Annotations and comments

LKvM has posted 58 annotations/comments since 5 November 2015.

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Third Reading

About Monday 30 January 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

"... and so pretending to meet Mr. Shott ...”

Wouldn't this use of "pretending" mean that Sam was "claiming" to meet Mr. Shott, i.e., it was a ruse? After all, the "Old Pretender," the son of the deposed King James II, was so called because he "pretended" or "claimed" to be the rightful King of England. And his son, Bonnie Prince Charlie, was likewise the "Young Pretender," who also "claimed" to be the rightful King of England.

About Wednesday 18 January 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Regarding Pepys's playgoing and Shakespeare's plays, Pepys liked "Macbeth" a lot and saw it several times. He also was "mightily pleased" with "Hamlet." In fact, it was Pepys's comments about "Hamlet," often quoted elsewhere, that led me to his diary.

About Saturday 7 January 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Chris Horry, afterthought:
"Posset" is eggnog.
"Sack posset" would be eggnog spiked with the "sack" of that era, or nowadays with another alcohol beverage like brandy, dark rum, or bourbon.

Second Reading

About Sunday 9 May 1669

LKvM  •  Link

Regarding what happens in Hyde Park, there is a scene in the 2004 movie "Vanity Fair" (with Reese Witherspoon) which shows the many coaches circling the park, with some of the people in the coaches admiring others while a few, like Becky Sharp, deliberately "cut" (snub, I suppose) those they feel superior to.

About Tuesday 13 April 1669

LKvM  •  Link

"But here being in the court-yard, God would have it, I spied Deb. which made my heart and head to work, . . ."

This is exactly why Cupid is depicted with a bow strung with a dart that is devastatingly sharp, sharp enough to prick our masterful navy official back into obsessive, passionate love.

About Sunday 11 April 1669

LKvM  •  Link

" . . . the Duke of York, who did eye my wife mightily."
We all know Elizabeth was a great beauty and she must have been ogled by many, many more men than just the Duke of York, not to mention that the Earl of Sandwich had made an indecent proposal to her through an intermediary, asking if she'd become his mistress, to which she replied no.
I think the reason she became so depressed and furious and depressed when she discovered Sam's moves on Deb is that she was thinking, "Here I've been a good wife, I resisted all these attractive, rich, dashing men and remained faithful when I was so much sought-after, and for what? To catch him in the act of attempting to seduce my maid!"
And she couldn't forgive him because she regretted that she had wasted a lot of opportunities for romance.

About Thursday 18 March 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

"She is a mighty proper maid, and pretty comely, but so so;"
There is a little town in Mississippi called SoSo, presumably because it is nothing special.

About Saturday 6 March 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

I'm glad to hear that Coventry, sick and tired of all this nonsense and foolishness at the highest level of government, retired to Minster Lovell in Oxfordshire, where we can hope he lived out the rest of his life enjoying such gentlemanly pursuits as growing roses and raising champion sows like P. G. Wodehouse's ninth earl.

About Monday 22 February 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

" . . . my eyes being very ill since last Sunday and this day se’nnight . . . . "

Okay, this is Monday, and his eyes have been very ill since Sunday and Monday a week ago, which is what "this day [the Monday] se'nnight [seven nights ago]" means.
It's sort of like the German for "a week from today," which is "heute in acht Tagen": "today in eight days [counting this day]."

About Saturday 20 February 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

At the King’s play-house, March 19, 1665-66:
"[M]y business here was to see the inside of the stage and all the tiring-rooms and machines; and, indeed, it was a sight worthy seeing."

About Saturday 20 February 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

" . . . thence with them to Mrs. Gotier’s, the Queen’s tire-woman . . . ."
"Mrs. Gotier" is glossed as "Mrs.
Gaultier," which would be "Mrs. Walter" to us (and to Italians: Gualtier is the first name of the lecherous Duke of Mantua's "poor student" alter ego in "Rigoletto").
The "tiring" room at a theater of that period was the costuming area. (I believe there was also already a "green room" back then too, where actors waited for their cues to go onstage, same as "the talent" waits to go on in a "green room" (it doesn't have to be green!) today.

About Monday 18 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

" . . . and meeting Mr. Sidney Montagu and Sheres . . . so home to my house to dinner, where I had a pretty handsome sudden dinner, . . . ."

No matter what her faults may be, Elizabeth Pepys is clearly an excellent manager of the Pepys's household. It's amazing that her servants are so well schooled that Elizabeth apparently has fine food ready to serve at any time ("a pretty handsome sudden dinner" for Lord Sandwich's son) and plenty of it, not to mention that she is able to trot off to the theater every day after dinner and Pepys can even opt to invite Lord Peterborough, Lord Sandwich, and the Duke of York(!) to come have a "bit of bread" at his house.
And we hear no more of "washing day" and lighting the fire under the cauldron in the wee hours, so the staff are presumably managing all that on their own.
Maybe this ability comes from her aristocratic French background, i.e, she was born to it.

About Monday 11 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

". . . but would they would kill more of them."

TF commented:
"Who are 'them'? This seems to be an all Catholic affray: Captain Francis Bromwich was a cousin-german (first cousin) of James, Duke of Ormonde, [and] was killed by Mr. Symonds, one of Queen-Mother Henrietta Maria's servants."

Okay then, to me, if all those folks are Catholic, "would they would kill more of them" means "would these Catholics would kill more of these Catholics."

There certainly is a lot of lethal violence in this entry, starting with the reference to Clun (although his sensational murder, which everybody probably knew about, is not actually mentioned). It's enough to make the question of whether Sam's "guard" was actually a bodyguard a legitimate query.
I wonder if the trouble-making "hectors" were predominantly Catholic too.

About Wednesday 6 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

In our condo association I'm in charge of decorating the facade, carriageway, and courtyard of our 1820 French Creole Townhouse in the French Quarter in New Orleans, so today (Epiphany) I'm removing the Christmas decorations and replacing them with Mardi Gras decorations.
King cakes are a VERY big deal down here. They're supposed to have a little Baby Jesus (Christ as the King) baked into them, but nowadays the little baby is included separately with the cake and publicly poked inside it in real time after baking, not baked inside, in an effort on the part of bakers to keep from being sued if people choke on it.
Recently the City of New Orleans pro basketball team was named the "Baby Cakes," but that was a marketing failure because very few people outside New Orleans knew what it meant.

About Wednesday 6 January 1668/69

LKvM  •  Link

In our condo association I'm in charge of decorating the facade, carriageway, and courtyard of our 1820 French Creole Townhouse in the French Quarter in New Orleans, so today (Epiphany) I'm removing the Christmas decorations and replacing them with Mardi Gras decorations.
King cakes are a VERY big deal down here. They're supposed to have just one token, a little baby Jesus (Christ as the King), baked into them, but nowadays the little baby is included with the cake but separately poked inside it in real time, after baking, to prevent people from choking on it.
Recently the City of New Orleans pro basketball team was named the "Baby Cakes," onviously an allusion to the "Baby Jesus" in the king cakes, but that was a marketing failure because very few people outside of New Orleans knew what it meant.

About Thursday 31 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Happy 2022 to all. "Auld Lang Syne" is my song because Jan. 1st is my birthday. I'll be four tomorrow -- four score, that is :-). I've loved the diary and will miss all this terribly when it comes to an end.

About Wednesday 30 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

I come from the American "Deep South" (Mississippi), which was mostly settled by people from the British Isles. My name is Dutch, and I was surprised to discover (thanks to Ancestry) that I'm 55% Scottish, 33% English, 5% Irish, only 4% Dutch, and 3% Welsh.
Down here we have the expression " I didn't know him from Adam's all fox," meaning "I didn't know him at all."
It never made any sense whatsoever, but everyone knew what it meant, so making sense didn't matter. It turns out that "Adam's all fox" is a corruption of "Adam's off ox," i.e., the right-side ox of Adam's pair of oxen.
(Adam's near ox has no fame at all.)

About Monday 21 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Such a great entry! I can see it all in my mind's eye.
I do wish he had said more about "Macbeth," my favorite play and opera, but it sounds as if there were rivals enough in the audience for Lady Macbeth's vehemence.