Sunday 23 August 1668

(Lord’s day). Up betimes, my head busy in my great letter, and I did first hang up my new map of Paris in my green room, and changed others in other places. Then to Captain Cocke’s, thinking to have talked more of what he told me yesterday, but he was not within. So back to church, and heard a good sermon of Mr. Gifford’s at our church, upon “Seek ye first the kingdom of Heaven and its righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.” A very excellent and persuasive, good and moral sermon. Shewed, like a wise man, that righteousness is a surer moral way of being rich, than sin and villainy. Then home to dinner, where Mr. Pelling, who brought us a hare, which we had at dinner, and W. Howe. After dinner to the Office, Mr. Gibson and I, to examine my letter to the Duke of York, which, to my great joy, I did very well by my paper tube, without pain to my eyes. And I do mightily like what I have therein done; and did, according to the Duke of York’s order, make haste to St. James’s, and about four o’clock got thither: and there the Duke of York was ready, to expect me, and did hear it all over with extraordinary content; and did give me many and hearty thanks, and in words the most expressive tell me his sense of my good endeavours, and that he would have a care of me on all occasions; and did, with much inwardness, —[i.e., intimacy.]— tell me what was doing, suitable almost to what Captain Cocke tells me, of designs to make alterations in the Navy; and is most open to me in them, and with utmost confidence desires my further advice on all occasions: and he resolves to have my letter transcribed, and sent forthwith to the Office. So, with as much satisfaction as I could possibly, or did hope for, and obligation on the Duke of York’s side professed to me, I away into the Park, and there met Mr. Pierce and his wife, and sister and brother, and a little boy, and with them to Mulberry Garden, and spent 18s. on them, and there left them, she being again with child, and by it, the least pretty that ever I saw her. And so I away, and got a coach, and home, and there with my wife and W. Hewer, talking all the evening, my mind running on the business of the Office, to see what more I can do to the rendering myself acceptable and useful to all and to the King. We to supper, and to bed.

12 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I did first hang up my new map of Paris in my green room "

L&M say Pepys had this map:
http://picpus.mmlc.northwestern.edu/mbin/WebObj...

***

"heard a good sermon of Mr. Gifford's at our church, upon "Seek ye first the kingdom of Heaven and its righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you." "

Luke 12::31 KJV: "But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you. "
The climax of a parable beginning @ Luke 12:15 to And he said unto them, Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man's life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth. 16 And he spake a parable unto them,
http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=luk...

Chris Squire   Link to this

I wonder how long elapsed between Mr P turning up with his hare, fresh of course, snared and strangled on Friday, sold on Saturday to be eaten on Sunday, and the party sitting down to eat it.

Quite a bit of work in between particularly for a cook who was not expecting it.

It may be that what Mr P bought was a hare pie, which only needed to be heated up.

Art perry   Link to this

A footnote on Aug 20 http://goo.gl/xMKdu identifies the manuscript of this "Great Letter". Is the manuscript available online?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I did first hang up my new map of Paris in my green room..."

"We'll always have Paris..." Sigh. Makes me think of how that touching silly bit of phony French film on SNL with Gilda Radner years ago now breaks the heart to see it. Ah, well...If we knew how precious the days we have are... I can just see an innocent line like this breaking old Sam's heart as he reread the Diary that year of decision when the Diary's fate hung in the balance.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Art, as far s I can tell, only a partial catalog of the Pepysian Library is available online. http://www.archive.org/details/adescriptivecat0...
Whether this letter is among those published I cannot tell.

Mary   Link to this

"the least pretty that I ever saw her."

The repeated pregnancies are having their effect on Mrs. Pierce. Not so long ago Sam found her very attractive even when heavily pregnant, but no longer, it seems. There is also the question of the make-up that she has taken to wearing - anathema to Pepys. Could be that awareness of her declining looks has prompted her attempts at improving on nature with 'paint'.

languagehat   Link to this

"Makes me think of how that touching silly bit of phony French film on SNL with Gilda Radner years ago now breaks the heart to see it."

Actually, I'm pretty sure that was a bit of phony Italian film (and specifically a Fellini parody). But yes, touching indeed; I think of it often.

Jesse   Link to this

"righteousness is a surer moral way of being rich, than sin and villainy"

Seems like a tautology to me whether 'rich' is literal or figurative.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

The one flaw in Betty Pierce's defense against the Stuart court showing up, eh?

Claire   Link to this

Has anyone posted an explanation of the "paper tube" that Pepys employs to help his failing eyesight? Is there a lens in it?

Mary   Link to this

Yes, Claire.

See http://www.pepysdiary.com/archive/1668/08/12

for an annotation.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Mr Pelling's hare.

Hare is always hung. (I well remember coming upon our cat in the larder on her tippiest tiptoes trying to reach the tempting object hanging out of her reach)

I agree it is odd that he turns up with the creature and they eat it at once. I suspect it may already have been hung and thus was ready for cooking - roast saddle of hare is deeeeeeliccccccccccciiiiiiiiiioussssssss! So is jugged hare in red wine. With juniper berries.

I think if Pelling had come armed with a pie (or even a pasty), Sam would have said so.

I think this is the first time Sam has remarked on eating this particular type of tasty game.

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