Annotations and comments

Tonyel has posted 223 annotations/comments since 11 March 2013.

Comments

About Friday 5 May 1665

Tonyel  •  Link

Also in the Horniman Museum in Forest Hill, London when I lived nearby many years ago. I hope their descendants are buzzing still.

About Sunday 16 April 1665

Tonyel  •  Link

"Sometimes it is the strictly commonplace utterances of the Great and Good that are noted"

Our own longstanding heir to the throne recently made an old and weak pun in a speech concerning his genes and having trouble fitting into his jeans. The assembled company roared with forced laughter no doubt confirming in his mind, as with so many other kings and presidents, that he must be something special. At least the earlier Charles had a reputation for supplying a prompt and accurate riposte to comments and situations which suggests intelligence and a ready wit.

About Friday 14 April 1665

Tonyel  •  Link

"They appear to agree that Will Howe has been saying and doing things behind their back, possibly discovering that what he has said to each of them is in some way contradicted by what he has said to the other. Maybe Howe has said uncomplimentary things about Pepys to Creed and similar unpleasing opinions of Creed have been offered by Howe to Pepys."
Or..... maybe Will Howe has repeated exactly what Creed and Sam have said about each other but both need to deny it. "Will Howe said that I said what? About you? You know he's not to be trusted, my dear good friend!"

About Wednesday 5 April 1665

Tonyel  •  Link

There is a difference between pointing out a contrast that allows us to appreciate Sam's world better and simply venting based on present-day preconceptions, whether it's "Oh dear, Sam's taking bribes!" or "Oh dear, it's just like Pat Robertson!" No, really, it's not.

Actually, it often is. The contrasts between Sam's times and ours are fascinating but the similarities (Hypocrisy, greed, lust, etc) are equally so. Plus ca change... to coin a cliche.

About Friday 31 March 1665

Tonyel  •  Link

"This money is in cash in his bank and if it be in cold gold coin, one oz. then be worth 2 quid, recently one oz. be worth a mille dollars or 500 royal pounds,"

And ten years later it's almost doubled (in pounds anyway). Real wealth, then and now, is having enough f***-off money set aside to feel safe from what life or politicians can throw at you.

About Thursday 23 March 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

“The King, the Duke and the Duchess went down to the Hope aboard my ship the Prince.

Could that explain the noises of guns at Deal? I assume that the King or the Duke would warrant a salute from the fleet.

About Tuesday 21 March 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

"An abundance of loose women" - quite an attractive collective noun.
And surely Mississippi John Hurt's Candy Man must be a descendant of the Muffin Man.

Sorry, get back on topic.

About Tuesday 21 February 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

My Lady tells me how my Lord Castlemayne is coming over from France, and is believed will be made friends with his Lady again.

I love the expression on Castlemaine's face in the link. You can almost hear him saying "Women, eh?" with a shrug of the shoulders.

About Friday 10 February 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

I wonder how Sam got into the pickle of having lent so much money to Sandwich in the first place?

This is the problem when you start amassing some wealth and there are no banks to keep it safe. Sam was content to lodge it with Sandwich until he discovered the extent of the latter's debts and gambling habits. Now he has it at home and worries about strange sounds on the roof.

About Wednesday 25 January 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

Just one more off-topic memory: our London neighbours in the hungry days after WWII were sent a live duck for Christmas from the country. Of course, being townies, they did not know what to do with it and it waddled happily around their garden for several years afterwards.

About Tuesday 17 January 1664/65

Tonyel  •  Link

"then after a little time at Sir W. Batten’s, where I am mighty great and could if I thought it fit continue so,"
Anyone care to translate this? Does Sam feel that his relationship with Sir W is now that of an equal or just an ally in office politics? Or am I missing something?

About Saturday 31 December 1664

Tonyel  •  Link

"May our 2008 be free of plagues, pestilence, and, at year's end (forgive the digression), finally free of this maleficent, incompetent administration of the United States Government."
Plus ca change, etc.

Well, Happy new Year to all - especially Phil for allowing us another ten years of our 17thC soap opera.

About Monday 21 November 1664

Tonyel  •  Link

"Oh what a strutting little barnyard cock we are, crowing on our dunghill!"
--Australian Susan 11.20

Let's not be too hard on Sam. Here's the tailor's son, surrounded by the great and good of the land who actually listen to what he says and act on it. I'm sure many of us remember a point in our career where the realisation dawns, "They're taking notice of me - I think I've made it!"

About Tuesday 18 October 1664

Tonyel  •  Link

The Duke espied me, and came to me, and talked with me a very great while about our contract this day with Sir W. Warren, and among other things did with some contempt ask whether we did except Polliards, which Sir W. Batten did yesterday (in spite, as the Duke I believe by my Lord Barkely do well enough know) among other things in writing propose.
Can someone fathom this please? And should 'except' read 'accept'?

About Tuesday 11 October 1664

Tonyel  •  Link

"The attack was successful not least because the defenders had already withdrawn from the place before the fleet arrived."
Another reminder of the late and much missed Terry Pratchett: His hero Cohen the Barbarian who had survived many battles by being somewhere else at the time.

About Friday 7 October 1664

Tonyel  •  Link

"the ill-serving up of our victuals yesterday;"
He described this as a rare chine of beef but perhaps 'rare' was not a compliment. In the UK at least rare beef means lightly cooked so that the centre is still bloody. Or, perhaps it was a misprint for 'raw'. Either way, not an attractive dish to set before guests given the hygiene standards of the time.