Friday 23 April 1669

Going to rise, without saying anything, my wife stopped me; and, after a little angry talk, did tell me how she spent all day yesterday with M. Batelier and her sweetheart, and seeing a play at the New Nursery, which is set up at the house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, which was formerly the King’s house. So that I was mightily pleased again, and rose a with great content; and so by water to White Hall, and there to the Council-Chamber, and heard two or three causes: among others, that of the complaint of Sir Philip Howard and Watson, the inventors, as they pretend, of the business of varnishing and lackerworke, against the Company of Painters, who take upon them to do the same thing; where I saw a great instance of the weakness of a young Counsel not used to such an audience, against the Solicitor-General and two more able Counsel used to it. Though he had the right of, his side, and did prevail for what he pretended to against the rest, yet it was with much disadvantage and hazard. Here, also I heard Mr. Papillion make his defence to the King, against some complaints of the Farmers of Excise; but it was so weak, and done only by his own seeking, that it was to his injury more than profit, and made his case the worse, being ill managed, and in a cause against the King. Thence at noon, the Council rising, I to Unthanke’s, and there by agreement met my wife, and with her to the Cocke, and did give her a dinner, but yet both of us but in an ill humour, whatever was the matter with her, but thence to the King’s playhouse, and saw “The Generous Portugalls,” a play that pleases me better and better every time we see it; and, I thank God! it did not trouble my eyes so much as I was afeard it would. Here, by accident, we met Mr. Sheres, and yet I could not but be troubled, because my wife do so delight to talk of him, and to see him. Nevertheless, we took him with us to our Mercer’s, and to the Exchange, and he helped me to choose a summer-suit of coloured camelott, coat and breeches, and a flowered tabby vest very rich; and so home, where he took his leave, and down to Greenwich, where he hath some friends; and I to see Colonel Middleton, who hath been ill for a day or two, or three; and so home to supper, and to bed.

8 Annotations

Australian Susan   Link to this

No mention of St George's Day.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

I went down to my basement looking for some music, and what should I find but "Beauty Retire", Sam's tune, just four bars. I took it up and played it on the organ, just a bitty thing and sort of Renaissance musique. There too was "Samuel Pepys In The Diary" by Percival Hunt (1958). I read the first chapter, very good prose. I never did find a full four fingers in the right hand arrangement of O Sole Mio, better known as "It's Now Or Never" by Elvis. Better to read of Samuel Pepys.

Jenny   Link to this

Hmmm, Sheres is in town and Elizabeth is ostensibly spending a lot of time with Mary Batelier who conveniently provides a good alibi.

sue nicholson   Link to this

I agree, Jenny. Amusing to see how Sam is ignoring what is clearly a dalliance, at least, between Sheres and Elizabeth. He's turning up pretty much every week at the moment; theatre visits, lunch parties etc.

nix   Link to this

> where I saw a great instance of the
> weakness of a young Counsel not used
> to such an audience, against the
> Solicitor-General and two more able
> Counsel used to it. Though he had the
> right of, his side, and did prevail
> for what he pretended to against the
> rest, yet it was with much disadvantage
> and hazard.

Ouch -- I feel that one. The exact same thing happened to me early in my legal career, arguing a case against the most renowned lawyer in Arizona. I wasn't as fortunate as Samuel's young lawyer that day, but did wind up winning it on appeal.

(Note that in 17th century usage "pretended to" meant "put forward," not "feigned.")

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...but yet both of us but in an ill humour, whatever was the matter with her, but thence to the King’s playhouse, and saw “The Generous Portugalls,” a play that pleases me better and better every time we see it; and, I thank God! it did not trouble my eyes so much as I was afeard it would. Here, by accident, we met Mr. Sheres, and yet I could not but be troubled, because my wife do so delight to talk of him, and to see him."

Hee, hee, hee, hee...What a maroon, what a tar-rah-rah goondeay as Bugs Bunny would say. Give 'im the works Bess.

Jim   Link to this

I'm surprised Sam doesn't use his influence to have Sheeres shipped out to some god forsaken place such as . . . Tangiers.

Jenny   Link to this

"by accident". Oh c'mon Sam. Yes, she certainly does "so delight to talk to him, and to see him". You seriously think she's been spending all that time with Mary Batelier?

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