Wednesday 27 May 1668

Up, and to the office, where some time upon Sir D. Gawden’s accounts, and then I by water to Westminster for some Tangier orders, and so meeting with Mr. Sawyers my old chamber-fellow, he and I by water together to the Temple, he giving me an account of the base, rude usage, which he and Sir G. Carteret had lately, before the Commissioners of Accounts, where he was, as Counsel to Sir G. Carteret, which I was sorry to hear, they behaving themselves like most insolent and ill-mannered men. Thence by coach to the Exchange, and there met with Sir H. Cholmly at Colvill’s; and there did give him some orders, and so home, and there to the office again, where busy till two o’clock, and then with Sir D. Gawden to his house, with my Lord Brouncker and Sir J. Minnes, to dinner, where we dined very well, and much good company, among others, a Dr., a fat man, whom by face I know, as one that uses to sit in our church, that after dinner did take me out, and walked together, who told me that he had now newly entered himself into Orders, in the decay of the Church, and did think it his duty so to do, thereby to do his part toward the support and reformation thereof; and spoke very soberly, and said that just about the same age Dr. Donne did enter into Orders. I find him a sober gentleman, and a man that hath seen much of the world, and I think may do good. Thence after dinner to the office, and there did a little business, and so to see Sir W. Pen, who I find still very ill of the goute, sitting in his great chair, made on purpose for persons sick of that disease, for their ease; and this very chair, he tells me, was made for my Lady Lambert! Thence I by coach to my tailor’s, there to direct about the making of me another suit, and so to White Hall, and through St. James’s Park to St. James’s, thinking to have met with Mr. Wren, but could not, and so homeward toward the New Exchange, and meeting Mr. Creed he and I to drink some whey at the whey-house, and so into the ‘Change and took a walk or two, and so home, and there vexed at my boy’s being out of doors till ten at night, but it was upon my brother Jackson’s business, and so I was the less displeased, and then made the boy to read to me out of Dr. Wilkins his “Real Character,” and particularly about Noah’s arke, where he do give a very good account thereof, shewing how few the number of the several species of beasts and fowls were that were to be in the arke, and that there was room enough for them and their food and dung, which do please me mightily and is much beyond what ever I heard of the subject, and so to bed.

8 Annotations

Jesse   Link to this

"particularly about Noah’s arke"

Hard to see how the practicality of Noah's ark fits into the general subject... although this link http://www.metricationmatters.com/docs/WilkinsT... has a few snippets of the text including one on measure or "Those several relations of Quantity, whereby men use to judge of the Multitude..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to see Sir W. Pen, who I find still very ill of the goute, sitting in his great chair, made on purpose for persons sick of that disease, for their ease; and this very chair, he tells me, was made for my Lady Lambert!"

L&M wonder if this chair was made for Viscountess Lambert (d. 1649), an Irish acquaintance of Penn's, whom Pepys may have mistaken for the wife of the republican Maj. Gen. John Lambert [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/109/ ].

Gout-chairs often had wheels:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/11/29/#c31...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...made the boy to read to me out of Dr. Wilkins his “Real Character,” and particularly about Noah’s arke, where he do give a very good account thereof, shewing how few the number of the several species of beasts and fowls were that were to be in the arke, and that there was room enough for them and their food and dung, which do please me mightily and is much beyond what ever I heard of the subject, and so to bed."

Somehow it's very Sam that he would be mainly concerned how the practical side of Noah's voyage could be worked. He and Leopold Bloom would have had a grand time together.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

they behaving themselves like most insolent and ill-mannered men.
This is a creature of the Parliament, or legislature, trying to beat up the King's offices, or executive department. That's why we have checks and balances in the US Constitution, to keep the legislature, executive, and judicial divisions within their due bounds. One or another is always trying to over reach and usurp more authority. It's all laid out and foretold in The Federalist Papers. Eventually the Parliament has to come to terms with the Navy. Parliament can complain, but they can't run the Navy, much as they would like to.

Phoenix   Link to this

"...about Noah’s arke ..."

One of the many pleasures of the diary is how it provokes one into drawing modern parallels - that in today's world it is likely that much intellectual effort is being spent in support of beliefs as equally and utterly delusional.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“about Noah’s arke”

L&M note Pt. II, Ch. V of Wilkins’ book is entitled “A digression concerning the capacity of Noah’s Ark.”

Here are a link to an essay on that text and the text + illustrations:

“Bishop John Wilkins, F.R.S. (1614-1672) and His Discussion of Noah’s Ark” by Todd Charles Wood to which is appended
"Noah’s Ark"
Excerpt from *An Essay Towards a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language* By John Wilkins, 1668
including illustrations, tables and Wilkins' explanations of his proposal. http://documents.clubexpress.com/documents.ashx...

arby   Link to this

Cool, thanks.

pepfie   Link to this

Phoenix, how very true. If you haven't done so already follow TF's link to a perfect example.

"Although he can hardly be blamed with the current estrangement of science and religion, Wilkins must bear some responsibility, since he enshrined the separation of theological authority from science into the Royal Society itself, and thereby into English scientific culture."
TODD CHARLES WOOD¹
¹Center for Origins Research, Bryan College, Dayton, TN, USA

Ts ts.

And Wilkins' calculation is convincing:
"...a distinct inquiry into all such (species) as are yet known... are much fewer then is commonly imagined, not a hundred sorts of Beasts, nor two hundred of Birds", amounting to 300 beef units of herbivores (including 1825 sheep equivalents to feed the wolves) and 30 wolf units of raptors plus carnivorous beavers. Snakes, toads and the like stay in the bilge; amphibians fend for themselves.
So there is ample room in the ark's 41.000+ m³ even regarding a year's supply of hay in two thirds of one deck. Easy. The bigger problem is that the capacity of the ark may appear too large. Well, there might be and probably are some as yet unknown species.

Take that, hereticks of old, and Atheistical scoffers in these later times!

Ooops, sorry, forgot the copyright:
This document is copyright ©2007 by the BSG. Permission to copy this document is granted provided the entire copyright statement is included.

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