Friday 28 February 1667/68

Up, and to the office, where all the morning doing business, and after dinner with Sir W. Pen to White Hall, where we and the rest of us presented a great letter of the state of our want of money to his Royal Highness. I did also present a demand of mine for consideration for my travelling-charges of coach and boat-hire during the war, which, though his Royal Highness and the company did all like of, yet, contrary to my expectation, I find him so jealous now of doing any thing extraordinary, that he desired the gentlemen that they would consider it, and report their minds in it to him. This did unsettle my mind a great while, not expecting this stop: but, however, I shall do as well, I know, though it causes me a little stop. But that, that troubles me most is, that while we were thus together with the Duke of York, comes in Mr. Wren from the House, where, he tells us, another storm hath been all this day almost against the Officers of the Navy upon this complaint, — that though they have made good rules for payment of tickets, yet that they have not observed them themselves, which was driven so high as to have it urged that we should presently be put out of our places: and so they have at last ordered that we shall be heard at the bar of the House upon this business on Thursday next. This did mightily trouble me and us all; but me particularly, who am least able to bear these troubles, though I have the least cause to be concerned in it. Thence, therefore, to visit Sir H. Cholmly, who hath for some time been ill of a cold; and thence walked towards Westminster, and met Colonel Birch, who took me back to walk with him, and did give me an account of this day’s heat against the Navy Officers, and an account of his speech on our behalf, which was very good; and indeed we are much beholden to him, as I, after I parted with him, did find by my cozen Roger, whom I went to: and he and I to his lodgings. And there he did tell me the same over again; and how much Birch did stand up in our defence; and that he do see that there are many desirous to have us out of the Office; and the House is so furious and passionate, that he thinks nobody can be secure, let him deserve never so well. But now, he tells me, we shall have a fair hearing of the House, and he hopes justice of them: but, upon the whole, he do agree with me that I should hold my hand as to making any purchase of land, which I had formerly discoursed with him about, till we see a little further how matters go. He tells me that that made them so mad to-day first was, several letters in the House about the Fanatickes, in several places, coming in great bodies, and turning people out of the churches, and there preaching themselves, and pulling the surplice over the Parsons’ heads: this was confirmed from several places; which makes them stark mad, especially the hectors and bravadoes of the House, who shew all the zeal on this occasion. Having done with him, I home vexed in my mind, and so fit for no business, but sat talking with my wife and supped with her; and Nan Mercer come and sat all the evening with us, and much pretty discourse, which did a little ease me, and so to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...I find [HRH] so jealous now of doing any thing extraordinary..."

JEALOUS: fearful, suspicious, mistrustful. (L&M Select Glossary)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"another storm hath been all this day almost against the Officers of the Navy "

House of Commons Journal
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Grey's Debates
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Brian   Link to this

"He tells me that that made them so mad to-day first was . . . " L&M have three that's (that that that.) While it looks strange, 3 that's vs. 2 makes more sense to my ear. Although if I were writing it today, "that that which" sounds better to me.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I imagine Sam Pepys' quite honest traveling charges would make anyone charged to pass them blanch a little at the thought of Parliament investigating.

"Lord, we could fund the fleet on this." "No human being could've traveled so many places in a single day." "Three o'clock in the morning the man claims to have been on the river to inspect the fleet? No government official is up at three o'clock in the morning, especially with a wife like his." "Call the watermen and coachmen forth!" "Ask them if he spoke Latin during his trips!" "I have here in my hand proof that Samuel Pepys and fifty government employees are rosary-bead carrying members of the Papist Party."

Christopher Squire   Link to this

‘Stop n.
. . 2. In certain specific uses: A veto or prohibition (against); an embargo (upon goods, trade); a refusal to pass tokens; an order stopping payment of a bank note, cheque, or bill.
stop of the exchequer, the suspension of payment of the Government debt to the London goldsmiths in 1672.
1634    in J. Simon Ess. Irish Coins (1749) 115   Complaints‥concerning the stop and refusall of farthing tokens.
. . 1723    London Gaz. No. 6133/4,   A Stop is put against any Claim at the South-Sea-Office.’ [OED]

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"we shall be heard at the bar of the House upon this business on Thursday next."

For Pepys's speech defending the Navy Board see 5 March. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/05/

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...I home vexed in my mind, and so fit for no business, but sat talking with my wife and supped with her; and Nan Mercer come and sat all the evening with us, and much pretty discourse, which did a little ease me, and so to bed...."

Clever Bess. Loving Bess.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

And even cleverer Mary Mercer...Who can charm both Pepys, not a mean feat.

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