Annotations and comments

LKvM has posted 45 annotations/comments since 5 November 2015.

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About Monday 18 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

" . . . and meeting Mr. Sidney Montagu and Sheres . . . so home to my house to dinner, where I had a pretty handsome sudden dinner, . . . ."

No matter what her faults may be, Elizabeth Pepys is clearly an excellent manager of the Pepys's household. It's amazing that her servants are so well schooled that Elizabeth apparently has fine food ready to serve at any time ("a pretty handsome sudden dinner" for Lord Sandwich's son) and plenty of it, not to mention that she is able to trot off to the theater every day after dinner and Pepys can even opt to invite Lord Peterborough, Lord Sandwich, and the Duke of York(!) to come have a "bit of bread" at his house.
And we hear no more of "washing day" and lighting the fire under the cauldron in the wee hours, so the staff are presumably managing all that on their own.
Maybe this ability comes from her aristocratic French background, i.e, she was born to it.

About Monday 11 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

". . . but would they would kill more of them."

TF commented:
"Who are 'them'? This seems to be an all Catholic affray: Captain Francis Bromwich was a cousin-german (first cousin) of James, Duke of Ormonde, [and] was killed by Mr. Symonds, one of Queen-Mother Henrietta Maria's servants."

Okay then, to me, if all those folks are Catholic, "would they would kill more of them" means "would these Catholics would kill more of these Catholics."

There certainly is a lot of lethal violence in this entry, starting with the reference to Clun (although his sensational murder, which everybody probably knew about, is not actually mentioned). It's enough to make the question of whether Sam's "guard" was actually a bodyguard a legitimate query.
I wonder if the trouble-making "hectors" were predominantly Catholic too.

About Wednesday 6 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

In our condo association I'm in charge of decorating the facade, carriageway, and courtyard of our 1820 French Creole Townhouse in the French Quarter in New Orleans, so today (Epiphany) I'm removing the Christmas decorations and replacing them with Mardi Gras decorations.
King cakes are a VERY big deal down here. They're supposed to have a little Baby Jesus (Christ as the King) baked into them, but nowadays the little baby is included separately with the cake and publicly poked inside it in real time after baking, not baked inside, in an effort on the part of bakers to keep from being sued if people choke on it.
Recently the City of New Orleans pro basketball team was named the "Baby Cakes," but that was a marketing failure because very few people outside New Orleans knew what it meant.

About Wednesday 6 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

In our condo association I'm in charge of decorating the facade, carriageway, and courtyard of our 1820 French Creole Townhouse in the French Quarter in New Orleans, so today (Epiphany) I'm removing the Christmas decorations and replacing them with Mardi Gras decorations.
King cakes are a VERY big deal down here. They're supposed to have just one token, a little baby Jesus (Christ as the King), baked into them, but nowadays the little baby is included with the cake but separately poked inside it in real time, after baking, to prevent people from choking on it.
Recently the City of New Orleans pro basketball team was named the "Baby Cakes," onviously an allusion to the "Baby Jesus" in the king cakes, but that was a marketing failure because very few people outside of New Orleans knew what it meant.

About Thursday 31 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Happy 2022 to all. "Auld Lang Syne" is my song because Jan. 1st is my birthday. I'll be four tomorrow -- four score, that is :-). I've loved the diary and will miss all this terribly when it comes to an end.

About Wednesday 30 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

I come from the American "Deep South" (Mississippi), which was mostly settled by people from the British Isles. My name is Dutch, and I was surprised to discover (thanks to Ancestry) that I'm 55% Scottish, 33% English, 5% Irish, only 4% Dutch, and 3% Welsh.
Down here we have the expression " I didn't know him from Adam's all fox," meaning "I didn't know him at all."
It never made any sense whatsoever, but everyone knew what it meant, so making sense didn't matter. It turns out that "Adam's all fox" is a corruption of "Adam's off ox," i.e., the right-side ox of Adam's pair of oxen.
(Adam's near ox has no fame at all.)

About Monday 21 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Such a great entry! I can see it all in my mind's eye.
I do wish he had said more about "Macbeth," my favorite play and opera, but it sounds as if there were rivals enough in the audience for Lady Macbeth's vehemence.

About Friday 18 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"and so by hackney coach to Brooke House . . . . " Coach-owner Sam had to hop a common hackney. Had Elizabeth commandeered the coach to track Deb?
Liked the ubi Hewer poem, but Hewer would have been in big trouble if he had "stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed."

About Friday 4 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"I fear that Sam's physical fitness will decline, now that he's riding instead of walking."
AnnieC, I also wondered if that might happen, but because of his daily schedule it probably won't.
I feel sure Sam was very fit, not only because he walked a lot, but also because he lived on what we today would call an "intermittent fasting" regimen.
He still had, perhaps, a "morning draught" (something we haven't heard of since the early years of the diary) but no food in the morning.
Then he breaks his fast by "dining" around noon and "supping" around 6:00pm.
That means he doesn't eat from 6:00pm one day until 12:00pm the next day, resulting in a "fast" of eighteen hours, which is the intermittent fasting routine that I and many others have adopted to lose weight, and I believe it would have kept him trim too, whether he walked or rode in his coach.

About Monday 23 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"That he do think that the Duke of Buckingham hath a mind rather to overthrow all the kingdom, and bring in a Commonwealth, wherein he may think to be General of their Army, or to make himself King, which, he believes, he may be led to, by some advice he hath had with conjurors, which he do affect."
Shades of "Macbeth." Sam has seen it and liked it, so maybe Buckingham has too.

About Tuesday 10 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

IMHO, Elizabeth is caught up in misdirected anger. The person she is really mad at is herself, because she could have had flings with Lord Sandwich, or the dashing Captain Ferrers, or maybe young Lord Hinchinbroke, and probably countless others, because of her beauty, but didn't.
Over the years her consequent resentment has so eaten away at her that now, with it brought to a head by the Deb incident, she shall "never sleep more" and raves like Lady Macbeth.

About Saturday 7 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Does anyone have any insight as to why our hero never became Sir Sam?"
Kelvin:
It was suggested somewhere (I can't recall where) that he probably wouldn't have wanted that honor because of the expense (or "charge," in his era's usage).
I think he should be awarded a knighthood posthumously.

About Tuesday 27 October 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Was Samuel a typical man of his time and status or was he a rake?"
I believe he was typical precisely BECAUSE he was a rake.
But not all men were. For example, his contemporary Isaac Newton died a virgin.

About Sunday 20 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

In case I'm not the only one who wondered about "turner," it's someone who forms articles on a lathe, and "turnery" consists of those articles, of which there are many on a ship, such as belaying pins, and Mrs. Turner's husband's occupational surname indicates he had a turner long ago in his family tree.

About Wednesday 16 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Work took more than 200 years . . . ."
I'm surprised it didn't take longer than that. The book "Sarum" is a good read about how long it took to build a cathedral, and "Secrets of the Castle" on Amazon Prime Videos shows what went into construction in early times.
Sad to hear about poor Fancy.

About Sunday 13 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

JWB on 14 Sep 2011:
"Less than honorable behavior by Duke of York."
Mary on 14 Sep 2011:
"Politics and honour don't necessarily go together."
Me: They hardly ever do.

James the DoY obviously trusts and relies on Sam completely. In view of the fact that Sam sees this handover of material mainly as a way to protect himself, James is an innocent.

About Friday 11 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Samuel Pepys, ghost writer to the Duke of York, is required to reply to the duke's "great letter" which he (Sam) has written. It sounds like a plot line in a novel.

About Friday 28 August 1668

LKvM  •  Link

James Duke of York strikes me as a very conscientious and serious person, in contrast to his lax and lazy older brother, King Charles II, who is a slacker.
The pair remind me a bit of Prince of Wales Charles, the next king, who talks to plants, and his redoubtable and tireless younger sister the Princess Royal Anne, who is staunch like Prince Philip and has been described as the only child of Queen Elizabeth II who has "the right stuff" to be the next monarch.