so that he could not draw breath, but he must withall suck-in the water: which being still continued to be poured in softly, forced all his inward parts, came out of his nose, eares and eyes, and often as it were stifling and choaking him, at length took away his breath, and brought him to a swounce or fainting. Then they tooke him quickly downe, and made him vomit up the water. Being a little recovered, they triced him up againe, poured water as before, eftsoones taking him downe as he seemed to be stifled.

A True Relation of the Most Cruell and Barbarous Proceedings Against the English at Amboyna, London, 1624"

http://iarnuocon.newsvine.com/_news/2007/11/03/...
also:-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amboyna_Massacre

andy   Link to this

A week has passed since the seduction of Bagwell's wife - and has Mr B got his new position yet?

George R   Link to this

That Sir John Minnes seems like some bosses that I have known. Appear useless but happy to stand aside and let the juniors put things right, then still take the credit. Still they were the bosses and were paid a lot more for being so. At least our man feels he is getting some recognition and we know that he won't be forgotten.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

they bound a cloth about his necke and face so close that little or no water could go by. That done, they poured the water softly upon his head untill the cloth was full, up to the mouth and nostrills, and somewhat higher; so that he could not draw breath,

Isn't this what they call "waterboarding" at Guantanamo?

JWB   Link to this

Allow me to suggest that now would be a good time to read A.T.Mahan's first 2 chapters of "The Influence of Sea Power Upon History,1600-1783", which can be found here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13529/13529-h/13...

Pedro   Link to this

Meanwhile Holmes tries to press in Lisbon.

The Jersey and the Brill had suffered severely in the storms before Lisbon, and Holmes new that it was unwise to take defective ships across the Bay and up the Channel, so he had stopped to refit.

On the 21st of November, as he assumed war with Holland would break out at any moment, he was determined to press every English seaman he could find under a foreign flag, including that of the Portuguese ally:

“…and seeing one of the King of Portugal’s frigatts coming in, commanded as I understood by a Knight of Malta, on board of which I was informed were a great many English seamen, I sent my Lieutenant before in my Pinace to demand them, which he refusing to deliver just under Bellile castle I closed my wind with intention to aboard him…”

Hostilities were narrowly avoided, but to Holmes’ annoyance the Knight got all his Englishmen ashore and gave them enough money to make themselves scarce. Next day, the refit completed, Holmes sailed for England on a fine fresh south-westerly gale.

(Man of War by Ollard)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Still no word from good ole Balty?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...and after I had done it with great pains, he being by, I am confident he understands not one word in it."

"And now just sign here, Sir John."

"Yes. I say I'm rather puzzled, Pepys. This doesn't look at all like my paper."

"Just a few 'modifications', Sir John."

"Yes...Deuced grateful for your assist, Pepys. Damn. Seem to have twisted my wrist. Would you perhaps do the honors there, Pepys? Just note me down as having passed it onto you? Capital. Can't let you go without some credit, eh? Yes."

"Fine, Sir John. Fine." signs.

"Ah."

Heh. I may not understand one word in it...But I'm not going to the Tower...Beaming smile at the exasperated Pepys.

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