Thursday 9 April 1668

Up, and to the office, where all the morning sitting, then at noon home to dinner with my people, and so to the office again writing of my letters, and then abroad to my bookseller’s, and up and down to the Duke of York’s playhouse, there to see, which I did, Sir W. Davenant’s corpse carried out towards Westminster, there to be buried. Here were many coaches and six horses, and many hacknies, that made it look, methought, as if it were the buriall of a poor poet. He seemed to have many children, by five or six in the first mourning-coach, all boys. And there I left them coming forth, and I to the New Exchange, there to meet Mrs. Burroughs, and did take her in a carosse and carry elle towards the Park, kissing her …, but did not go into any house, but come back and set her down at White Hall, and did give her wrapt in paper for my Valentine’s gift for the last year before this, which I never did yet give her anything for, twelve half-crowns, and so back home and there to my office, where come a packet from the Downes from my brother Balty, who, with Harman, is arrived there, of which this day come the first news. And now the Parliament will be satisfied, I suppose, about the business they have so long desired between Brouncker and Harman about not prosecuting the first victory. Balty is very well, and I hope hath performed his work well, that I may get him into future employment. I wrote to him this night, and so home, and there to the perfecting my getting the scale of musique without book, which I have done to perfection backward and forward, and so to supper and to bed.

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The ellipsis above marks the omission of Pepys's tryst with a regular

"...I to the New Exchange, there to meet Mrs. Burroughs; and did tomar her in a carosse and carry ella towards the Park, kissing her and tocanda su breast, so as to make myself do; but did not go into any house,...."

L&M text.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

9th April, 1668. To London, about finishing my grand account of the sick and wounded, and prisoners at war, amounting to above £34,000. I heard Sir R. Howard impeach Sir William Penn, in the House of Lords, for breaking bulk, and taking away rich goods out of the East India prizes, formerly taken by Lord Sandwich.

http://is.gd/nPP3F0

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

Apr: 9. 1668. The Curator produced 2 Receiuers whereof one was of Latton
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latten ] and of a Conicall figure the - other of Glasse and Round both sharp at one end. bein applyed to the ear the former was Iudged best for the Increasing of sounds. It was orderd that the Curator should take them home and try them further by himself and particularly in the silent [of the] Night..., and to bring in an account of their effects. ...(2 boxes of Padoua seeds from Mr Howard)

Da Cunha's Letter [ http://www.portugueses-rsl.com/home.html ]) the great [petrified] Nautilus stone by mr Howard) Sr T de Vaux some petrifactions) Dr Charlton. Citta [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuthatch ] and Phoenicuras
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenicurus ]) Philips's paper of tides.)

The Curator being called vpon to declare what apparatus he had ready thought of for the Expt. of Diuing to be tryd by the vrinator that offers himself for it, said that there were made formerly diuing Boxes which he would put in order, and that the Expt. necessary to be made first of all for the purpose was to try which way the Diuer could continue a good while vnder water soe as to work there freely which being once contriued soe as to succeed, there would then offer it self a great number of Experiments to be made vnder water.

(Dr Clarks paper about making Alum

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"The Curator being called vpon to declare what apparatus he had ready thought of for the Expt. of Diuing to be tryd by the vrinator that offers himself for it, said that there were made formerly diuing Boxes which he would put in order, and that the Expt. necessary to be made first of all for the purpose was to try which way the Diuer could continue a good while vnder water soe as to work there freely which being once contriued soe as to succeed, there would then offer it self a great number of Experiments to be made vnder water. "

Hooke might have been referring to the 1535 device by Guglielmo de Lorena that can be considered a true diving bell. This apparatus rested on diver’s shoulders and had much of its weight supported by slings. This bell provided enough air for the diver to breathe.
http://library.thinkquest.org/28170/media/221db...

Here's an account of Hooke's own (awful) diving experiment and, below that, an image of the bell Edmund Halley developed in the 1690's.
http://books.google.com/books?id=MWr8ZPOTeDsC&p...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"And there I left them coming forth, and I to the New Exchange, there to meet Mrs. Burroughs, and did take her in a carosse and carry elle towards the Park, kissing her..."

Hmmn...I guess Leopold Bloom here would say something about wanting life after his journey among the Dead. One wonders if Joyce ever did read Sam?

Meanwhile, speaking of journeying among the Dead...How is Bess making out (ouch) in Brampton?

It was surprising how little protest she put up about going this year. Perhaps she went with a bunch of gifts for new bride Pall and was eager to play Lady Bountiful since she didn't get to do the wedding planner?

Or maybe Sam used his new and successful "silent" treatment...

"I won't go!! Sam'l!! Put me down, Will Hewer!!! I'll never be taken to that Hell in Brampton again!!! Deborah, cut these ropes!!! Help!!!! Sam'l!! Are you listening to me?!!"

"See, Hewer the other remarkable thing about the Otacousticon is that it blocks all sounds within a 15 foot radius." Sam notes happily, ear to borrowed device.

"Yes, sir." Hewer sighs, glancing to tied down Bess on cart, still screaming.

Fine for him...I've got to accompany her to Brampton...

"Sam'l!!!" Hewer can make out her frantic cries by gesture and lip movement though the Otacousticon does its work well.

"All my best to Father, John, and Pall, sweetheart." Sam calls, waving...

"She'll calm down in a few hours, Hewer, never fear. This new method of dealing is a marvel..." Sam beams.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

@Robert G, do you suppose the absence of Saml's late Mum helps?

language hat   Link to this

"kissing her and tocanda su breast, so as to make myself do"

The use of the verb "do" for "have sexual intercourse with" is of course of long standing (ca. 1650: "But hee knewe not how to woo me nor do me"), but I don't think I've seen it used intransitively in the sense of today's "come" before.

martinb   Link to this

I think he's used the Spanish "hacer" intransitively in previous entries.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I heard Sir R. Howard impeach Sir William Penn, in the House of Lords, for breaking bulk, and taking away rich goods out of the East India prizes, formerly taken by Lord Sandwich."

The charges will be debated in Commons 5 days from now (on the 14th in Grey): http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Bess seemed to be getting on with Meg last time they were together in London not long before Meg passed on. Her big thing has been with John Sr., especially since the Coleman affair. I wonder if all her fussing over Pall's wedding made things a bit more friendly between them.

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