Friday 19 February 1663/64

Up in good order in my head again and shaved myself, and then to the office, whither Mr. Cutler came, and walked and talked with me a great while; and then to the ‘Change together; and it being early, did tell me several excellent examples of men raised upon the ‘Change by their great diligence and saving; as also his owne fortune, and how credit grew upon him; that when he was not really worth 1100l., he had credit for 100,000l. of Sir W. Rider how he rose; and others. By and by joyned with us Sir John Bankes; who told us several passages of the East India Company; and how in his very case, when there was due to him and Alderman Mico 64,000l. from the Dutch for injury done to them in the East Indys, Oliver presently after the peace, they delaying to pay them the money, sent them word, that if they did not pay them by such a day, he would grant letters of mark to those merchants against them; by which they were so fearful of him, they did presently pay the money every farthing. By and by, the ‘Change filling, I did many businesses, and about 2 o’clock went off with my uncle Wight to his house, thence by appointment we took our wives (they by coach with Mr. Mawes) and we on foot to Mr. Jaggard, a salter, in Thames Street, for whom I did a courtesy among the poor victuallers, his wife, whom long ago I had seen, being daughter to old Day, my uncle Wight’s master, is a very plain woman, but pretty children they have. They live methought at first in but a plain way, but afterward I saw their dinner, all fish, brought in very neatly, but the company being but bad I had no great pleasure in it. After dinner I to the office, where we should have met upon business extraordinary, but business not coming we broke up, and I thither again and took my wife; and taking a coach, went to visit my Ladys Jemimah and Paulina Montagu, and Mrs. Elizabeth Pickering, whom we find at their father’s new house1 in Lincolne’s Inn Fields; but the house all in dirt. They received us well enough; but I did not endeavour to carry myself over familiarly with them; and so after a little stay, there coming in presently after us my Lady Aberguenny and other ladies, we back again by coach, and visited, my wife did, my she cozen Scott, who is very ill still, and thence to Jaggard’s again, where a very good supper and great store of plate; and above all after supper Mrs. Jaggard did at my entreaty play on the Vyall, but so well as I did not think any woman in England could and but few Maisters, I must confess it did mightily surprise me, though I knew heretofore that she could play, but little thought so well. After her I set Maes to singing, but he did it so like a coxcomb that I was sick of him. About 11 at night I carried my aunt home by coach, and then home myself, having set my wife down at home by the way. My aunt tells me they are counted very rich people, worth at least 10 or 12,000l., and their country house all the yeare long and all things liveable, which mightily surprises me to think for how poore a man I took him when I did him the courtesy at our office. So after prayers to bed, pleased at nothing all the day but Mrs. Jaggard playing on the Vyall, and that was enough to make me bear with all the rest that did not content me.

  1. The Earl of Sandwich had just moved to a house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Elizabeth Pickering, who afterwards married John Creed, was niece to Lord Sandwich.

12 Annotations

ruizhe   Link to this

"Did a courtesy"? For Jaggard?
Then SP got 2 free meals out of it, I presume (anything else?)

ruizhe   Link to this

"Did a courtesy"? For Jaggard?
Then SP got 2 free meals out of it, I presume (anything else?)

Terry F   Link to this

?? "...pleased at nothing all the day but Mrs. Jaggard playing on the Vyall...."

Nothing?! Has Samuel forgot his morning study of the 'Change, how keenly he listened to the "several excellent examples of men raised upon the 'Change by their great diligence and saving" -- men (he seems to have thought) whose practise of virtues he too prizes led to their wealth? (and why not I?)

MissAnn   Link to this

"... is a very plain woman, but pretty children they have." - How many times do we see this still - beautiful people with plain children and vice versa.

cumsalisgrano   Link to this

With all those 4 letter words casted in to so many paragraphs, then organised into 22 chapters, bound to create a problem. Still have not created a dictionary to make sure the spelling be rite. Look at the mess we make with an arc and simply strokes, tweake here, tweake there, it is soon be unreadable.

Mary   Link to this

Tales from the Exchange.

Does it strike anyone else that these success stories sound remarkably like a 'come-on'? Pepys is perceived to be a rising man in an office that affords the means of amassing a bit of capital. Could it be that his guides to mercantile life are preparing him for an approach for investment in as yet unspecified business opportunities?

JWB   Link to this

"Tales from the Exchange"

The tale about Oliver sounded prescriptive to me- a word in the right ear about how such matters successfully handled in the past.

Bradford   Link to this

"that when he was not really worth 1100l., he had credit for 100,000l."

Anything like having a $30,000 line of credit on your credit card with a minimum monthly payment of $15?

At least the fish dinner was brought in "neatly," with no dirty thumbprints on the plates, but apparently no chips.

cumsalisgrano   Link to this

Bradford : thy word , handshake and seeing the whites of thine eyes, was thy bond and the stocks [not wall street] were available for the wayward, along with a shower rotten eggs, there be seven places to house the forgetfull or the indigent.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"Tales from the Exchange"

I see a little of both Mary's "come on" to Sam and JWB's note about how conflicts with the Dutch were handled better (for the merchants) under Oliver Cromwell. They're testing Sam in more than one way.

Nix   Link to this

"they word, handshake and seeing the whites of thine eyes, was thy bond" --

There was also the little matter of debtors' prison. Living large on borrowed money was a much riskier game then than now.

Nix   Link to this

... and if you loaned Jaggard money that he couldn't repay, you couldn't get no satisfaction.

(Sorry -- someone had to say it.)

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