Thursday 22 October 1668

Up, and W. Batelier’s Frenchman, a perriwigg maker, comes and brings me a new one, which I liked and paid him for: a mighty genteel fellow. So to the office, where sat all the morning, and at noon home to dinner, and thence with wife and Deb. to Crow’s, and there did see some more beds; and we shall, I think, pitch upon a camlott one, when all is done. Thence sent them home, and I to Arundell House, where the first time we have met since the vacation, and not much company: but here much good discourse, and afterwards my Lord and others and I to the Devil tavern, and there eat and drank, and so late, with Mr. Colwell, home by coach; and at home took him with me, and there found my uncle Wight and aunt, and Woolly and his wife, and there supped, and mighty merry. And anon they gone, and Mrs. Turner staid, who was there also to talk of her husband’s business; and the truth is, I was the less pleased to talk with her, for that she hath not yet owned, in any fit manner of thanks, my late and principal service to her husband about his place, which I alone ought to have the thanks for, if they know as much as I do; but let it go: if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it. So to bed. This day word come for all the Principal Officers to bring them [the Commissioners of Accounts] their patents, which I did in the afternoon, by leaving it at their office, but am troubled at what should be their design therein.


15 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I to Arundell House, where the first time we have met since the vacation, and not much company: but here much good discourse "

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

Octob: 22. 1668. Heuelius his cometography prsented
[ http://astronomy.edwardworthlibrary.ie/Comets ]) The president desired that those persons to whom the Authour had presented a coppy of this Book would pervse it & bring in their thoughts of it. those persons were named to be the Bishop of Salisb: Dr. Wallis mr Hook & mr Oldenburg

(curiosity from Phil Vernatti (Ld Sandwich Obseruation of the Last comet. feb: 5. 1667/8. eclipse of the moon)

De graffs book de virorum organis generationj inferuientibus
[ http://humupd.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/4/365.… ]) correspondence, by Beringhen desired with the R Academy of Paris) - Letter from Bermoodas) Sr. R Southwells papers from Portugall of Ieronimo Lobo.) Papers about Mendip mines from mr Glanvill).

The president mentiond that he vnderstood that the curator had erected a tube to try whether he could obserue to a second minute the passing of a fixt starr ouer the zenith and thence find a parallax of the earths ebb in order to determine the earths motion. after this it being proposd by the Curator that the Expts. of motion might be prosecuted therby to state it

Last the nature & laws of motion. the Pt. desired that it might be considerd whether it were soe proper & necessary to try these sorts of expts. since mor Hugens & Dr. Chr. wren had already taken great paines about that subiect & were thought to haue found a theory to explicate the phenomena of motion by (Oldenburg. to write to both.).

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_folio.…

Chris Squire  •  Link

‘camlet, n. Etym: French . .
a. A name originally applied to some beautiful and costly eastern fabric, afterwards to imitations and substitutes the nature of which has changed many times over. ‘A kind of stuff originally made by a mixture of silk and camel's hair; it is now made with wool and silk’ (Johnson). ‘A light stuff, formerly much used for female apparel, made of long wool, hard spun, sometimes mixed in the loom with cotton or linen yarn’ (Ure). It is uncertain whether it was ever made of camel's hair; but in the 16th and 17th c. it was made of the hair of the Angora goat.

According to S. W. Beck, Draper's Dict., ‘In [the] production [of camlets], the changes have been rung with all materials in nearly every possible combination; sometimes of wool, sometimes of silk, sometimes of hair, sometimes of hair with wool or silk, at others of silk and wool warp and hair woof‥Those of our day have had cotton and linen introduced into their composition. They have been made plain and twilled, of single warp and weft, of double warp, and sometimes with double weft also’.
. . c1660 J. Evelyn Diary anno 1644 (1955) II. 146, I went to see their Manifactures in silke‥their pressing & watering the Grograns & Chambletts.
1680 R. Morden Geogr. Rectified (1685) 327 Famous‥for good Chamlets.

. . 1662 S. Pepys Diary 6 Mar. (1970) III. 42 This night my new Camelott riding Coate‥came home . . ‘ [OED]

Chris Squire  •  Link

‘patent, n. Etym: . . short for letters patent . .
I. Senses relating to a document conferring a right, privilege, etc.
1.a. Law. A document conferring some privilege, right, office, title, or property; = letters patent n. at patent adj. 1a.
. . c1500 (1475) Assembly of Gods (1896) 494, I wold nat yeue ii pesecoddys For graunt of your patent of offyce ner of fee.
. . 1695 R. Sibbald Autobiogr. (1834) 132, I‥was examined‥and gott my patent of Doctor ther . . ‘ [OED]

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Spoiler...

Sam...Sam...Pepys...

"Wh-What? Who is that?"

Sam...Repent...Quickly...

"Repent? Lord, is that you?"

Uh...Yes, God Almightly, Sam...Repent...At once...

"Repent what, Lord?"

You know damned well what, Sam...Repent...Before...

"Before what, Lord? Is something wrong with my new coach? It's too showy, isn't it?"

Forget the damned coach, you idiot...You know what I mean...I can say no more...Repent, Sam...Repent...

"Sam'l?"

"Bess, did you hear that outside the closet?"

"What? I only heard you talking to someone. Who were you talking to?"

"I think Almighty God wants us to rethink the coach entirely, Bess."

"Oh, please...Are you trying to back out of this now? Sam'l...I want my...Our...Coach. We deserve it."

"But God Almighty..."

"Why would God Almighty care if you bought a coach? He never stopped Admiral Sir Will from getting one."

Hmmmn...Point there...

"Maybe it was something else...? Assuming it really was God and you didn't fall asleep or something."

Hmmn...

"Have you anything to feel guilty about, Sam'l? Anything at all?"

Hmmn...No exceptionally questionable gifts recently...Didn't need to abandon another colleague to the Parliamentary wolves these last months...Can't really think of anything...

"Why no, not at all...It must have been a dream. Yes."

(Well, I tried...)
***

Robert Gertz  •  Link

"...pitch upon a camlott one..."

And a new perriwig?

Spending like a drunken sailor on his first post-pay-day leave are we? What means this open purse? Relief at the success of the Great Letter? A desire to be described in the City as a well-to-do man to spite Creed? "I made it, you married it"? I'm surprised he wouldn't be worried it might be talked about...

And then comes this little blow...

"This day word come for all the Principal Officers to bring them [the Commissioners of Accounts] their patents, which I did in the afternoon, by leaving it at their office, but am troubled at what should be their design therein."

Gulp...

Interesting though...No thought of going to the Duke or King to object on the grounds of royal perogative? Even though the Duke is Lord High Admiral? I'd've thought Sam would try to get such backing immediately, is Parliament's position so secure now that no royal official would consider refusing to accept such a command without insisting on consulting the King or his deputy first?

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Mrs. Turner...hath not yet owned, in any fit manner of thanks, my late and principal service to her husband about his place, which I alone ought to have the thanks for, if they know as much as I do; but let it go: if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it. "

Pepys has already had it in hand once
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/09/20/#c3575…

What now?!
.

languagehat  •  Link

"...if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it."

Sam's less attractive side. (File under: Power corrupts.)

JWB  •  Link

“…if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it.”

The 500 ponied-up on Sandwich's return is rankling.

Liz  •  Link

‘Up, and W. Batelier’s Frenchman, a perriwigg maker, comes and brings me a new one’
To replace the one that caught fire, presumably!

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The volume of Domestic State Papers covering correspondence from Oct. 1668 to Dec. 1669 is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=vik5AQAAM…

@@@
Oct. 22? 1668
Thos. Ross to Williamson.

I am commanded by the King to come for a warrant for the apprehension of Wilson, author of “Nehushtan.”
If Wilson is the man, pray give the warrant to Dawson, the messenger, as he knows him, and most of Calvert's relations.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 46.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
Warrant to apprehend Welsh,
and bring him before the Lords referees concerning the Mint.
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 86.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
Warrant to John Dawson
to apprehend Wilson,
supposed to be the author of a factious and scandalous book called “Nehushtan.”
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 86.]
===

Nehushtan, the Copper Serpent: Its Origins and Fate: The Torah describes Moses building a copper serpent to heal the Israelites. According to Kings, Hezekiah destroys it because it was being worshiped. Archaeology and history clarify the religious and political meaning of this image. https://www.thetorah.com/article/nehushtan-the-co…

But the book printed in 1668 was
“Nehushtan, or, A sober and peaceable discourse, concerning the abolishing of things abused to superstition and idolatry which may serve as one intire, and sufficient argument, to evince that the liturgy, ceremonies, and other things used at this day in the Church of England, ought neither to be imposed, nor retained, but utterly extirpated and laid aside : and to vindicate the non-conformists in their refusal to close with them.” -- By Joseph Wilson, died 1672. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo2/A66578.0001.00…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Oct. 22 1668.
The Crown, the Downs
Capt. Wm. Poole to Sir Wm. Penn.

Sailed from Kinsale on the 19th with the Norwich, but lost her company near Scilly, weather being thick.

Desires cables may be sent down, which will be redelivered when they come up the river;
fears else for the safety of the ship, if there be stress of wind in the Downs.
S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 39.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
Col. B. Reymes to the Navy Commissioners.

A bill of exchange is due from me, which calls for money, and my dependence on the present payment of your office has so disappointed me that unless you help, I shall very much suffer.

I will never fall into the like fault again.
S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 41.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
Portsmouth
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners.

The Dartmouth is ready to sail.

Has treated with Mr. Mayle about 200 very good trees or 500 loads of timber in Titchfield Park, at 38s. per load at Warsash, or 40s. at Fareham.
Inclines to the first place, as being the better lading place for the hoys.

The timber is to be well squared, and 50 feet to the load, which will be a very good bargain;
knows of no supply like to it, except in New Forest.

Mayle wants 300/. on the delivery of 200 loads, and the remainder when all is down.
He gives them 14 days to take or refuse it, and if they take it not, those of Southampton will, and will give a greater price.
[1] page. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 42.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Oct. 22 1668.
Portsmouth
Capt. John Tinker, master attendant, to Pepys.

The Milford shall remain where she is, and will proceed no farther without
orders.

I know no more of Mr. Steventon's account than that he said he had sent it.

I have had 9 dozen of oars at 18s. per dozen brought in, and have promised payment, not doubting reimbursement, for the Dartmouth could not go to sea without oars;

I shall not meddle with any more, until you order money to pay for these.

We want hand spikes, and I am going to view some.

Pray remember me when you meet with his Royal Highness, who promised, when here, to help me concerning my bills, or with the Earl of Anglesey.

I have been 3 years out of my money for accepting his Majesty's bills.
[2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 43.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
Letter Office
James Hickes to (Williamson)

I will wait upon you and Sir Gilbert Talbot in Tothill Fields, or at the Globe near there, on Monday, unless the meeting is put off.

I must hint that Sir Original Foster has done very unhandsomely by all archers in and about the City; for after his Majesty's restoration, they had a great desire to have the former commission concerning archery and shooting renewed, and a collection of money was made, and also fair progress with the Attorney-General by Mr. Arnold and Mr.Dunn;
but at length the Attorney-General told them there was a caveat entered to stop it by Sir Original Foster.

He owned to it, and informed them that except by his means, they should never obtain it.

Arnold and Dunn summoned a meeting of the archers, when it was agreed to hand Sir Original Foster the 24/. collected, and instruct him to prosecute and manage their affairs.

This he zealously promised, and as he was known to be a worthy person, and a great lover of archery, they did not require his signature, but thought it sufficient to take his word and promise to return the money, if he did not obtain the commission, which he has not done.

Mr. Dunn will attend you and Sir Gilbert Talbot on Monday, to give a fair account of the proceedings.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 44.]

@@@
Oct. 22 1668.
The Greenwich Frigate, Chatham River
Capt. Rich. Beach to Williamson.

I wrote informing you that I had brought a colt, as a present from Major Fairborne at Landguard; I took great care of him, and on arriving at Portsmouth left him at the Antelope inn.

I find you have heard nothing about it; that you will not blame me for the negligent Postmaster not delivering my letter, and that you will send for the colt; it wants bleeding and attending to.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 45.]
===
Williamson ... FGS take care of your gift horse. I'm tired of reading about it already.

john  •  Link

"for that she hath not yet owned, in any fit manner of thanks, my late and principal service to her husband about his place, which I alone ought to have the thanks for, if they know as much as I do; but let it go: if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it."

I read this as anger by Pepys in not receiving proper thanks for service rendered (by Pepys to the Turners) and determination to let them know.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Agreed, John ... but I have read similar vindictive threats by Pepys in the past, and do not remember him actually doing anything in revenge. We shall see ...

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.