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Sue Nicholson has posted 34 annotations/comments since 17 November 2011.

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About Sunday 27 March 1664

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

San Diego Sarah, a 'close' in this context is a field or piece of agricultural land surrounded by a hedge or wall. The son in question was around 20 years of age, I think.

About The BBC's 'A Concert For Samuel Pepys'

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

It was an atmospheric evening in St Olave's church, with Elizabeth's memorial bust looking down from her high perch above the altar and Pepys' Victorian image gazing morosely from the South wall where the Navy pew once stood. In the nave of Pepys "own church", an expectant audience gathered.

Lucie Skeaping gave an excellent commentary throughout, with lots of interesting background detail. Music scholar Dionysios Kyropoulos introduced his work: he had discovered four leather-bound volumes in the Pepys Library containing tablature for more than 100 songs in three sections; Light, Grave and Sacred and which he has rewritten in modern musical notation. The originals were mostly by Cesare Morelli, Pepys' personal musician employed from 1675 until 1682. Dionysios speculated that he would have been an intellectual companion for Pepys in the years after Elizabeth's death. (This friendship with an Italian catholic was to lead to difficulties however in the turmoil of the so-called "Popish Plot" of 1679 when Pepys was arrested and imprisoned for alleged Catholic sympathies.)

In total, eleven pieces including one by Pepys himself, were performed by Bass-baritone vocalist David Ireland with James Bramley on theorbo and Toby Carr on baroque guitar. Most were composed in "stilo representativo" where the music serves the text; no verse or chorus, simply an expressive tune to underpin the words. Pepys wrote the famous "Beauty Retire" in this style. He was so proud of this that he had himself painted by John Hayls, holding the score in his hand. I did think however that he would have been astounded to hear it performed in church in 2017.

The concert was a delight. It will be broadcast on Radio 4 on April 4th at 11.30am and will then be available on the Radio 4 website for a further 28 days. Not to be missed!

About Sunday Lunch with Mr and Mrs Pepys

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Dear MN Graham Dukes,
You might be interested in Jeannine Kerwin's excellent In Depth Article, "A Voice for Elizabeth" which examines her background and her place in the diary.
Pepys was fluent in French himself so it seems reasonable to assume that Elizabeth, with her French background, was too. As for her accent...qui sais? She was of course born and brought up in England. Girls at this time didn't usually go to school, being educated (or not) at home by family and/ or tutors.

About Friday 11 September 1663

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Griffith was the keeper of the gate into the Navy Office premises ( office, yards, garden and lodgings) keeping watch over the Seething Lane entrance. The gate which was left open and which the watchman had noted, was the back door to Pepys house, on Crutched Friars. There was a yard between the street and the house.

About Sunday 9 August 1663

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

"...the silver pen Mr Coventry did give me" Early reference to a fountain pen. I imagine it leaked, which would not have gone down well with fastidious Mr Pepys.
I note that it is "Mr" Coventry rather than "Sir William" so assume this is Henry, the elder brother. At this point in his career he was Groom of the Bedchamber:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Coventry

About Wednesday 1 April 1663

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Re bedrooms at Seething Lane:
SPOILER. The clearest indication comes in the entry for 2nd March 1669 when Sam held the only major house party of the diary period. A large family gathering descended upon Seething Lane for one night only and Sam lists the various sleeping arrangements:

Cousin Pepys and his wife in our blue chamber
Cousin Turner, her sister and The. in our best chamber
Bab., Betty and Betty Turner in our own chamber
Myself and my wife in the maid’s bed which is very good
Our maids in the coachman’s bed
The coachman with the boy in his settle bed
And Tom where he uses to lie (in a little room off the Hall?)

About Sunday Lunch with Mr and Mrs Pepys

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Saul, my apologies for not getting back to you before now; I don't often visit this page.

All the references for my research into Pepys' house are listed at the end of my in-depth article "At Home with Mr and Mrs Pepys". Thank-you for asking.

About Monday 9 March 1662/63

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Hi Louise
If you'd like to read my "in-depth articles" on this website about Pepys' house and garden, I think that would answer your question.
Interesting reference today about the Lord Mayor requesting access through the garden entrance on Tower Hill. The map in my article on Pepys' garden shows where this entrance is, at the rear of the Navy Office site . Pepys used it once when he was being pursued by bailiffs.

About Wednesday 15 February 1659/60

Sue Nicholson  •  Link

Phil
Just wanted to say thank-you for all your hard work in setting up the annotation facility again. I look forward to reading interesting and amusing posts from the Pepys community.
You are a brave man to take on this huge commitment and responsibility for a second time!